Curriculum English Language Arts Grade 2

Subject: 
English Language Arts
Grade: 
Grade 2
Big Ideas: 
Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy.
Stories and other texts connect us to ourselves, our families, and our communities.
Everyone has a unique story to share.
Through listening and speaking, we connect with others and share our world.
Playing with language helps us discover how language works.
Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • story: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • stories: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • text: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • texts: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
Curricular Competencies: 
Comprehend and connect (reading, listening, viewing)
  • Read fluently at grade level
  • Use sources of information and prior knowledge to make meaning
  • Use developmentally appropriate reading, listening, and viewing strategies to make meaning
  • Recognize how different text structures reflect different purposes.
  • Engage actively as listeners, viewers, and readers, as appropriate, to develop understanding of self, identity, and community
  • Demonstrate awareness of the role that story plays in personal, family, and community identity
  • Use personal experience and knowledge to connect to stories and other texts to make meaning
  • Recognize the structure and elements of story
  • Show awareness of how story in First Peoples cultures connects people to family and community
Create and communicate (writing, speaking, representing)
  • Exchange ideas and perspectives to build shared understanding
  • Create stories and other texts to deepen awareness of self, family, and community
  • Plan and create a variety of communication forms for different purposes and audiences
  • Communicate using sentences and most conventions of Canadian spelling, grammar, and punctuation
  • Explore oral storytelling processes
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • text: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • texts: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • read fluently at grade level: reading with comprehension, phrasing, and attention to punctuation
  • prior knowledge: personal stories and experiences
  • reading, listening, and viewing strategies: examples include making predictions, making connections, making simple inferences, asking questions, engaging in conversation with peers and adults, showing respect for the contribution of others
  • text structures: examples include letters, recipes, maps, lists, web pages
  • engage actively as listeners, viewers, and readers: being open-minded to differences; connecting to personal knowledge, experiences, and traditions; participating in community and cultural traditions and practices; asking meaningful questions; using active listening; and asking and answering what if, how, and why questions in narrative and non-fiction text
  • story: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • stories: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • story in First Peoples cultures: Traditional and contemporary First Peoples stories take many forms (e.g., prose, song, dance, poetry, theatre, carvings, pictures) and are told for several purposes:
    • teaching (e.g., life lessons, community responsibilities, rites of passage)
    • sharing creation stories
    • recording personal, family, and community histories
    • “mapping” the geography and resources of an area
    • ensuring cultural continuity (e.g., knowledge of ancestors, language)
    • healing
    • entertainment
    • (from In Our Own Words: Bringing Authentic First Peoples Content to the K–3 Classroom, FNESC/FNSA, 2012)
  • exchange ideas and perspectives: taking turns in offering ideas related to the topic at hand, engaging in conversation with peers and adults, and showing respect for the contributions of others
  • communication forms: examples include personal writing, letters, poems, multiple-page stories, simple expository text that is non-fiction and interest-based, digital presentations, oral presentations, visuals, dramatic forms used to communicate ideas and information
  • oral storytelling processes: creating an original story or finding an existing story (with permission), sharing the story from memory with others, using vocal expression to clarify the meaning of the text
Concepts and Content: 
  • Story/text
    • elements of story
    • literary elements and devices
    • text features
    • vocabulary associated with texts
  • Strategies and processes
    • reading strategies
    • oral language strategies
    • metacognitive strategies
    • writing processes
  • Language features, structures, and conventions
    • features of oral language
    • word patterns, word families
    • letter formation
    • sentence structure
    • conventions
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • elements of story: character, plot, setting, structure (beginning, middle, end), and dialogue
  • literary elements and devices: language, poetic language, figurative language, sound play, images, colour, symbols
  • text features: how text and visuals are displayed (e.g., colour, arrangement, and formatting features such as bold, underline)
  • vocabulary associated with texts: book, page, chapter, author, title, illustrator, web page, website, search box, headings, table of contents, pictures, and diagrams
  • reading strategies: using illustrations and prior knowledge to predict meaning; rereading; retelling in own words; locating the main idea and details; using knowledge of language patterns and phonics to decode words; identifying familiar and “sight” words; monitoring (asking: Does it look right? Sound right? Make sense?); self-correcting errors consistently using three cueing systems: meaning, structure, and visual
  • oral language strategies: asking questions to clarify, expressing opinions, speaking with expression, taking turns, and connecting with audience
  • metacognitive strategies: talking and thinking about learning (e.g., through reflecting, questioning, goal setting, self-evaluating) to develop awareness of self as a reader and as a writer
  • writing processes: may include revising, editing, considering audience
  • features of oral language: including tone, volume, inflection, pace, gestures
  • letter formation: legible printing with spacing between words
  • sentence structure: the structure of compound sentences
  • conventions: common practices in punctuation (e.g., the use of a period or question mark at end of sentence) and in capitalization (e.g., capitalizing the first letter of the first word at the start of a sentence, people’s names, and the pronoun I)
Big Ideas FR: 
La langue et les histoires peuvent procurer du plaisir et stimuler la créativité.
Les histoires et les autres textes nous permettent d’entrer en relation avec nous-mêmes, notre famille et notre communauté.
Chacun a une histoire unique à faire connaître.
En écoutant et en parlant, nous entrons en relation avec les autres et nous leur faisons connaître notre monde.
Jouer avec la langue nous aide à découvrir son fonctionnement.
La curiosité et l’émerveillement nous font faire des découvertes sur nous-mêmes et sur le monde qui nous entoure.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • Histoire : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • histoires : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • textes : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • Texte : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
competencies_fr: 
Comprendre et faire des liens (lire, écouter, visionner)
  • Lire avec aisance pour son niveau
  • Utiliser des sources d’information et ses connaissances antérieures pour construire le sens
  • Adopter des stratégies de lecture, d’écoute et de visionnement adaptées à son âge pour construire le sens
  • Reconnaître comment des structures de texte différentes ont des objectifs différents
  • Écouter, visionner et lire activement, selon le cas, pour développer une compréhension de soi-même, de son identité et de sa communauté
  • Démontrer une sensibilisation au rôle que jouent les histoires dans la construction de l’identité personnelle, familiale et communautaire
  • Utiliser ses expériences et ses connaissances personnelles pour faire des liens avec les histoires et d’autres textes et construire le sens
  • Reconnaître la structure et les éléments de l’histoire
  • Démontrer une prise de conscience des liens que créent les histoires des cultures autochtones entre les personnes et leur famille, et leur communauté
 Créer et communiquer (écrire, parler, représenter)
  • Échanger des idées et des perspectives pour construire une compréhension partagée
  • Créer des histoires et d’autres textes pour approfondir la conscience de soi, de sa famille et de sa communauté
  • Planifier et créer une variété de formes de communication pour atteindre des objectifs et des publics variés
  • Communiquer au moyen de phrases respectant la majorité des conventions de l’orthographe, de la grammaire et de la ponctuation de l’anglais du Canada
  • Explorer les procédés de narration orale
 
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • textes : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle ou numérique :
    • o les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • o les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • o les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • o les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • o les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • Texte : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle ou numérique :
    • o les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • o les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • o les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • o les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • o les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • Lire avec aisance pour son niveau : lire en comprenant, former des phrases et porter attention à la ponctuation
  • Connaissances antérieures : histoires et expériences personnelles
  • Stratégies de lecture, d’écoute et de visionnement : par exemple, faire des prédictions, faire des liens, faire des inférences simples, poser des questions, converser avec des pairs et des adultes et démontrer du respect envers la contribution des autres
  • Structures de texte : par exemple, lettres, recettes, cartes, listes et pages Web
  • Écouter, visionner et lire activement : par exemple, être ouvert aux différences; faire des liens avec ses propres connaissances, expériences et traditions; participer aux traditions et pratiques communautaires et culturelles; poser des questions pertinentes; écouter activement; poser les questions et si? comment? et pourquoi? sur des récits et des textes non fictifs, et y répondre
  • Histoire : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • histoires : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • Histoires des cultures autochtones : les histoires traditionnelles et contemporaines des peuples autochtones prennent plusieurs formes (p. ex. prose, chant, danse, poésie, théâtre, sculpture, image) et sont racontées à différentes fins :
    • enseigner (p. ex. leçons de vie, responsabilités envers la communauté, rites de passage)
    • raconter des histoires sur la création du monde
    • consigner les histoires personnelles, familiales et communautaires
    • représenter la géographie et les ressources d’un secteur sur une carte
    • assurer une continuité culturelle (p. ex. perpétuer les connaissances des ancêtres, la langue)
    • guérir
    • divertir
      (Référence : In Our Own Words: Bringing Authentic First Peoples Content to the K–3 Classroom, FNESC/FNSA, 2012) [Traduction libre]
  • Échanger des idées et des perspectives : par exemple, exprimer des idées sur le sujet abordé en respectant le tour de parole, converser avec des pairs et des adultes et démontrer du respect envers la contribution des autres
  • Formes de communication : par exemple, écrits personnels, lettres, poèmes, histoires de plusieurs pages, textes informatifs simples non fictifs et en lien avec les intérêts de l’élève, présentations numériques, présentations orales, œuvres visuelles, œuvres dramatiques, utilisés pour communiquer des idées et de l’information
  • Procédés de narration orale : créer une histoire originale ou trouver une histoire qui existe déjà (obtenir la permission de l’utiliser), raconter l’histoire à d’autres de mémoire, utiliser l’expression vocale pour clarifier le sens du texte
content_fr: 
  • histoires et textes
    • les éléments de l’histoire
    • les éléments et procédés littéraires
    • les caractéristiques des textes
    • le vocabulaire associé aux textes
  • stratégies et procédés
    • les stratégies de lecture
    • les stratégies de communication orale
    • les stratégies métacognitives
    • les procédés d’écriture
  • caractéristiques, structures et conventions linguistiques
    • les caractéristiques de la langue orale
    • les structures, les familles de mots
    • la formation des lettres
    • la structure de la phrase
    • les conventions
content elaborations fr: 
  • Éléments de l’histoire : personnages, intrigue, contexte, structure (début, milieu, fin) et dialogues
  • Éléments et procédés littéraires : langage, langage poétique, langage figuré, jouer avec les sons, les images, les couleurs, les symboles
  • Caractéristiques des textes : présentation du texte et des éléments visuels (p. ex. couleur, organisation et caractéristiques de mise en page, comme le gras et le soulignement)
  • Vocabulaire associé aux textes : livre, page, chapitre, auteur, titre, illustrateur, page Web, site Web, champ de recherche, en-tête, table des matières, images et diagrammes
  • Stratégies de lecture : utiliser les illustrations et ses connaissances antérieures pour prédire le sens; relire; relater dans ses propres mots; distinguer l’idée principale et les détails; utiliser ses connaissances de la phonétique et des structures linguistiques pour décoder des mots; reconnaître les mots familiers et le vocabulaire visuel; vérifier (si le texte est bien écrit, a une bonne sonorité, a du sens); autocorriger systématiquement ses erreurs en se fiant aux 3 indices du sens, de la structure et de la graphie
  • Stratégies de communication orale : poser des questions pour clarifier; exprimer des opinions; parler avec expressivité; respecter le tour de parole et rejoindre le public
  • Stratégies métacognitives : réfléchir à ses apprentissages et en discuter (p. ex. réflexion, questionnement, établissement d’objectifs, autoévaluation) pour développer une conscience de soi en tant que lecteur et scripteur
  • Procédés d’écriture : par exemple, réviser, éditer, tenir compte du public cible
  • Caractéristiques de la langue orale : par exemple, le ton, le volume, les inflexions, le rythme, les gestes
  • Formation des lettres : former des lettres lisibles et espacer les mots
  • Structure de la phrase : structure de la phrase complexe
  • Conventions : pratiques courantes en matière de ponctuation (p. ex. utilisation du point ou du point d’interrogation en fin de phrase) et en matière de majuscules (p. ex. mettre en majuscule la première lettre du premier mot d’une phrase, la première lettre du nom d’une personne et le pronom I)
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes