Curriculum Comparative Cultures Grade 12

Subject: 
Comparative Cultures
Grade: 
Grade 12
Big Ideas: 
Understanding the diversity and complexity of cultural expressions in one culture enhances our understanding of other cultures.
Interactions between belief systems, social organization, and languages influence artistic expressions of culture.
Geographic and environmental factors influenced the development of agriculture, trade, and increasingly complex cultures.
Value systems and belief systems shape the structures of power and authority within a culture.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess and compare the significance of cultural expressions at particular times and places (significance)
  • Evaluate inferences about the content, origins, purposes, context, reliability, and usefulness of multiple sources from the past and present (evidence)
  • Analyze continuities and changes in diverse cultures at different times and places (continuity and change)
  • Assess the development and impact of the thought, artistic expressions, power and authority, and technological adaptations of diverse cultures (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past and present cultures (perspective)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present, and assess appropriate ways to remember and respond (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Draw conclusions about a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Assess and defend a variety of positions on a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Demonstrate leadership by planning, implementing, and assessing strategies to address a problem or an issue.
      • Identify and clarify a problem or issue.
      • Evaluate and organize collected data (e.g., in outlines, summaries, notes, timelines, charts).
      • Interpret information and data from a variety of maps, graphs, and tables.
      • Interpret and present data in a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, and graphic).
      • Accurately cite sources.
      • Construct graphs, tables, and maps to communicate ideas and information, demonstrating appropriate use of grids, scales, legends, and contours.
  • Assess and compare the significance of cultural expressions at particular times and places (historical significance):
    • Key questions:
      • What factors can cause people, places, events, or developments to become more or less significant?
      • What factors can make people, places, events, or developments significant to different people?
      • What criteria should be used to assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments?
    • Sample activities:
      • Use criteria to rank the most important people, places, events, or developments in the current unit of study.
      • Compare how different groups assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments.
  • Evaluate inferences about the content, origins, purposes, context, reliability, and usefulness of multiple sources from the past and present (evidence):
    • Key questions:
      • What criteria should be used to assess the reliability of a source?
      • How much evidence is sufficient in order to support a conclusion?
      • How much about various people, places, events, or developments can be known and how much is unknowable?
    • Sample activities:
      • Compare and contrast multiple accounts of the same event and evaluate their usefulness as historical sources.
      • Examine what sources are available and what sources are missing and evaluate how the available evidence shapes your perspective on the people, places, events, or developments studied.
  • Analyze continuities and changes in diverse cultures at different times and places (continuity and change):
    • Key questions:
      • What factors lead to changes or continuities affecting groups of people differently?
      • How do gradual processes and more sudden rates of change affect people living through them? Which method of change has more of an effect on society?
      • How are periods of change or continuity perceived by the people living through them? How does this compare to how they are perceived after the fact?
    • Sample activity:
      • Compare how different groups benefited or suffered as a result of a particular change.
  • Explain different perspectives on past and present cultures (perspective):
    • Key questions:
      • What sources of information can people today use to try to understand what people in different times and places believed?
      • How much can we generalize about values and beliefs in a given society or time period?
      • Is it fair to judge people of the past using modern values?
    • Sample activity:
      • Explain how the beliefs of people on different sides of the same issue influence their opinions. 
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present, and assess appropriate ways to remember and respond (ethical judgment):
    • Key questions:
      • What is the difference between implicit and explicit values?
      • Why should we consider the historical, political, and social context when making ethical judgments?
      • Should people of today have any responsibilities for actions taken in the past?
      • Can people of the past be celebrated for great achievements if they have also done things considered unethical today? 
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess the responsibility of historical figures for an important event. Assess how much responsibility should be assigned to different people, and evaluate whether their actions were justified given the historical context.
      • Examine various media sources on a topic and assess how much of the language contains implicit and explicit moral judgments.
Concepts and Content: 
  • definitions of culture and how these have changed over time
  • elements of culture and cultural expressions
  • conflict and conflict resolution within and between cultures
  • systems of power, authority, and governance
  • role of value systems and belief systems in the development of cultures
  • interactions and exchanges between cultures
  • interactions between cultures and the natural environment
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • definitions of culture and how these have changed over time:
    • Sample topics:
      • terminology such as “civilized” and “uncivilized”
      • different perspectives when defining culture
  • elements of culture and cultural expressions:
    • Sample topics:
      • language
      • key forms of artistic expression
      • use of symbols and imagery
      • cultural archetypes
      • materials and techniques used by different cultures
  • conflict and conflict resolution within and between cultures:
    • Sample topics:
      • conquest of territory and the treatment of conquered people
      • martial alliances and diplomacy
      • conflicts over values or ideas
      • conflicts over resources and wealth
  • systems of power, authority, and governance:
    • Sample topics:
      • leadership roles within cultures
      • informal and formal leadership
      • institutions of authority
      • process for making and enforcing laws
  • role of value systems and belief systems in the development of cultures:
    • Sample topics:
      • religious doctrines
      • values and morals
      • philosophical beliefs
      • myths, legends, and heroes
  • interactions and exchanges between cultures:
    • Sample topics:
      • exchanges of ideas and cultural transmission
      • spread of technologies
      • spread of religion and philosophy
      • land-based and sea-based trade between cultures
  • interactions between cultures and the natural environment:
    • Sample topics:
      • climate and native plants and animals
      • natural resources and economic development
      • human adaptation to the physical environment:
        • Polynesian wayfinders’ use of ocean currents
        • Cree seasonal hunting practices
        • fish farming in B.C.
        • transportation issues in local urban development
    • degrees of separation between the physical environment and cultural world:
      • San people’s relationship to water
      • Canadian First Peoples community water supplies
      • protection of waterways in central/northern B.C.
      • local urban life and bottled water usage
    • interdependence of cultural identity and the physical environment:
      • Yanomamo group identity and hunting practices in the Amazon
      • Newfoundlanders, fishing, and identity
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Comprendre la diversité et la complexité des expressions culturelles dans une culture donnée nous aide à mieux comprendre les autres cultures.
Les interactions entre systèmes de croyance, organisation sociale et langues influencent les expressions artistiques d’une culture.
Les facteurs géographiques et écologiques ont influencé le développement de l’agriculture et du commerce et l’évolution de cultures de plus en plus complexes.
Les systèmes de valeurs et de croyances façonnent les structures de pouvoir et d’autorité au sein d’une culture.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d'investigation liées à l'étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions
  • Déterminer et comparer l'importance des expressions culturelles à des époques et en des lieux donnés (portée)
  • Évaluer les conclusions quant aux éléments de contenu, aux origines, aux objectifs, au contexte, à la fiabilité et à l'utilité de sources multiples du passé et du présent (preuves)
  • Analyser les éléments de continuité et de changement dans diverses cultures à une époque et en un lieu donnés (continuité et changement)
  • Évaluer le développement et l'impact de la pensée, des expressions artistiques, du pouvoir, de l'autorité, et des adaptations technologiques de diverses cultures (cause et conséquence)
  • Expliquer différents points de vue sur les cultures du passé et du présent (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent, et déterminer des façons adéquates de les évoquer et d'y réagir (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d'investigation liées à l'étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions :
    • Compétences clés :
      • Tirer des conclusions sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Évaluer et défendre divers points de vue sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Faire preuve d'initiative en planifiant, en adoptant et en évaluant des stratégies pour aborder un problème ou un enjeu
      • Relever et clarifier un problème ou un enjeu
      • Évaluer et organiser les données recueillies (p. ex. à partir de plans, de sommaires, de notes, de schémas chronologiques, de tableaux)
      • Interpréter l'information et les données provenant de cartes, graphiques et tableaux divers
      • Interpréter et présenter de l'information ou des données sous diverses formes (p. ex. orale, écrite et graphique)
      • Citer ses sources avec exactitude
      • Préparer des graphiques, des tableaux et des cartes pour communiquer des idées et de l'information, en démontrant un usage approprié des grilles, des échelles, des légendes et des courbes
  • Déterminer et comparer l'importance des expressions culturelles à des époques et en des lieux donnés (portée) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels sont les facteurs qui font en sorte que les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses revêtent une importance plus ou moins grande?
      • Quels sont les facteurs qui déterminent l'importance que diverses personnes accordent aux autres, aux lieux, aux événements ou au cours des choses?
      • Quels critères devrait-on appliquer pour évaluer l'importance des personnes, des lieux, des événements et du cours des choses?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Utiliser des critères pour attribuer différents degrés d'importance aux personnes, aux lieux, aux événements et au cours des choses dans le cadre de l'unité d'apprentissage actuelle
      • Comparer la façon dont divers groupes évaluent l'importance des personnes, des lieux, des événements ou du cours des choses
  • Évaluer les conclusions quant aux éléments de contenu, aux origines, aux objectifs, au contexte, à la fiabilité et à l'utilité de sources multiples du passé et du présent (preuves) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels critères devrait-on appliquer pour évaluer la fiabilité d'une source?
      • Combien de preuves sont suffisantes pour étayer une conclusion?
      • Quelle part des personnes, des lieux, des événements et du cours des choses peut-on connaître et quelle part est-il impossible de connaître?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Comparer et contraster les comptes rendus multiples d'un même événement et évaluer leur utilité à titre de sources historiques
      • Déterminer quelles sont les sources accessibles et les sources manquantes, et l'influence des preuves disponibles sur le point de vue que nous avons sur les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses à l'étude
  • Analyser les éléments de continuité et de changement dans diverses cultures à une époque et en un lieu donnés (continuité et changement) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels facteurs mènent à des situations de continuité ou de changement qui affectent différemment divers groupes?
      • Comment les processus graduels et les changements plus soudains affectent-ils les personnes qui les vivent? Quel processus de changement exerce plus d'effet sur la société?
      • Comment perçoit-on les périodes de continuité ou de changement lorsqu'on les vit par opposition à après coup?
    • Exemple d'activités :
      • Comparer la façon dont différents groupes ont profité d'un changement particulier ou en ont été éprouvés
  • Expliquer différents points de vue sur les cultures du passé et du présent (perspective) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles sources d'information peut-on aujourd'hui utiliser pour essayer de comprendre ce que croyaient les gens de diverses époques et divers lieux?
      • Jusqu'à quel point peut-on généraliser les valeurs et les croyances d'une société ou d'une époque donnée?
      • Est-il équitable de juger les personnes du passé en utilisant des valeurs modernes?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Expliquer comment des personnes qui divergent d'opinion sur un même enjeu peuvent être influencées par leurs croyances
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent, et déterminer des façons adéquates de les évoquer et d'y réagir (jugement éthique) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelle est la différence entre valeurs implicites et valeurs explicites?
      • Pourquoi devrait-on tenir compte du contexte historique, politique et social lorsque l'on porte des jugements éthiques?
      • Doit-on aujourd'hui assumer la responsabilité pour les actions du passé?
      • Doit-on célébrer les personnages historiques pour leurs réalisations s'ils ont aussi posé des gestes aujourd'hui considérés comme étant contraires à l'éthique?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Évaluer la responsabilité de personnages historiques face à un événement important. Évaluer quel degré de responsabilité doit être attribué à différentes personnes et déterminer si leurs actions étaient bien fondées dans un contexte historique donné
      • Étudier diverses sources médiatiques sur un enjeu et évaluer jusqu'à quel point le langage contient des jugements moraux implicites ou explicites
content_fr: 
  • Définitions de la culture et comment celles-ci ont évolué au fil du temps
  • Éléments de culture et expressions culturelles
  • Conflit et résolution de conflit au sein des cultures et entre celles-ci
  • Systèmes de pouvoir, d'autorité et de gouvernance
  • Rôle des systèmes de valeurs et des systèmes de croyances dans l'évolution des cultures
  • Interactions et échanges entre cultures
  • interactions entre cultures et milieu naturel
content elaborations fr: 
  • Définitions de la culture et comment celles-ci ont évolué au fil du temps :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • termes tels que « civilisé » et « non civilisé »
      • différents points de vue pour définir la culture
  • Éléments de culture et expressions culturelles :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • langue
      • formes principales d'expression artistique
      • utilisation de symboles et d'images
      • archétypes culturels
      • matériaux et techniques utilisés par différentes cultures
  • Conflit et résolution de conflit au sein des cultures et entre celles-ci :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • conquêtes territoriales et traitement des peuples conquis
      • alliances militaires et diplomatie
      • conflits à propos de valeurs ou d'idées
      • conflits à propos de ressources et de richesses
  • Systèmes de pouvoir, d'autorité et de gouvernance :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • rôles de chefs de file (leadership) au sein des cultures
      • leadership formel et informel
      • autorité institutionnelle
      • processus pour établir et faire respecter des lois
  • Rôle des systèmes de valeurs et des systèmes de croyances dans l'évolution des cultures :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • doctrines religieuses
      • valeurs et morales
      • croyances philosophiques
      • mythes, légendes et héros
  • Interactions et échanges entre cultures :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • échange d'idées et transmission de la culture
      • diffusion des technologies
      • dissémination des religions et des philosophies
      • commerce terrestre et maritime entre cultures
  • Interactions entre cultures et milieu naturel :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • climat, flore et faune indigènes
      • ressources naturelles et développement économique
      • adaptation de l'homme au milieu physique :
        • utilisation des courants océaniques par les peuples de la Polynésie pour s'orienter
        • chasse saisonnière chez les Cris
        • pisciculture en Colombie-Britannique
        • enjeux du transport dans le développement urbain local
      • degrés de séparation entre milieu physique et milieu culturel :
        • relation à l'eau chez le peuple San
        • approvisionnement communautaire en eau chez les peuples autochtones du Canada
        • protection des cours d'eau dans le centre et le nord de la Colombie-Britannique
        • vie urbaine locale et utilisation d'eau en bouteille
      • interdépendance de l'identité culturelle et du milieu physique :
        • identité de groupe chez les Yanomami et pratiques de la chasse en Amazonie
        • pêche et identité chez les Terre-Neuviens
PDF Only: 
Yes
Curriculum Status: 
2019/20
Has French Translation: 
Yes