Curriculum Core French Grade 12

Subject: 
Core French
Grade: 
Grade 12
Big Ideas: 
Acquiring a language is a lifelong process.
With increased proficiency in French, we can discuss and justify opinions with nuance and clarity.
Sharing our feelings, opinions, and beliefs in French contributes to our identity as a French speaker.
Appreciation of Francophone culture allows us to understand and explore global issues with greater awareness.
Experiencing the creative works of other cultures helps us develop our appreciation of cultures worldwide.
Becoming more proficient in French allows us to explore career, travel, personal growth, and study abroad opportunities.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • creative works: for example, books, dance, paintings, pictures, poems, songs
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Derive and negotiate meaning in a wide variety of contexts
  • Locate and explore a variety of authentic texts in French
  • Explore and interpret a wide variety of texts
  • Recognize different purposes, degrees of formality, and cultural points of view in a variety of texts
  • Identify and explain biases in texts
  • Respond personally to a variety of texts
  • Narrate stories orally and in writing
  • Engage in conversations on a variety of topics of interest, orally and in writing
  • Adjust their speech and writing to reflect different purposes and degrees of formality
  • Express themselves effectively, with fluency and accuracy, orally and in writing:
    • express doubts, wishes, possibilities, and hypotheticals
    • express and explain needs and emotions
    • express, support, and defend opinions on a variety of topics of interest
    • synthesize, evaluate, and respond to the opinions of others
  • Analyze and compare elements of creative works from diverse communities
  • Recognize and explain connections between language and culture
  • Recognize that language and culture have been influenced by the interactions between First Peoples and Francophone communities in Canada
  • Engage with Francophone communities, people, or experiences
  • Identify and explore opportunities to continue language acquisition beyond graduation
  • Identify and explore career opportunities requiring proficiency in French
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • contexts: for example, contexts differing in terms of audience, purpose, setting, formal vs. informal
  • Locate: Students are expected to search for various types of Francophone texts themselves
  • purposes: for example, to convince, inform, entertain
  • biases: Texts often reflect the personal points of view of the author, which can sometimes be arbitrary or prejudiced
  • Respond personally: for example, provide personal interpretations, opinions
  • Narrate stories: using expressions of time and transitional words to show logical progression; using multiple timeframes
  • Engage in conversations: with peers, teachers, and members of the wider community; can include virtual/online conversations and social media
  • topics of interest: personal, local, regional, national, or global topics of interest, such as current events, matters of public debate, political issues, social trends
  • Express themselves effectively with fluency and accuracy: includes using the full range of tenses and moods, developing flow, employing precise vocabulary, and using appropriate structures
  • creative works: for example, books, dance, paintings, pictures, poems, songs
  • diverse communities: Francophone, Aboriginal, and other communities
  • connections between language and culture: as expressed through, for example, creative works (e.g., books, dance, paintings, pictures, poems, songs), regional dialects, historical origins of words and expressions
  • Recognize that language and culture have been influenced by the interactions between First Peoples and Francophone communities in Canada: For example, the Michif language, which includes Aboriginal and French vocabulary and structures, expresses a distinctive Métis culture.
  • Francophone communities, people, or experiences: for example, blogs, classroom and school visits (including virtual/online visits), concerts, exchanges, festivals, films, pen-pal letters, plays, social media, stores/restaurants with service in French
  • opportunities to continue language acquisition beyond graduation: for example, clubs, meet-ups, online resources, personal connections, travel, volunteering
  • texts: Text is defined as any piece of oral, visual, or written communication. Texts may be delivered through many different modes, such as face-to-face communication, audio and video recordings, print materials, or digital media. Examples of texts include but are not limited to:

    advertisements, articles, biographies, blogs, brochures, cartoons, charts, conversations, diagrams, emails, essays, films, First Peoples oral histories, forms, graphs, instructions, interviews, invitations, legends, letters, myths, narratives, news reports, novels, nursery rhymes, online profiles, paintings, photographs, picture books, poems, presentations, songs, speeches, stories, surveys, and text messages

    Teachers are encouraged to use a wide range of grade-appropriate text types in their classrooms.

    Teachers may choose to use authentic or adapted Francophone texts with their students. Purposes for using adapted texts include:

    - to increase student comprehension (e.g., by simplifying the text)
    - to increase student exposure to target vocabulary and patterns (e.g., by repeating key vocabulary or grammatical structures throughout a text)
    - to increase the saliency of high-frequency vocabulary and patterns (e.g., by underlining, bolding, or highlighting)
Concepts and Content: 
  • a wider range of increasingly complex vocabulary and sentence structures for communicating meaning:
    • asking and responding to a wide range of complex questions
    • sequencing events in stories
    • expressing doubts, wishes, possibilities, and hypotheticals
    • expressing needs
    • explaining emotions
    • expressing, supporting, and defending opinions
  • multiple forms of past, present, and future timeframes
  • register and language etiquette
  • distinguishing features of major French regional dialects
  • where to access French resources and services
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • sequencing events: using appropriate verb tenses and expressions of time; for example, premièrement, deuxièmement, ensuite, finalement, après 30 minutes, une heure plus tard, le lendemain
  • stories: Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and fictional or non-fictional (for example, a series of pictures, First Peoples oral histories, personal stories, skits, student-created stories)
  • expressing doubts, wishes, possibilities, and hypotheticals: using l’indicatif, le subjonctif, and le conditionnel moods; for example, Je ne pense pas que…; Je doute que…; J’espère que…; J’aimerais…; Il est possible que
  • expressing needs: for example, J’ai besoin de…; Il faut que…
  • explaining emotions: for example, Je suis triste que…
  • multiple forms of past, present, and future timeframes: with attention to nuances among tenses and moods, including le passé composé, l’imparfait, le plus-que-parfait, le passé simple, le conditionnel, and le subjonctif
  • register and language etiquette: elements of formal vs. informal speech and writing; for example, cela vs. ça; que l’on vs. qu’on; etiquette, such as addressing people they have not met as monsieur or madame + surname/title (e.g., monsieur le directeur); use of topic-specific jargon, abbreviations, and txt spk (e.g., mdr = mort de rire [LOL]; @+ = à plus tard; cad = c’est-à-dire; bp de = beaucoup de; qqn = quelqu’un; qqch = quelque chose)
  • distinguishing features of major French regional dialects: for example, accents, idiomatic expressions, local slang vocabulary
  • resources and services: for example, l’annuaire, blogs, courses, clubs, community centres, newspapers, magazines, online resources
  • texts: Text is defined as any piece of oral, visual, or written communication. Texts may be delivered through many different modes, such as face-to-face communication, audio and video recordings, print materials, or digital media. Examples of texts include but are not limited to:

    advertisements, articles, biographies, blogs, brochures, cartoons, charts, conversations, diagrams, emails, essays, films, First Peoples oral histories, forms, graphs, instructions, interviews, invitations, legends, letters, myths, narratives, news reports, novels, nursery rhymes, online profiles, paintings, photographs, picture books, poems, presentations, songs, speeches, stories, surveys, and text messages

    Teachers are encouraged to use a wide range of grade-appropriate text types in their classrooms.

    Teachers may choose to use authentic or adapted Francophone texts with their students. Purposes for using adapted texts include:
    • to increase student comprehension (e.g., by simplifying the text)
    • to increase student exposure to target vocabulary and patterns (e.g., by repeating key vocabulary or grammatical structures throughout a text)
    • to increase the saliency of high-frequency vocabulary and patterns (e.g., by underlining, bolding, or highlighting)
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
L’acquisition d’une langue est un processus qui continue toute la vie.
Lorsque notre niveau de français est suffisamment élevé, nous pouvons discuter de nos opinions et les justifier de manière claire et nuancée.
Le fait d’exprimer en français nos sentiments, nos opinions et nos croyances contribue à construire notre identité comme locuteur du français.
Le fait d’apprécier la culture francophone nous permet de comprendre et d’explorer les enjeux mondiaux en étant mieux conscientisés.
Grâce à l’étude d’œuvres de création d’autres cultures, nous pouvons mieux apprécier les cultures du monde.
Développer sa maîtrise du français nous permet d’explorer des possibilités d’emploi, de voyage, de croissance personnelle et d’études à l’étranger.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • œuvres de création : par exemple, livres, danses, peintures, illustrations, poèmes, chansons
competencies_fr: 
  • Dégager et approfondir le sens dans une grande variété de contextes
  • Trouver et étudier plusieurs types de textes originaux en français
  • Étudier et interpréter un large éventail de textes
  • Reconnaître différents buts recherchés, degrés de formalité et points de vue culturels dans une multitude de textes
  • Déceler et expliquer des cas de partialité dans des textes
  • Réagir de manière personnelle à divers textes
  • Raconter des histoires oralement et par écrit
  • Avoir des conversations sur plusieurs sujets d’intérêts, oralement et par écrit
  • Modifier sa façon de s’exprimer, oralement et par écrit, selon les différents buts et degrés de formalité recherchés
  • S’exprimer efficacement, avec aisance et exactitude, oralement et par écrit :
    • parler de ses doutes, de ses désirs, de ses possibilités et de ses  hypothèses
    • exprimer et expliquer ses besoins et ses émotions
    • exprimer, soutenir et défendre ses opinions sur divers sujets d’intérêt
    • résumer et évaluer les opinions d’autres personnes et y réagir
  • Analyser et comparer entre eux des éléments d’œuvres de création provenant de diverses communautés
  • Reconnaître et expliquer les liens entre la langue et la culture
  • Reconnaître l’influence des interactions entre les communautés autochtones et celles des francophones sur la langue et la culture au Canada
  • S’impliquer avec des personnes ou dans des communautés, ou avoir des expériences de vie, au sein du monde francophone
  • Recenser et explorer des occasions de poursuivre l’apprentissage du français après l’obtention du diplôme d’études secondaires
  • Répertorier des professions ou des parcours d’études qui nécessitent la maîtrise du français
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • contextes : par exemple, le public, le but, le cadre général, le registre de langue (soutenu ou familier) peut varier selon les contextes
  • trouver : on s’attend à ce que l’élève cherche lui-même différents types de textes en français
  • buts : par exemple, convaincre, informer, divertir
  • partialité : les textes reflètent souvent les points de vue des auteurs, qui peuvent parfois être arbitraires ou empreints de préjugés
  • réagir de manière personnelle : par exemple, formuler des interprétations ou des opinions personnelles
  • raconter des histoires : employer les expressions servant à exprimer le temps et les mots de transition courants marquant une progression logique; utiliser divers temps de verbe
  • avoir des conversations : avec ses pairs, ses enseignants et des membres de sa communauté; cela peut comprendre les conversations en ligne ou virtuelles et celles ayant lieu par l’intermédiaire de médias sociaux
  • sujets d’intérêt : questions retenant l’attention sur le plan personnel, ou  à l’échelle locale, régionale, nationale ou mondiale, comme les événements
  • de l’actualité, les sujets de débat public, les problèmes politiques et les tendances sociales
  • s’exprimer efficacement, avec aisance et exactitude : par exemple, utiliser tous les temps et modes verbaux, avoir un débit de parole plus régulier, employer les termes justes et les bonnes structures de phrases
  • œuvres de création : par exemple, livres, danses, peintures, illustrations, poèmes, chansons
  • diverses communautés : francophones, autochtones et autres
  • liens entre la langue et la culture : transparaissant, notamment, dans les œuvres de création (p. ex.  livres, danses, peintures, illustrations, poèmes, chansons), les dialectes régionaux, et les origines historiques de mots ou d’expressions
  • reconnaître l’influence des interactions entre les communautés autochtones et francophones au Canada sur la langue et la culture : par exemple, le michif, une langue qui comprend des mots et des structures grammaticales issus du français et de langues autochtones, reflète une culture métisse distincte
  • s’impliquer avec des personnes ou dans des communautés, ou avoir des expériences de vie, au sein du monde francophone : par exemple, blogues, visites de classes et d’écoles (incluant les visites en ligne ou virtuelles), concerts, échanges, festivals, films, relations épistolaires (correspondants), pièces de théâtre, médias sociaux, magasins ou restaurants offrant un service en français
  • occasions de poursuivre l’apprentissage du français après l’obtention du diplôme d’études secondaires : par exemple, clubs sociaux, rencontres, ressources en ligne, relations personnelles, voyages, bénévolat
  • Textes : toute communication orale, visuelle ou écrite. Un texte peut prendre différentes formes : communication en personne, enregistrement audio ou vidéo, document imprimé ou média numérique. Voici quelques exemples de textes : annonces publicitaires, articles, bandes dessinées, biographies, blogues, brochures, chansons, comptines, conversations, courriels, diagrammes, discours, entrevues, films, formulaires, graphiques, histoires, instructions, invitations, légendes, lettres, livres d’images, mythes, peintures, photos, poèmes, présentations, profils en ligne, récits, récits de la tradition orale des peuples autochtones, rédactions, reportages, romans, sondages, tableaux et textos.  On encourage les enseignants à présenter à leurs élèves une grande variété de textes correspondant à leur niveau scolaire. Les enseignants peuvent choisir de présenter à leurs élèves du matériel en français, authentique ou adapté. Les textes peuvent être adaptés notamment pour : - les rendre plus compréhensibles pour les élèves (p. ex. en les simplifiant);- exposer davantage les élèves à du vocabulaire ou à des structures spécifiques (p. ex. en répétant dans un texte des mots ou des structures grammaticales clés);- mettre en évidence les structures et le vocabulaire usuels (p. ex. en les soulignant, en les mettant en caractères gras ou en les surlignant).
content_fr: 
  • un éventail élargi de mots de vocabulaire et de structures de phrase de plus en plus complexes pour communiquer :
    • les réponses à une vaste gamme de questions complexes et en poser à son tour
    • un enchaînement d’événements dans des histoires
    • ses doutes, ses désirs, des possibilités et des hypothèses
    • ses besoins
    • des explications concernant ses émotions
    • l’expression, le soutien et la défense de ses opinions
  • les multiples formes du présent, du passé et du futur
  • le registre de langue et les marques de courtoisie
  • les caractéristiques qui permettent de distinguer les principaux dialectes régionaux du français
  • les endroits où trouver des ressources et des services en français
content elaborations fr: 
  • enchaînement d’événements : employer les temps de verbe et les connecteurs temporels appropriés; par exemple, premièrement, deuxièmement, ensuite, finalement, après 30 minutes, une heure plus tard, le lendemain
  • histoires : il peut s’agir d’histoires orales, écrites ou visuelles, fictives ou non fictives (p. ex. une série d’images, les récits de la tradition orale des peuples autochtones, des anecdotes personnelles, des saynètes, des histoires conçues par les élèves).
  • ses doutes, ses désirs, des possibilités, des hypothèses : employer l’indicatif, le subjonctif et le conditionnel; par exemple, Je ne pense pas que…; Je doute que…; J’espère que…; J’aimerais…; Il est possible que…
  • ses besoins : par exemple, J’ai besoin de…; Il faut que…
  • explications concernant ses émotions : par exemple, Je suis triste que…
  • multiples formes du présent, du passé et du futur : prêter attention aux nuances apportées par les temps et les modes verbaux, dont le passé composé, l’imparfait, le plus-que-parfait, le passé simple, le conditionnel, et le subjonctif
  • registre de langue et marques de courtoisie : les éléments des registres soutenu et familier (langue écrite ou parlée); par exemple, cela et ça, que l’on et qu’on; les marques de courtoisie, notamment, s’adresser à une personne que l’on ne connaît pas en utilisant le terme de politesse monsieur ou madame et son nom de famille ou son titre (p. ex.  monsieur le directeur); l’emploi du jargon propre à un domaine, les abréviations et la langue des textos (p. ex.  mdr = mort de rire [LOL]; @+ = à plus tard; cad = c’est-à-dire; bp de = beaucoup de; qqn = quelqu’un; qqch = quelque chose)
  • caractéristiques qui permettent de distinguer les principaux dialectes régionaux du français : par exemple, les accents, les expressions idiomatiques et le vocabulaire de la langue populaire locale
  • ressources et des services : par exemple, annuaire, blogues, cours, clubs sociaux, centres communautaires, journaux, magazines, ressources en ligne
PDF Only: 
No
PDF Grade-Set: 
5-12
Curriculum Status: 
2019/20