Curriculum Core French Grade 10

Subject: 
Core French
Grade: 
Grade 10
Big Ideas: 
Listening and viewing with intent strengthens our understanding and acquisition of French.
Expressing oneself and engaging in conversation in French requires courage and risk taking.
Acquiring a language can shape one’s perspective, identity, and voice.
Acquiring a language provides us with new opportunities to appreciate and value creative works and cultural diversity.
Acquiring French opens the door to interacting with the Francophone world.
Acquiring French allows us to explore career, travel, personal growth, and study abroad opportunities.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • creative works: for example, books, dance, paintings, pictures, poems, songs
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use a growing number of strategies to derive and negotiate meaning
  • Recognize that choice of words affects meaning
  • Derive meaning from a variety of texts
  • Locate and explore a variety of online media in French
  • Narrate stories orally and in writing
  • Recognize the importance of story in personal, family, and community identity
  • Engage in short conversations
  • Express themselves with growing fluency, orally and in writing:
    • ask and respond to a variety of questions
    • describe situations, day-to-day activities, and series of events
    • express the degree to which they like or dislike objects and activities
    • express hopes, dreams, desires, and ambitions
    • express opinions on familiar topics
  • Appreciate that there are regional variations in French
  • Recognize how cultural identity is expressed through Francophone texts and creative works
  • Recognize contributions of Francophone Canadians to society
  • Engage with Francophone communities, people, or experiences
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • strategies to derive and negotiate meaning: for example, using circumlocution, paraphrasing, reformulation, reiteration, repetition, word substitution; interpreting body language, expression, and tone; using contextual cues; interpreting familiar words
  • choice of words: for example, different degrees of formality, degrees of directness, choice of verb tense and modality
  • Derive meaning: comprehend key elements, supporting details, time, and place
  • a variety of online media in French: for example, articles, blogs, cartoons, music, news, videos
  • Narrate: using expressions of time and transitional words to show logical progression; using present, past, and future timeframes
  • stories: Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and fictional or non-fictional (for example, a series of pictures, First Peoples oral histories, personal stories, skits, student-created stories)
  • Recognize the importance of story in personal, family, and community identity: First Peoples stories express their perspectives, values, beliefs, worldviews, and knowledge
  • Engage in short conversations: with peers, teachers, and members of the wider community; can include virtual/online conversations
  • regional variations in French: for example, idiomatic expressions from across la francophonie
  • creative works: for example, books, dance, paintings, pictures, poems, songs
  • Francophone communities, people or experiences: for example, blogs, classroom and school visits (including virtual/online visits), concerts, exchanges, festivals, films, pen-pal letters, plays, social media, stores/restaurants with service in French
  • texts: Text is defined as any piece of oral, visual, or written communication. Texts may be delivered through many different modes, such as face-to-face communication, audio and video recordings, print materials, or digital media. Examples of texts include but are not limited to:

    advertisements, articles, biographies, blogs, brochures, cartoons, charts, conversations, diagrams, emails, essays, films, First Peoples oral histories, forms, graphs, instructions, interviews, invitations, legends, letters, myths, narratives, news reports, novels, nursery rhymes, online profiles, paintings, photographs, picture books, poems, presentations, songs, speeches, stories, surveys, and text messages

    Teachers are encouraged to use a wide range of grade-appropriate text types in their classrooms.

    Teachers may choose to use adapted or modified Francophone texts with their students.

    Purposes for using adapted texts include: 

    - to increase student comprehension (e.g., by simplifying the text) 
    - to increase student exposure to target vocabulary and patterns (e.g., by repeating key vocabulary or grammatical structures throughout a text) 
    - to increase the saliency of high-frequency vocabulary and patterns (e.g., by underlining, bolding, or highlighting)
Concepts and Content: 
  • increasing range of commonly used vocabulary and sentence structures for conveying meaning:
    • asking and responding to various types of questions
    • describing activities, situations, and events
    • expressing different degrees of likes and dislikes
    • expressing hopes, dreams, desires, and ambitions
    • expressing opinions
  • past, present, and future timeframes
  • elements of a variety of common texts
  • common elements of stories
  • idiomatic expressions from across la francophonie
  • contributions of Francophone Canadians to society
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • various types of questions: including inversion questions; for example, As-tu un crayon?; Va-t-il au cinéma?; Aimez-vous ce livre?
  • describing activities, situations, and events: using appropriate tenses (e.g., le future proche, le future simple, le conditionnel) in both the affirmative and the negative
  • expressing different degrees of likes and dislikes: for example, J’aime…; J’aime bien…; J’adore…; Je n’aime pas…; Je n’aime pas du tout…; Je déteste
  • expressing hopes, dreams, desires, and ambitions: for example, Je veux…; J’aimerai…; Je vais…; J’aurai…; Je finirai…
  • past, present, and future timeframes: Students should be able to understand and express past, present, and future tenses of regular and irregular verbs in context; differentiate between le passé composé and l’imparfait
  • elements: for example, format (letter vs. email message), language, context, audience, register (informal vs. formal), purpose
  • common elements: for example, place, characters, setting, plot, problem and resolution
  • stories: Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and fictional or non-fictional (for example, a series of pictures, First Peoples oral histories, personal stories, skits, student-created stories)
  • idiomatic expressions from across la francophonie: from, for example, le patois, le verlan, l’argot; jokes, French expressions derived from Arabic; expressions such as jaser for bavarder; expressions with avoir, faire, être (e.g., avoir tort, faire froid, être en retard)
  • texts: Text is defined as any piece of oral, visual, or written communication. Texts may be delivered through many different modes, such as face-to-face communication, audio and video recordings, print materials, or digital media. Examples of texts include but are not limited to:

    advertisements, articles, biographies, blogs, brochures, cartoons, charts, conversations, diagrams, emails, essays, films, First Peoples oral histories, forms, graphs, instructions, interviews, invitations, legends, letters, myths, narratives, news reports, novels, nursery rhymes, online profiles, paintings, photographs, picture books, poems, presentations, songs, speeches, stories, surveys, and text messages

    Teachers are encouraged to use a wide range of grade-appropriate text types in their classrooms.

    Teachers may choose to use adapted or modified Francophone texts with their students. Purposes for using adapted texts include:
    • to increase student comprehension (e.g., by simplifying the text)
    • to increase student exposure to target vocabulary and patterns (e.g., by repeating key vocabulary or grammatical structures throughout a text)
    • to increase the saliency of high-frequency vocabulary and patterns (e.g., by underlining, bolding, or highlighting)
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
L’écoute et le visionnement attentifs nous permettent de progresser dans la compréhension et l’acquisition du français.
S’exprimer et converser en français exige du courage et une prise
de risque.
L’acquisition d’une nouvelle langue peut façonner le point de vue, l’identité et les opinions d’une personne.
L’acquisition d’une nouvelle langue nous donne des occasions d’apprécier et de valoriser des œuvres de création et la diversité culturelle.
L’acquisition  du français permet d’interagir avec le monde francophone.
L’acquisition du français ouvre la voie à des possibilités de carrière, de voyages, de croissance personnelle et d’études à l’étranger.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • œuvres de création : par exemple, livres, danses, peintures, illustrations, poèmes, chansons
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser un nombre croissant de stratégies pour dégager et approfondir le sens
  • Reconnaître que le choix des mots influe sur le sens
  • Dégager le sens de plusieurs types de textes
  • Trouver et étudier divers médias francophones en ligne
  • Raconter des histoires oralement et par écrit
  • Reconnaître l’importance des histoires dans la construction de l’identité personnelle, familiale et communautaire
  • Avoir de brèves conversations
  • S’exprimer avec de plus en plus d’aisance, oralement et par écrit :
    • répondre à diverses questions et en poser à son tour
    • décrire des situations, des activités quotidiennes et des séries d’événements
    • indiquer dans quelle mesure il aime ou n’aime pas un objet ou une activité
    • parler de ses attentes, de ses rêves, de ses désirs et de ses ambitions
    • exprimer ses opinions sur des sujets familiers
  • Reconnaître qu’il existe des variations régionales du français
  • Prendre conscience de la façon dont l’identité culturelle francophone s’exprime grâce à des œuvres de création et à des textes
  • Reconnaître les apports des Franco-Canadiens à la société
  • S’impliquer avec des personnes ou dans des communautés, ou avoir des expériences de vie, au sein du monde francophone
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • stratégies pour dégager et approfondir le sens : par exemple, employer la circonlocution, paraphraser, reformuler, réitérer, répéter, remplacer un mot; interpréter le langage corporel, les expressions, le ton, les indices contextuels, les mots familiers
  • choix des mots : par exemple, une langue plus ou moins soutenue, un style plus ou moins direct, le choix des temps et des modes verbaux
  • dégager le sens : comprendre les éléments clés, les détails complémentaires, le temps et le lieu
  • divers médias francophones en ligne : par exemple, articles, blogues, dessins animés, musique, médias d’information, vidéos
  • raconter : employer les expressions servant à exprimer le temps et les mots de transition courants marquant une progression logique; utiliser le présent, le passé et le futur
  • histoires : il peut s’agir d’histoires orales, écrites ou visuelles, fictives ou non fictives (p. ex. une série d’images, les récits de la tradition orale des peuples autochtones, des anecdotes personnelles, des saynètes, des histoires conçues par les élèves).
  • reconnaître l’importance des histoires dans la construction de l’identité personnelle, familiale et communautaire : les récits oraux des peuples autochtones véhiculent les points de vue, les valeurs, les croyances, les visions du monde et les savoirs de ces derniers
  • avoir de brèves conversations : avec ses pairs, ses enseignants et des membres de sa communauté; cela peut comprendre les conversations en ligne ou virtuelles
  • variations régionales du français : par exemple, expressions idiomatiques provenant d’un peu partout dans la francophonie
  • œuvres de création : par exemple, livres, danses, peintures, illustrations, poèmes, chansons
  • S’impliquer avec des personnes ou dans des communautés, ou avoir des expériences de vie, au sein du monde francophone : par exemple, blogues, visites de classes et d’écoles (y compris les visites en ligne ou virtuelles), concerts, échanges, festivals, films, relations épistolaires (correspondants), pièces de théâtre, médias sociaux, magasins ou restaurants offrant un service en français
  • Textes : toute communication orale, visuelle ou écrite. Un texte peut prendre différentes formes : communication en personne, enregistrement audio ou vidéo, document imprimé ou média numérique. Voici quelques exemples de textes : annonces publicitaires, articles, bandes dessinées, biographies, blogues, brochures, chansons, comptines, conversations, courriels, diagrammes, discours, entrevues, films, formulaires, graphiques, histoires, instructions, invitations, légendes, lettres, livres d’images, mythes, peintures, photos, poèmes, présentations, profils en ligne, récits, récits de la tradition orale des peuples autochtones, rédactions, reportages, romans, sondages, tableaux et textos.  On encourage les enseignants à présenter à leurs élèves une grande variété de textes correspondant à leur niveau scolaire. Les enseignants peuvent choisir de présenter à leurs élèves du matériel en français, authentique ou adapté. Les textes peuvent être adaptés notamment pour : - les rendre plus compréhensibles pour les élèves (p. ex. en les simplifiant);- exposer davantage les élèves à du vocabulaire ou à des structures spécifiques (p. ex. en répétant dans un texte des mots ou des structures grammaticales clés);- mettre en évidence les structures et le vocabulaire usuels (p. ex. en les soulignant, en les mettant en caractères gras ou en les surlignant).
content_fr: 
  • une gamme croissante de mots de vocabulaire et de structures de phrase usuels pour communiquer :
    • les réponses à différents types de questions et en poser à son tour
    • des descriptions d’activités, de situations et d’événements
    • dans quelle mesure il aime ou n’aime pas quelque chose
    • ses attentes, ses rêves, ses désirs et ses ambitions
    • ses opinions
  • les formes du présent, du passé et du futur
  • les composantes de divers types de textes courants
  • les composantes de base des histoires
  • des expressions idiomatiques provenant d’un peu partout dans la francophonie
  • des apports fournis par des Franco-Canadiens à la société
content elaborations fr: 
  • différents types de questions : y compris l’inversion verbe-sujet dans les phrases interrogatives; par exemple, As-tu un crayon?; Va-t-il au cinéma?; Aimez-vous ce livre?
  • descriptions d’activités, de situations et d’événements : employer les temps verbaux appropriés (p. ex.  futur proche, futur simple, conditionnel) à la forme affirmative et négative
  • dans quelle mesure il aime ou n’aime pas quelque chose : par exemple, J’aime…; J’aime bien…; J’adore…; Je n’aime pas…; Je n’aime pas du tout…; Je déteste
  • ses attentes, ses rêves, ses désirs et ses ambitions: par exemple, Je veux…; J’aimerai…; Je vais…; J’aurai…; Je finirai
  • formes du présent, du passé et du futur : L’élève devrait être en mesure de comprendre et d’exprimer, en contexte, le passé, le présent et le futur des verbes réguliers et irréguliers, et de différencier le passé composé de l’imparfait.
  • composantes : par exemple, support (lettre papier ou courriel), langage, contexte, public visé, registre de langue (soutenu ou familier), raison d’être
  • composantes de base : par exemple, lieu, personnages, cadre général, intrigue, problème et résolution
  • histoires : il peut s’agir d’histoires orales, écrites ou visuelles, fictives ou non fictives (p. ex. une série d’images, les récits de la tradition orale des peuples autochtones, des anecdotes personnelles, des saynètes, des histoires conçues par les élèves).
  • expressions idiomatiques provenant d’un peu partout dans la francophonie : par exemple, des expressions issues d’un patois, du verlan, d’un argot; des blagues, des expressions dérivées de l’arabe; des expressions telles que jaser plutôt que bavarder; des expressions construites avec les verbes avoir, faire, être (p. ex.  avoir tort, faire froid, être en retard)
  • Textes : toute communication orale, visuelle ou écrite. Un texte peut prendre différentes formes : communication en personne, enregistrement audio ou vidéo, document imprimé ou média numérique. Voici quelques exemples de textes :

    annonces publicitaires, articles, bandes dessinées, biographies, blogues, brochures, chansons, comptines, conversations, courriels, diagrammes, discours, entrevues, films, formulaires, graphiques, histoires, instructions, invitations, légendes, lettres, livres d’images, mythes, peintures, photos, poèmes, présentations, profils en ligne, récits, récits de la tradition orale des peuples autochtones, rédactions, reportages, romans, sondages, tableaux et textos.

    On encourage les enseignants à présenter à leurs élèves une grande variété de textes correspondant à leur niveau scolaire.

    Les enseignants peuvent choisir de présenter à leurs élèves du matériel en français, authentique ou adapté. Les textes peuvent être adaptés notamment pour :

    - les rendre plus compréhensibles pour les élèves (p. ex. en les simplifiant);
    - exposer davantage les élèves à du vocabulaire ou à des structures spécifiques (p. ex. en répétant dans un texte des mots ou des structures grammaticales clés);
    - mettre en évidence les structures et le vocabulaire usuels (p. ex. en les soulignant, en les mettant en caractères gras ou en les surlignant).