Curriculum Géologie 12e

Subject: 
Geology
Grade: 
Grade 12
Big Ideas: 
Minerals, rocks, and earth materials form in response to conditions within and on the Earth’s surface and are the foundation of many resource-based industries.
Earth’s geological and biological history is interpreted and inferred from information stored in rock strata and fossil evidence.
The plate tectonic theory explains the changes that occur within Earth and to Earth’s crust throughout geological time.
The form, arrangement, and structure of rocks are affected by three-dimensional forces over time.
Weathering and erosion processes continually reshape landscapes through the interaction of the geosphere with the hydrosphere and atmosphere.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • Minerals, rocks, and earth materials:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
    • What are the differences between various types of rocks, minerals, and earth materials?
    • How does the rock cycle change rocks and minerals?
    • What information can rock formations and mineral deposits provide on past environments and conditions?
  • Earth’s geological and biological history:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How do geoscientists establish the age of geological events and materials?
      • How do fossils contribute to an understanding of past geological conditions and environments?
      • How was the geologic time scale developed and what are its applications?
      • How does the fossil record suggest that Earth has experienced significant periods of change?
  • plate tectonic theory:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What evidence suggests that a supercontinent will form again?
      • What drives the motion of tectonic plates?
      • What evidence do scientists have to support the idea that Earth is composed of layers?
      • How can seismic data be used by scientists?
      • What is the significance of the global distribution of volcanoes, mountain ranges, and earthquake epicentres?
  • form, arrangement, and structure of rocks:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How are geologic maps and 3D block models used by different interest groups?
      • What types of information do geoscientists use to reconstruct past landscapes, environments, and geological conditions?
      • What factors contribute to the folding and faulting of strata?
      • What patterns exist in rock strata that identify various geological structures?
  • Weathering and erosion processes:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How have wind, water, ice, and mass movements shaped our landscape over time?
      • What are the causes and effects of Earth’s glaciation events?
      • How does First Peoples knowledge further our understanding of weathering and erosional processes?
      • What impacts do human activities have on local and global groundwater resources?
Curricular Competencies: 
Questioning and predicting
  • Questioning and predicting
  • Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal, local, or global interest
  • Make observations aimed at identifying their own questions, including increasingly abstract ones, about the natural world
  • Formulate multiple hypotheses and predict multiple outcomes
Planning and conducting
  • Planning and conducting
  • Collaboratively and individually plan, select, and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and lab experiments, to collect reliable data (qualitative and quantitative)
  • Assess risks and address ethical, cultural, and/or environmental issues associated with their proposed methods
  • Use appropriate SI units and appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to systematically and accurately collect and record data
  • Apply the concepts of accuracy and precision to experimental procedures and data:
    • significant figures
    • uncertainty
    • scientific notation
Processing and analyzing data and information
  • Processing and analyzing data and information
  • Experience and interpret the local environment
  • Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information
  • Seek and analyze patterns, trends, and connections in data, including describing relationships between variables, performing calculations, and identifying inconsistencies
  • Construct, analyze, and interpret graphs, models, and/or diagrams
  • Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence
  • Analyze cause-and-effect relationships
Evaluating
  • Evaluating
  • Evaluate their methods and experimental conditions, including identifying sources of error or uncertainty, confounding variables, and possible alternative explanations and conclusions
  • Describe specific ways to improve their investigation methods and the quality of their data
  • Evaluate the validity and limitations of a model or analogy in relation to the phenomenon modelled
  • Demonstrate an awareness of assumptions, question information given, and identify bias in their own work and in primary and secondary sources
  • Consider the changes in knowledge over time as tools and technologies have developed
  • Connect scientific explorations to careers in science
  • Exercise a healthy, informed skepticism and use scientific knowledge and findings to form their own investigations to evaluate claims in primary and secondary sources
  • Consider social, ethical, and environmental implications of the findings from their own and others’ investigations
  • Critically analyze the validity of information in primary and secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems
  • Assess risks in the context of personal safety and social responsibility
Applying and innovating
  • Applying and innovating
  • Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches
  • Co-operatively design projects with local and/or global connections and applications
  • Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry
  • Implement multiple strategies to solve problems in real-life, applied, and conceptual situations
  • Consider the role of scientists in innovation
Communicating
  • Communicating
  • Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon
  • Communicate scientific ideas and information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations
  • Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Questioning and predicting:
    • Sample opportunities to support student inquiry:
      • Predict the geologic history of an area, given the types of structures evident in maps or models.
      • What knowledge do First Peoples have of tectonic events in the local area?
      • Predict how the local landscape would change if a major faulting or folding event were to occur.
      • How could current use of groundwater affect future land uses?
  • Planning and conducting:
    • Sample opportunities to support student inquiry:
      • Classify minerals by observing and testing physical and chemical properties (e.g., colour, crystal form, cleavage, fracture, specific gravity, acid reaction, magnetism, hardness).
      • Create molds and casts of local plants and animal artifacts.
      • Collect data to establish where most earthquakes tend to occur.
      • Assess the risks associated with geological field work.
      • How is a geological compass used to record accurate and precise strike-and-dip data?
      • What evidence is needed to measure and determine slope stability?
      • Explore local coastlines, parks, watersheds, lakes, and other areas to collect evidence of weathering and erosion.
  • Processing and analyzing data and information:
    • Sample opportunities to support student inquiry:
      • Classify fossils based on their modes of formation, taxonomy, and environments.
      • Reconstruct and interpret past environments, applying the principles of absolute and relative dating and using stratigraphy diagrams.
      • Use multiple seismographs and triangulation to locate an earthquake’s epicentre on a map.
      • Create and interpret time-distance graphs for P and S waves.
      • Survey a local geologic structure and create a block diagram.
      • Model geologic events in your local area, using shared First Peoples knowledge and personal observations.
      • Apply information from index fossils to solve problems that require correlation among various rock units.
      • Show the interrelationships among a geologic map, a cross-section, and a block diagram for a specific feature (e.g., fold, fault, dome).
      • Differentiate erosional and depositional glacial features as observed through illustrations and photographs.
      • Analyze the properties of subsurface rock layers that are capable of storing water or fossil fuels.
  • Evaluating:
    • Sample opportunities to support student inquiry:
      • Debate the economic, environmental, and social impacts of oil and gas pipelines in B.C.
      • Consider the impacts of resource development on First Peoples communities and traditional territories.
      • Measure various properties of rocks, sediments, and minerals, and analyze error within data samples collected.
      • Analyze the evidence and approaches used to develop the various models explaining K-T boundary extinction (i.e., end of the dinosaurs).
      • How can the fossil record be used as a source of evidence to support models of evolution?
      • What are the limits of technology on absolute dating methods?
      • Evaluate the development of various models of Earth’s internal structure and composition as tools and technologies have developed.
      • Debate possible locations for landfills based on porosity and permeability of the surrounding rock layers and the implications for groundwater.
  • Applying and innovating:
    • Sample opportunities to support student inquiry:
      • Describe and evaluate the many ways in which technology and innovation have been applied in the discovery of new ore and fossil fuel deposits and in bringing these resources to markets.
      • Co-operatively design a display or exhibit to educate the community on the geologic history of the local area, including plants, animals, landforms, and environmental conditions.
      • Design and build structures that are resistant to surface wave ground shaking (e.g., sugar cubes or toothpicks and marshmallows on a shake table).
      • Produce a plate tectonic map of a fictional terrestrial planet, showing evidence to support the types of plate boundaries.
      • Create a model of a well in an aquifer with a working pump.
  • Communicating:
    • Sample opportunities to support student inquiry:
      • Create an illustrated guide to the Mohs scale of mineral hardness, using common substances found around the home.
      • Make an illustration or use digital media to model the processes of the rock cycle.
      • Create a diorama consisting of plants, animals, and landscapes that depicts a past geological era (e.g., Devonian, Carboniferous, Cambrian).
      • Create a timeline, using a variety of methods (e.g., paper and string, digital media), that relates the expanse of geologic time to the evolution of Earth and life from its formation to the present day.
      • How does tectonic setting affect the perspectives and experiences of a local community?
      • Create a cross-sectional model of B.C. that illustrates the interaction of tectonic plates through the subduction zone.
      • How does the geology of an area influence First Peoples sense of place?
      • Create a public service advertisement explaining the causes of mass wasting and how they can be mitigated.
  • place: Place is any environment, locality, or context with which people interact to learn, create memory, reflect on history, connect with culture, and establish identity. The connection between people and place is foundational to First Peoples perspectives.
Concepts and Content: 
  • classification of minerals
  • processes of rock formation:
    • igneous
    • sedimentary
    • metamorphic
  • B.C. resource deposits and others:
    • origin and formation
    • economic, environmental, and First Peoples considerations
  • the geologic time scale and major events in Earth’s history
  • the local and global fossil record:
    • evidence of evolution
    • methods of fossil formation
    • First Peoples perspectives
  • methods for relative and absolute dating of rocks, fossils, and geologic events
  • reconstruction of Earth’s past through correlation of fossil data and rock strata
  • the formation of volcanic and deformational features through plate movement
  • evidence that supports a layered model of Earth
  • earthquakes and analysis of seismic waves
  • First Peoples knowledge of geologic events
  • internal and external factors that affect the plasticity of rock strata
  • faulting and folding
  • geologic maps, cross-sections, and block diagrams
  • weathering and erosion processes
  • First Peoples knowledge of landforms over time
  • periods of glaciation
  • groundwater and aquifers
  • causes and controls of mass wasting
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • minerals: composition, properties, structure
  • igneous:
    • Bowen’s reaction series
    • relationships between texture and rate of crystallization in extrusive (volcanic) and intrusive (plutonic) igneous rocks (e.g., cooling rate, flow behaviour)
    • classification of igneous rocks according to texture (e.g., vesicular, glassy) and composition (e.g., felsic, intermediate, mafic)
    • properties of common igneous rocks (e.g., granite, andesite, tuff, rhyolite, basalt, obsidian, pumice, porphyry)
    • volcanic and intrusive features (e.g., lava, pyroclastic flow, batholiths, sills, dikes)
  • sedimentary:
    • clastic sediments and chemical (precipitate or biochemical) sediments, and the rocks they become
    • relationships between depositional environments and particle size, shape, sorting, fossils, and organic structures
    • properties of common sedimentary rocks (e.g., conglomerate, breccia, sandstone, chert, coal)
    • sedimentary features (e.g., stratification, cross bedding, ripple marks, graded bedding, varves)
    • sedimentary features that affect porosity and permeability
  • metamorphic:
    • relationships between the types and characteristics of metamorphic rocks and parent rock, temperature, pressure, and chemical conditions
    • properties of common metamorphic rocks (e.g., slate, phyllite, schist, gneiss, marble)
    • foliated and non-foliated rocks
    • contact versus regional metamorphism
    • metamorphic grade (e.g., with reference to coal)
  • resource deposits: resources in the local area:
    • hydrothermal and volcanogenic ore deposits
    • placer and surficial deposits
    • oil, liquid natural gas (LNG), coal, and other fossil fuels
  • economic, environmental, and First Peoples considerations:
    • role of geochemical or geophysical data in locating geological resources
    • factors used to determine economic feasibility of extracting a geologic resource (e.g., price, concentration, accessibility, size, environmental impacts)
    • uses of geologic resources in B.C.
    • current resource conflicts (e.g., pipelines, oil sands, open-pit mines)
  • major events in Earth’s history: for example, formation of oldest rocks, earliest recorded life, domination of invertebrates, first land plants, domination of reptiles, appearance of flowering plants, Rocky Mountain orogeny, mass extinctions
  • fossil record: for example, Foraminifera, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Echinodermata, Arthropoda (trilobites), Coelenterata (corals), Vertebrata, Graptolithina, Conodonta, algae, plants, reptiles
  • evidence of evolution: changes found in the fossil record over time as evidence for natural selection, adaptive radiation, and punctuated equilibrium
  • relative and absolute dating:
    • absolute dating using radioactive isotopes
    • principles of relative dating (e.g., superposition, unconformities, cross-cutting, index fossils, law of faunal succession)
  • volcanic and deformational features:
    • volcanic features (e.g., contact metamorphism, sills, dykes, volcano types, flow behaviours, extrusive materials, columnar jointing)
    • deformational features (e.g., folds, faults, mountains)
  • evidence: for example, seismic wave velocities and paths, shadow zones, state of material, density, composition
  • earthquakes:
    • origin (e.g., shallow, medium, deep focus, location of the epicentre)
    • properties (e.g., Richter or Mercalli scale, amount of energy released)
    • potential hazards (e.g., tsunamis, city infrastructures, liquefaction of soils)
  • internal and external factors: for example, temperature, pressure, chemical composition
  • faulting and folding: results of specific tectonic environments and forces:
    • faulting (e.g., normal, reverse, thrust, strike-slip)
    • folding (e.g., symmetrical, asymmetrical, plunging folds, domes, basin)
  • geologic maps, cross-sections, and block diagrams:
    • representation of surface and subsurface structures using past or present data
    • geologic mapping symbols (e.g., strike and dip)
    • symbols for different rock types and fossils
    • age of strata
    • methods of data collection (e.g., surveying, GIS)
  • weathering and erosion processes:
    • modifications of the Earth’s surface and production of characteristic features
    • mass movements (slide, soil creep)
    • chemical, physical, and biological weathering
    • weathering potential of minerals in Bowen’s reaction series (e.g., stability of quartz)
    • erosion by wind, water, gravity, and ice
    • erosion and deposition by rivers
  • periods of glaciation:
    • characteristic erosional and depositional features and landforms
    • causes and frequency
  • groundwater and aquifers:
    • quality and quantity
    • water table, zone of saturation
    • effect of porosity and permeability on aquifer characteristics
    • artesian wells and springs
    • use of groundwater (e.g., urbanization, agriculture, sea-water contamination of groundwater, over-pumping)
  • controls of mass wasting: for example, drainage, installation of perforated pipe
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les minéraux, les roches et les matériaux constitutifs de la Terre sont formés sous l’action des conditions particulières de l’intérieur et de la surface de la Terre; ces ressources sont à la base de plusieurs industries primaires.
L’histoire géologique et biologique de la Terre a été déduite et inférée à partir d’information ensevelie dans les strates rocheuses et de fossiles.
La théorie de la tectonique des plaques explique les changements qui se produisent à l’intérieur de la Terre et au niveau de la croûte terrestre, au fil des temps géologiques.
Au fil du temps, l’action tridimensionnelle des forces modifie la forme, l’arrangement et la structure des roches.
Les processus de météorisation et d’érosion transforment les paysages au fur et à mesure que la géosphère interagit avec l’hydrosphère et l’atmosphère. 
 
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • Les minéraux, les roches et les matériaux constitutifs de la Terre :
    • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion de l’élève :
      • Comment peut-on faire la distinction entre les différents types de roches, les minéraux et les matériaux constitutifs de la Terre?
      • De quelle manière le cycle lithologique transforme-t-il les roches et les minéraux?
      • Quels renseignements les formations rocheuses et les gisements de minerais nous fournissent-ils sur les environnements et les conditions passés?
  • histoire géologique et biologique de la Terre :
    • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion de l’élève :
      • De quelle façon les géoscientifiques déterminent-ils l’âge d’événements et de matériaux géologiques?
      • Comment les fossiles contribuent-ils à notre conception des conditions et des environnements géologiques passés?
      • Comment l’échelle des temps géologiques s’est-elle développée et quelles sont ses applications?
      • Quels éléments du registre fossile suggèrent que la Terre a connu d’importantes périodes de changements?
  • théorie de la tectonique des plaques :
    • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion de l’élève :
      • Quels facteurs géologiques nous laissent supposer que le supercontinent se reformera un jour?
      • Quels sont les mécanismes responsables du mouvement des plaques tectoniques?
      • Quels éléments de preuve appuient l’idée que la Terre est constituée de couches?
      • Comment les données sismiques peuvent-elles être utilisées par les scientifiques?
      • Quelles conclusions tirer de la répartition planétaire des volcans, des chaînes de montagnes et des épicentres sismiques?
  • la forme, l’arrangement et la structure des roches :
    • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion de l’élève :
      • À quelle fin les cartes géologiques et les modèles 3D sont-ils utilisés par différents groupes d’intérêts?
      • Sur quels types de données les géoscientifiques s’appuient-ils pour reconstituer les paysages, les environnements et les conditions géologiques passés?
      • Quels facteurs contribuent à la formation de failles et de plis dans les strates rocheuses?
      • Quelles régularités des strates rocheuses permettent d’identifier diverses structures géologiques?
  • processus de météorisation et d’érosion :
    • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion de l’élève :
      • Comment l’action du vent, de l’eau, des glaciers de même que les mouvements de terrain ont-ils façonné les paysages au fil du temps?
      • Quels sont les causes et les effets des épisodes glaciaires qui ont marqué l’histoire de la Terre?
      • Comment le savoir autochtone nous permet-il d’approfondir notre connaissance des processus de météorisation et d’érosion?
      • Quelles sont les répercussions, à l’échelle locale et mondiale, des activités humaines sur les réservoirs d’eaux souterraines?
competencies_fr: 
Poser des questions et faire des prédictions
  • Poser des questions et faire des prédictions
  • Faire preuve d’une curiosité intellectuelle soutenue sur un sujet scientifique ou un problème qui revêt un intérêt personnel, local ou mondial
  • Faire des observations dans le but de formuler ses propres questions, d’un niveau d’abstraction croissant, sur des phénomènes naturels
  • Formuler de multiples hypothèses et prédire de multiples résultats
Planifier et exécuter
  • Planifier et exécuter
  • Planifier, sélectionner et utiliser, en collaboration et individuellement, des méthodes de recherche appropriées, y compris des travaux sur le terrain et des expériences en laboratoire, afin de recueillir des données fiables (qualitatives et quantitatives)
  • Évaluer les risques et aborder les questions éthiques, culturelles et environnementales liées à ses propres méthodes
  • Utiliser les unités SI et l’équipement adéquats, y compris des technologies numériques, pour recueillir et consigner des données de façon systématique et précise
  • Appliquer les concepts d’exactitude et de précision aux procédures expérimentales et aux données :
    • chiffres significatifs
    • incertitude
    • notation scientifique
Traiter et analyser des données et de l’information
  • Traiter et analyser des données et de l’information
  • Découvrir son environnement immédiat et l’interpréter
  • Recourir aux perspectives et connaissances des peuples autochtones, aux autres modes d’acquisition des connaissances et aux connaissances locales comme sources d’information
  • Relever et analyser les régularités, les tendances et les rapprochements dans les données, notamment en décrivant les relations entre les variables, en effectuant des calculs et en relevant les incohérences
  • Tracer, analyser et interpréter des graphiques, des modèles et des diagrammes
  • Appliquer ses connaissances des concepts scientifiques pour tirer des conclusions correspondant aux éléments de preuve
  • Analyser des relations de cause à effet
Évaluer
  • Évaluer
  • Évaluer ses méthodes et conditions expérimentales, notamment en déterminant des sources d’erreur ou d’incertitude et des variables de confusion, et en examinant d’autres explications et conclusions
  • Décrire des moyens précis d’améliorer ses méthodes de recherche et la qualité de ses données
  • Évaluer la validité et les limites d’un modèle ou d’une analogie décrivant le phénomène étudié
  • Être au fait de la fragilité des hypothèses, remettre en question l’information fournie et déceler les idées reçues dans son propre travail ainsi que dans les sources primaires et secondaires
  • Tenir compte de l’évolution du savoir attribuable au développement des outils et des technologies
  • Établir des liens entre les explorations scientifiques et les possibilités de carrière en sciences
  • Faire preuve d’un scepticisme éclairé et appuyer la réalisation de ses propres recherches ainsi que l’évaluation des conclusions d’autres travaux de recherche sur les connaissances et les découvertes scientifiques
  • Réfléchir aux conséquences sociales, éthiques et environnementales des résultats de ses propres recherches et d’autres travaux de recherche
  • Procéder à une analyse critique de l’information provenant de sources primaires et secondaires et évaluer les approches employées pour la résolution des problèmes
  • Évaluer les risques du point de vue de la sécurité personnelle et de la responsabilité sociale
Appliquer et innover
  • Appliquer et innover
  • Contribuer au bien-être des membres de la communauté, à celui de la collectivité et de la planète, ainsi qu’à son propre bien-être, en faisant appel à des méthodes individuelles ou des approches axées sur la collaboration
  • Concevoir, en coopération, des projets ayant des liens et des applications à l’échelle locale ou mondiale
  • Contribuer, par la recherche, à trouver des solutions à des problèmes locaux ou mondiaux
  • Mettre en pratique de multiples stratégies afin de résoudre des problèmes dans un contexte de vie réelle, expérimental ou conceptuel
  • Réfléchir à l’apport des scientifiques en matière d’innovation
Communiquer
  • Communiquer
  • Élaborer des modèles concrets ou théoriques pour décrire un phénomène
  • Communiquer des idées et des renseignements scientifiques, et possiblement suggérer un plan d’action ayant un objectif et un auditoire précis, en développant des arguments fondés sur des faits et en employant des conventions, des représentations et un langage scientifique adéquat
  • Exprimer et approfondir une variété d’expériences, de perspectives et d’interprétations du monde par rapport au « lieu »
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Poser des questions et faire des prédictions :
    • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion de l’élève :
      • Prédire l’histoire géologique d’une région, à partir du type de structures figurant sur des cartes ou des modèles.
      • Quelles connaissances les peuples autochtones possèdent-ils des événements tectoniques ayant eu lieu dans la région?
      • Prédire comment se transformerait le paysage local si une déformation géologique majeure — formation d’une faille ou de plissements — venait à se produire.
      • Quels pourraient être les effets de l’utilisation actuelle des eaux souterraines sur l’utilisation future des terres?
  • Planifier et exécuter :
    • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion de l’élève :
      • Classer les minéraux en les observant et en analysant leurs propriétés physiques et chimiques (p. ex. couleur, forme des cristaux, clivage, fracture, densité relative, réaction à l’acide, magnétisme, dureté).
      • Créer des moules et des empreintes d’artéfacts végétaux ou d’animaux de la région.
      • Recueillir des données afin de déterminer quelles sont les zones plus propices aux tremblements de terre.
      • Évaluer les risques associés au travail géologique sur le terrain.
      • Comment une boussole de géologue permet-elle de consigner la direction et le pendage avec exactitude et précision?
      • Quelles données sont indispensables pour mesurer et déterminer la stabilité d’une pente?
      • Explorer les rivages, les parcs, les lignes de partage des eaux, les lacs et d’autres sites locaux, afin d’y recueillir des marques de météorisation et d’érosion.
  • Traiter et analyser des données et de l’information :
    • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion de l’élève :
      • Classer des fossiles en fonction de leur processus de fossilisation, taxon d’appartenance et milieu de provenance.
      • Mettre en pratique les méthodes de datation absolue et relative et s’appuyer sur des diagrammes stratigraphiques afin de reconstituer et d’interpréter des environnements passés.
      • Utiliser les signaux provenant de plusieurs sismographes et le principe de la triangulation pour positionner l’épicentre d’un séisme sur une carte.
      • Créer et interpréter des graphiques de temps de parcours en fonction de la distance d’ondes sismiques P et S.
      • Créer le bloc-diagramme d’une structure locale à partir de son levé géologique.
      • Modéliser des événements géologiques locaux, à partir des connaissances des peuples autochtones d’une part, et de vos propres observations d’autre part.
      • Utiliser l’information fournie par les fossiles stratigraphiques pour résoudre des problèmes qui nécessitent l’établissement de corrélations entre plusieurs unités lithologiques.
      • Dégager les corrélations entre la carte géologique, la coupe transversale et le bloc-diagramme d’une formation géologique spécifique (p. ex. pli, faille, dôme).
      • À partir d’illustrations et de photographies, différencier les reliefs glaciaires modelés par l’érosion de ceux qui résultent de l’accumulation de sédiments.
      • Analyser les propriétés des couches rocheuses de subsurface capables d’emmagasiner l’eau ou les combustibles fossiles.
  • Évaluer :
    • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion de l’élève :
      • Débattre des impacts économiques, environnementaux et sociaux associés aux pipelines pétroliers et gaziers en C.-B.
      • Réfléchir aux répercussions de l’exploitation des ressources naturelles sur les communautés et les territoires autochtones.
      • Mesurer plusieurs caractéristiques des roches, sédiments et minéraux et analyser les erreurs dans les données recueillies .
      • Analyser les éléments de preuve et les approches utilisées pour développer les différents modèles d’extinction de la crise du Crétacé-Tertiaire (ou K-T) (c.-à-d. extinction des dinosaures).
      • Dans quelle mesure le registre fossile constitue-t-il une source d’éléments de preuve favorable aux modèles évolutifs?
      • Quelles sont les limites des technologies utilisées dans le cadre des méthodes de datation absolue?
      • Évaluer l’évolution des différents modèles de la structure et de la composition internes de la Terre, au fur et à mesure du développement des outils et des technologies.
      • Débattre de la question des emplacements potentiels de décharges publiques en fonction de la porosité et de la perméabilité des couches rocheuses avoisinantes et des conséquences pour les eaux souterraines.
  • Appliquer et innover :
    • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion de l’élève :
      • Décrire et évaluer les façons dont les outils technologiques et les innovations ont permis la découverte de nouveaux gisements de minerai et de combustibles fossiles d’une part, et la commercialisation de ces ressources d’autre part.
      • En équipe, concevoir une affiche ou organiser une exposition, incluant notamment des plantes, des animaux, des paysages et des conditions environnementales, pour faire connaître l’histoire géologique locale à la collectivité.
      • Concevoir et construire des structures résistantes aux ondes de surface responsables des secousses (p. ex. cubes de sucre ou cure-dents et guimauves sur une table de vibration).
      • Tracer la carte des plaques tectoniques d’une planète tellurique fictive, sur laquelle figurent des formations qui justifient le type de frontières entre les plaques.
      • Créer le modèle d’un puits foré directement dans un aquifère et muni d’une pompe fonctionnelle.
  • Communiquer :
    • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion de l’élève :
      • Créer un guide illustré de l’échelle de Mohs — qui permet de déterminer la dureté relative des minéraux —, à partir de substances communément trouvées à la maison.
      • Modéliser le cycle lithologique en faisantune illustration, ou à l’aide de médias numériques.
      • Créer un diorama composé de plantes, d’animaux et de paysages représentant une ère géologique passée (p. ex. Dévonien, Carbonifère, Cambrien).
      • À l’aide de différents supports (p. ex. papier et fil, média numérique), créer une ligne du temps qui établit des liens entre l’échelle des temps géologiques et l’évolution de la Terre et de la vie, depuis sa formation jusqu’à aujourd’hui.
      • En quoi le cadre tectonique d’une région influence-t-il la perception du monde et les expériences des membres de la collectivité locale?
      • Créer le modèle d’une coupe transversale de la C.-B. qui montre l’interaction des plaques tectoniques dans la zone de subduction.
      • Comment la géologie d’une région influence-t-elle le sens du lieu des peuples autochtones qui l’occupent?
      • Créer un message d’intérêt public expliquant les causes des mouvements de terrain et comment en atténuer les conséquences.
  • « lieu » : Le lieu est tout environnement, localité ou contexte avec lesquels une personne interagit pour apprendre, se créer des souvenirs, réfléchir sur l’histoire, établir un contact avec la culture et forger son identité. Le lien entre l’individu et le lieu est un concept fondamental dans l’interprétation du monde des peuples autochtones.
content_fr: 
  • Classification des minéraux
  • Processus de formation des roches :
    • ignées
    • sédimentaires
    • métamorphiques
  • Gisements de ressources et autres gisements de la C.-B. :
    • origine et formation
    • facteurs relatifs à l’économie, à l’environnement et aux peuples autochtones
  • Échelle des temps géologiques et événements majeurs de l’histoire de la Terre
  • Registre fossile local et mondial :
    • les éléments de preuve du processus d’évolution
    • le processus de fossilisation
    • les perspectives des peuples autochtones
  • Méthodes de datation relative et absolue des roches, fossiles et événements géologiques
  • Reconstitution du passé de la Terre grâce à la mise en corrélation des données fossiles et des strates rocheuses
  • Formation des volcans et déformations de la lithosphère provoquées par le mouvement des plaques
  • Éléments de preuve en faveur du modèle des couches concentriques de la Terre
  • Séismes et analyse des ondes sismiques
  • Connaissances des peuples autochtones des événements géologiques
  • Facteurs internes et externes qui influent sur la plasticité des strates rocheuses
  • Formation de failles et de plis
  • Cartes géologiques, coupes transversales et blocs-diagrammes
  • Processus de météorisation et d’érosion
  • Connaissances des peuples autochtones des modifications du relief au fil du temps
  • Périodes glaciaires
  • Eaux souterraines et aquifères
  • Causes et prévention des mouvements de terrain
content elaborations fr: 
  • minéraux : composition, caractéristiques, structure
  • ignées :
    • suites réactionnelles de Bowen
    • relations entre la texture et la vitesse de cristallisation des roches ignées volcaniques (extrusives) et plutoniques (intrusives) (p. ex. vitesse de refroidissement, dynamique éruptive)
    • classification des roches ignées selon leur texture (p. ex. vésiculaire, vitreuse) et leur composition (p. ex. felsique, intermédiaire, mafique)
    • propriétés des roches ignées les plus courantes (p. ex. granite, andésite, tuf volcanique, rhyolite, basalte, obsidienne, pierre ponce, porphyre)
    • structures volcaniques et intrusives (p. ex. lave, coulée pyroclastique, batholites, filons-couches, dykes)
  • sédimentaires :
    • sédiments détritiques et chimiques (p. ex. précipités ou biochimiques) et les roches qui en résultent
    • relations entre les milieux de sédimentation et la taille, la forme et la distribution des particules, la présence de fossiles et les structures organiques
    • propriétés des roches sédimentaires les plus courantes (p. ex. conglomérat, brèche, grès, chert, charbon)
    • caractéristiques sédimentaires (p. ex. stratification, entrecroisée, rides d’oscillation, granoclassement, varves)
    • caractéristiques sédimentaires qui influent sur la porosité et la perméabilité
  • métamorphiques :
    • relations entre la nature et les caractéristiques des roches métamorphiques et la roche-mère, la température, la pression et les conditions chimiques
    • propriétés des roches métamorphiques les plus courantes (p. ex. ardoise, phyllite, schiste, gneiss, marbre)
    • roches foliées et non foliées
    • métamorphisme de contact et métamorphisme régional
    • degré de métamorphisme (p. ex. en ce qui a trait au charbon)
  • Gisements de ressources : ressources de la région :
    • gisements de minerais hydrothermaux et volcanogènes
    • placer et dépôts de surface
    • pétrole, gaz naturel liquéfié (GNL), charbon et autres combustibles fossiles
  • facteurs relatifs à l’économie, à l’environnement et aux peuples autochtones :
    • rôle des données géochimiques et géophysiques dans le repérage de ressources géologiques
    • facteurs qui permettent d’évaluer l’intérêt économique d’un gisement (p. ex. coût, concentration, accessibilité, taille, impacts environnementaux)
    • utilisation des ressources géologiques en C.-B.
    • conflits actuels entourant les ressources (p. ex. pipeline, sables bitumineux, mines à ciel ouvert)
  • événements majeurs de l’histoire de la Terre : p. ex. formation des roches les plus anciennes, premières formes de vie connues, prédominance des invertébrés, premières plantes terrestres, prédominance des reptiles, apparition des plantes à fleurs, orogénèse des montagnes Rocheuses, extinctions massives
  • Registre fossile : p.ex. foraminifères, mollusques, brachiopodes, échinodermes, arthropodes (trilobites), cœlentérés (coraux), vertébrés, graptolites, conodontes, algues, végétaux, reptiles
  • éléments de preuve du processus d’évolution : changements répertoriés au fil du temps dans le registre fossile comme autant de preuves de l’existence des processus de sélection naturelle, de radiation évolutive et d’équilibre intermittent
  • datation relative et absolue :
    • datation absolue à l’aide d’isotopes radioactifs
    • principes de la datation relative (p. ex. superposition, discordances, coupes transversales, fossiles stratigraphiques, identités paléontologiques)
  • volcans et déformations :
    • structures volcaniques (p. ex. métamorphisme de contact, filon-couche, dyke, types de volcans, modes d’écoulement, produits d’éruption, débit columnaire)
    • déformations (p. ex. plis, failles, montagnes)
  • Éléments de preuve : p. ex. vitesse et voies de propagation des ondes sismiques, zones superficielles, état des matériaux, densité, composition
  • Séismes :
    • origine (p. ex. superficiel, moyen, profond, localisation de l’épicentre)
    • propriétés (p. ex. échelle de Richter ou de Mercalli, quantité d’énergie libérée)
    • risques associés (p. ex. tsunamis, infrastructures urbaines, liquéfaction des sols)
  • Facteurs internes et externes : p. ex. température, pression, composition chimique
  • Formation de failles et de plis : produites par l’action de forces appliquées dans des environnements tectoniques spécifiques :
    • formation de failles (p. ex. normales, inversées, chevauchantes, décrochantes)
    • formation de plis (p. ex. symétriques, asymétriques, plongeants, dômes, bassins)
  • Cartes géologiques, coupes transversales et blocs-diagrammes :
    • représentation des structures de surface et de subsurface à partir de données actuelles et passées
    • symboles des cartes géologiques (p. ex. direction et pendage)
    • symboles des différents fossiles et roches
    • âge des strates
    • méthodes de collecte des données (p. ex. arpentage, SIG)
  • Processus de météorisation et d’érosion :
    • modifications de la surface de la Terre et formation de structures particulières
    • mouvements de terrain (glissement, fluage du sol)
    • météorisation chimique, physique et biologique
    • altérabilité des minéraux telle que définie dans les séries réactionnelles de Bowen (p. ex. stabilité du quartz)
    • érosion résultant de l’action du vent, de l’eau, de la gravité et de la glace
    • érosion et dépôt de sédiments par les rivières
  • Périodes glaciaires :
    • formations et reliefs caractéristiques résultant de l’érosion et des dépôts glaciaires
    • causes et fréquence
  • Eaux souterraines et aquifères :
    • qualité et quantité
    • nappe phréatique, zone de saturation
    • effets de la porosité et de la perméabilité du sol sur les aquifères
    • puits artésiens et sources
    • utilisation des eaux souterraines (p. ex. urbanisation, agriculture, contamination des eaux souterraines par l’eau de mer, surpompage)
  • prévention des mouvements de terrain : p. ex. drainage, installation de tuyaux perforés
PDF Only: 
Yes
Curriculum Status: 
2019/20
Has French Translation: 
Yes