Curriculum English Language Arts Grade 5

Subject: 
English Language Arts
Grade: 
Grade 5
Big Ideas: 
Language and text can be a source of creativity and joy.
Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
Texts can be understood from different perspectives.
Using language in creative and playful ways helps
us understand how language works.
Questioning what we hear, read, and view contributes to our ability to be educated and engaged citizens.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • story: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • stories: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • text: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • texts: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
Curricular Competencies: 
Comprehend and connect (reading, listening, viewing)
  • Access information and ideas from a variety of sources and from prior knowledge to build understanding
  • Use a variety of comprehension strategies before, during, and after reading, listening, or viewing to guide inquiry and deepen understanding of text
  • Synthesize ideas from a variety of sources to build understanding
  • Consider different purposes, audiences, and perspectives in exploring texts
  • Apply a variety of thinking skills to gain meaning from texts
  • Identify how differences in context, perspectives, and voice influence meaning in texts
  • Explain the role of language in personal, social, and cultural identity
  • Use personal experience and knowledge to connect to text and develop understanding of self, community, and world
  • Respond to text in personal and creative ways
  • Recognize how literary elements, techniques, and devices enhance meaning in texts
  • Show an increasing understanding of the role of organization in meaning
  • Demonstrate awareness of the oral tradition in First Peoples cultures and the purposes of First Peoples texts
  • Identify how story in First Peoples cultures connects people to land
Create and communicate (writing, speaking, representing)
  • Exchange ideas and perspectives to build shared understanding
  • Use writing and design processes to plan, develop, and create texts for a variety of purposes and audiences
  • Use language in creative and playful ways to develop style
  • Communicate in writing using paragraphs and applying conventions of Canadian spelling, grammar, and punctuation
  • Develop and apply expanding word knowledge
  • Use oral storytelling processes
  • Transform ideas and information to create original texts
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • text: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • texts: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • prior knowledge: personal stories and experiences
  • comprehension strategies: may include activating prior knowledge, making predictions, setting a purpose, making connections, asking questions, previewing written text, making inferences, drawing conclusions, using context clues.
  • thinking skills: may include exploring new ideas; determining the relative importance of ideas and information; considering alternative viewpoints; developing explanations; making and explaining connections; summarizing, analyzing, and synthesizing
  • respond to text in personal and creative ways: beginning to question the author’s viewpoint and intent; stating opinions with supporting reasons and explanations; using a variety of methods to respond (e.g., in writing, orally, and through drama)
  • recognize how literary elements, techniques, and devices enhance meaning: explaining how literary devices contribute to meaning (e.g., sound devices, figurative language)
  • organization: in texts, the use of paragraphing, chronological order, and order of importance
  • oral tradition in First Peoples cultures: the means by which culture is transmitted over generations other than through written records
    • Among First Peoples, oral tradition may consist of told stories, songs, and other types of distilled wisdom or information, often complemented by dance or various forms of visual representation, such as carvings or masks.
    • In addition to expressing spiritual and emotional truth (e.g., by symbol and metaphor), it provides a record of literal truth (e.g., about events and situations).
    • The oral tradition was once integrated into every facet of life of First Peoples and was the basis of the education system.
  • purposes of First Peoples: including to teach life lessons and skills, to convey individual and community responsibilities, to share family and community histories, to explain the natural world, to record history, to map the geography of an area
  • how story in First Peoples cultures connects people to land: First Peoples stories were created to explain the landscape, the seasons, and local events.
  • exchange ideas and perspectives: identifying opinions and viewpoints, asking clarifying questions, collaborating in large- and small-group activities, building on others’ ideas, disagreeing respectfully
  • use writing and design processes: planning, drafting, and editing compositions in a range of forms (e.g., opinion pieces, poetry, short stories, narrative, slams, spoken word, story boards and comic strips, masks, multimedia and multimodal forms)
  • creative and playful ways: may include taking risks in trying out new word choices and formats; playing with words, structures, and ideas
  • communicate in writing: using legible handwriting or a keyboard to convey texts
  • word knowledge: morphology, including roots, affixes, and suffixes
  • oral storytelling processes: creating an original story or finding an existing story (with permission), sharing the story from memory with others, using vocal expression to clarify the meaning of the text, using non-verbal communication expressively to clarify the meaning, attending to stage presence, differentiating the storyteller’s natural voice from the characters’ voices, presenting the story efficiently, keeping the listener’s interest throughout
Concepts and Content: 
  • Story/text
    • forms, functions, and genres of text
    • text features
    • literary elements
    • literary devices
    • perspective/point of view
  • Strategies and processes
    • reading strategies
    • oral language strategies
    • metacognitive strategies
    • writing processes
  • Language features, structures, and conventions
    • features of oral language
    • paragraphing
    • sentence structure and grammar
    • conventions
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • forms: such as narrative, exposition, report
  • functions: purposes of text
  • genres: literary or thematic categories such as fantasy, humour, adventure, biography
  • text: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • texts: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • text features: how text and visuals are displayed
  • literary elements: narrative structures and characterization
  • literary devices: sensory detail (e.g., imagery) and figurative language (e.g., metaphor, simile)
  • reading strategies: using contextual clues; using phonics and word structure; visualizing; questioning; predicting; previewing text; summarizing; making inferences
  • oral language strategies: focusing on the speaker, asking questions to clarify, listening for specifics, expressing opinions, speaking with expression, staying on topic, taking turns
  • metacognitive strategies: talking and thinking about learning (e.g., through reflecting, questioning, goal setting, self-evaluating) to develop awareness of self as a reader and as a writer
  • writing processes: may include revising, editing, considering audience
  • features of oral language: including tone, volume, inflection, pace, gestures
  • paragraphing: development of paragraphs that have a topic sentence and supporting details
  • grammar: parts of speech; past, present, and future tenses; subject-verb agreement
  • conventions: common practices in punctuation (e.g., uses of the comma, quotation marks for dialogue, uses of the apostrophe in contractions); in capitalization in titles, headings, and subheadings; and in Canadian spelling
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
La langue et les textes peuvent procurer du plaisir et stimuler la créativité.
Explorer les histoires et d’autres textes nous aide à nous comprendre nous-mêmes et à entrer en relation avec les autres et le monde.
Les textes peuvent être compris selon différentes perspectives.
En utilisant la langue de manière créative et ludique, nous apprenons à comprendre son fonctionnement.
Le fait de questionner ce que nous entendons, lisons et voyons nous aide à devenir des citoyens instruits et engagés.
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • Histoire : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • histoires : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • Texte : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • textes : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
competencies_fr: 
Comprendre et faire des liens (lire, écouter, visionner)
  • Accéder à de l’information et à des idées provenant d’une variété de sources et de ses connaissances antérieures afin de construire une compréhension
  • Utiliser une variété de stratégies de compréhension avant, pendant et après la lecture, l’écoute ou le visionnement afin d’orienter la recherche et d’approfondir la compréhension du texte
  • Synthétiser des idées provenant d’une variété de sources afin de construire une compréhension
  • Prendre en compte différents objectifs, publics et perspectives lorsqu’il explore les textes
  • Mettre en pratique une variété de compétences de réflexion pour construire le sens à partir des textes
  • Reconnaître comment le contexte, les perspectives et la voix influencent le sens des textes
  • Expliquer le rôle de la langue dans la construction de l’identité personnelle, sociale et culturelle
  • Utiliser ses expériences et ses connaissances personnelles pour faire des liens avec les textes et développer une compréhension de soi, de sa communauté et du monde
  • Réagir aux textes de manière personnelle et créative
  • Reconnaître comment les éléments, les techniques et les procédés littéraires enrichissent le sens des textes
  • Démontrer une compréhension grandissante du rôle de l’organisation dans la construction du sens
  • Démontrer une sensibilisation à la tradition orale dans les cultures autochtones et aux intentions des textes des peuples autochtones
  • Reconnaître les liens que créent les histoires des cultures autochtones entre les personnes et la terre
Créer et communiquer (écrire, parler, représenter)
  • Échanger des idées et des perspectives pour construire une compréhension partagée
  • Utiliser des procédés d’écriture et de conception pour planifier, développer et créer des textes visant des objectifs et des publics variés
  • Utiliser la langue de manière créative et ludique afin de développer un style
  • Communiquer à l’écrit au moyen de paragraphes en respectant les conventions de l’orthographe, de la grammaire et de la ponctuation de l’anglais du Canada
  • Améliorer sa connaissance des mots et la mettre en pratique
  • Utiliser des procédés de narration orale
  • Transformer des idées et de l’information pour créer des textes originaux
     
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Texte : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle ou numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • textes : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle ou numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • Connaissances antérieures : histoires et expériences personnelles
  • Stratégies de compréhension : par exemple, activer ses connaissances antérieures, faire des prédictions, déterminer un but, faire des liens, poser des questions, faire une prélecture des textes écrits, faire des inférences, tirer des conclusions, utiliser les indices fournis par le contexte
  • Compétences de réflexion : explorer de nouvelles idées; déterminer l’importance relative des idées et de l’information; envisager d’autres points de vue; expliquer; faire des liens et les expliquer; résumer, analyser et synthétiser
  • Réagir aux textes de manière personnelle et créative : commencer à s’interroger sur le point de vue et l’intention de l’auteur; émettre des opinions, les expliquer et les justifier; réagir par diverses méthodes (p. ex. à l’écrit, à l’oral, par l’art dramatique)
  • Reconnaître comment les éléments, les techniques et les procédés littéraires enrichissent le sens des textes : expliquer comment les procédés littéraires (p. ex. sonorités, langage figuré) contribuent au sens
  • Organisation : dans les textes, recours aux paragraphes, à l’ordre chronologique et à l’ordre d’importance
  • Tradition orale dans les cultures autochtones : transmission de la culture d’une génération à l’autre autrement que par l’écrit
    • chez les peuples autochtones, la tradition orale transmet une sagesse et de l’information, notamment sous la forme de chants ou d’histoires souvent accompagnés de danses ou d’éléments visuels, comme des sculptures ou des masques
    • en plus d’exprimer des vérités spirituelles et émotionnelles (p. ex. par les symboles ou les métaphores), la tradition orale permet de consigner des vérités historiques (p. ex. sur des événements et des situations)
    • autrefois, la tradition orale était intégrée à toutes les facettes de la vie et était à la base du système d’éducation des peuples autochtones
  • Intentions des textes des peuples autochtones : par exemple, enseigner des leçons de vie et des habiletés, faire connaître les responsabilités individuelles et collectives, transmettre l’histoire des familles et des communautés, expliquer le monde naturel, consigner des faits historiques, représenter la géographie d’un secteur sur une carte
  • Liens que créent les histoires des cultures autochtones entre les personnes et la terre : les histoires des peuples autochtones ont été créées pour expliquer le paysage, les saisons et les événements locaux
  • Échanger des idées et des perspectives : reconnaître les opinions et les points de vue, poser des questions pour clarifier, collaborer lors d’activités en grands et en petits groupes, développer les idées des autres, exprimer respectueusement son désaccord
  • Utiliser des procédés d’écriture et de conception : faire la planification, l’ébauche et l’édition de diverses formes de textes (p. ex. article d’opinion, poème, nouvelle, récit, slam, poésie orale, scénarimage, bande dessinée, masque, textes multimédias et multimodaux)
  • de manière créative et ludique : par exemple, prendre des risques en employant des mots et des formats nouveaux; jouer avec les mots, les structures et les idées
  • Communiquer à l’écrit : écrire ses textes d’une écriture lisible ou à l’ordinateur
  • Connaissance des mots : morphologie, notamment les racines et les affixes
  • Procédés de narration orale : créer une histoire originale ou trouver une histoire qui existe déjà (obtenir la permission de l’utiliser), raconter l’histoire  à d’autres de mémoire, utiliser l’expression vocale pour clarifier le sens du texte, s’exprimer de manière non verbale pour clarifier le sens, avoir une présence scénique, faire la distinction entre la voix du narrateur et celles des personnages, présenter l’histoire de manière efficace, susciter l’intérêt de l’auditoire tout au long de l’histoire
content_fr: 
  • histoires et textes
    • les formes, fonctions et genres des textes
    • les caractéristiques des textes
    • les éléments littéraires
    • les procédés littéraires
    • les perspectives et points de vue
  • stratégies et procédés
    • les stratégies de lecture
    • les stratégies de communication orale
    • les stratégies métacognitives
    • les procédés d’écriture
  • caractéristiques, structures et conventions linguistiques
    • les caractéristiques de la langue orale
    • l’organisation des paragraphes
    • la structure des phrases et la grammaire
    • les conventions
content elaborations fr: 
  • Formes : par exemple, texte narratif, texte explicatif, rapport
  • Fonctions : buts escomptés du texte
  • Genres : catégories littéraires ou thématiques, comme la fantaisie, l’humour, l’aventure, la biographie
  • Texte : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • textes : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • Caractéristiques des textes : présentation du texte et des éléments visuels
  • Éléments littéraires : structures narratives et présentation des personnages
  • Procédés littéraires : perception sensorielle (p. ex. imagerie) et langage figuré (p. ex. métaphore, comparaison)
  • Stratégies de lecture : utiliser les indices fournis par le contexte; utiliser les sons et la structure des mots; visualiser; questionner; prédire; faire une prélecture; résumer; faire des inférences
  • Stratégies de communication orale : écouter attentivement la personne qui parle, poser des questions pour clarifier; être à l’écoute des détails, exprimer des opinions, parler avec expressivité, ne pas dévier du sujet, respecter le tour de parole
  • Stratégies métacognitives : réfléchir à ses apprentissages et en discuter (p. ex. réflexion, questionnement, établissement d’objectifs, autoévaluation) pour développer une conscience de soi en tant que lecteur et scripteur
  • Procédés d’écriture : par exemple, réviser, éditer, tenir compte du public cible
  • Caractéristiques de la langue orale : par exemple, le ton, le volume, les inflexions, le rythme, les gestes
  • Organisation des paragraphes : structurer les paragraphes autour d’une idée principale à laquelle on ajoute des détails complémentaires
  • Grammaire : catégories grammaticales; temps passé, présent et futur; accord sujet-verbe
  • Conventions : pratiques courantes en matière de ponctuation (p. ex. l’usage de la virgule dans les listes, des guillemets dans les dialogues, de l’apostrophe dans les contractions), de majuscules (mettre en majuscules les titres, les en-têtes et les sous-titres) et d’orthographe de l’anglais du Canada
 
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes