Curriculum Social Studies Grade 5

Subject: 
Social Studies
Grade: 
Grade 5
Big Ideas: 
Canada’s policies and treatment of minority peoples have negative and positive legacies.
Natural resources continue to shape the economy and identity of different regions of Canada.
Immigration and multiculturalism continue to shape Canadian society and identity.
Canadian institutions and government reflect the challenge of our regional diversity.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to — ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Develop a plan of action to address a selected problem or issue
  • Construct arguments defending the significance of individuals/groups, places, events, and developments (significance)
  • Ask questions, corroborate inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and origins of a variety of sources, including mass media (evidence)
  • Sequence objects, images, and events, and recognize the positive and negative aspects of continuities and changes in the past and present (continuity and change)
  • Differentiate between intended and unintended consequences of events, decisions, and developments, and speculate about alternative outcomes (cause and consequence)
  • Take stakeholders’ perspectives on issues, developments, or events by making inferences about their beliefs, values, and motivations (perspective)
  • Make ethical judgments about events, decisions, or actions that consider the conditions of a particular time and place, and assess appropriate ways to respond (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to — ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • State a hypothesis about a selected problem or issue
      • Use inference, imagination, and pattern identification to clarify and define a problem or issue
      • Compare a range of points of view on an issue
      • Summarize information and viewpoints about a problem or issue
      • Use latitude, longitude, and intermediate directions to locate major geographic features in BC and Canada
      • Describe a selected place in Canada using both absolute and relative location
      • Use keys and legends to interpret maps (e.g., resources, economic activities, transportation routes, capital cities, population)
      • Recognize that different types of maps represent particular types of information (e.g., thematic maps show information such as resource distribution; topographic maps show elevation; political maps show provincial boundaries)
      • Create maps to represent aspects of a specific place (e.g., economic activity, landforms, and bodies of water), applying keys and legends
      • Create and interpret timelines and maps to show the development of political boundaries in Canada (e.g., each province’s entry into Confederation, creation of Nunavut)
      • Retell a story from an interview (e.g., residential school student, new Canadian, war veteran, Elder)
      • Apply established criteria to compare information sources (e.g., relevance, accuracy, authorship)
      • Apply a variety of strategies to record information gathered from sources
      • Create a bibliography of all sources used
      • Use an outline to organize information into a coherent format
      • Create a presentation using more than one form of representation (e.g., poster and oral report)
      • Select ways to clarify a specific problem or issue (e.g., discussion, debate, research, reflection)
      • Identify opportunities for civic participation at the school, community, provincial, and national levels
      • Individually, or in groups, implement a plan of action to address a problem or issue (e.g., fundraising campaign, clothing or food drive, letter writing to a politician, editorial in school or community newspaper, petition)
  • Develop a plan of action to address a selected problem or issue:
    • Individually, or in groups, design a plan of action to address a problem or issue (e.g., fundraising campaign, clothing or food drive, letter writing to a politician, editorial in school or community newspaper, petition).
  • Construct arguments defending the significance of individuals/groups, places, events, and developments:
    • Sample activities:
      • Identify and assess the significance of individuals who have contributed to the development of Canada’s identity in various areas (e.g., the arts, literature, science and medicine, government, military, exploration, law and order, public service)
      • Assess the roles of the fur trade, the Canadian Pacific Railway, and the gold rushes in the development of Canada
    • Key questions:
      • Which people contributed most to Canada becoming an independent country?
      • What is the most significant event in Canadian history?
  • Sequence objects, images, and events, and recognize the positive and negative aspects of continuities and changes in the past and present:
    • Sample activity:
      • Create an annotated timeline, map, or other graphic to illustrate selected events or periods in the development of Canada
    • Key question:
      • What are some key differences between being a pre-Confederation-Canada citizen and being a Canadian citizen today?
  • Take stakeholders’ perspectives on issues, developments, or events by making inferences about their beliefs, values, and motivations:
    • Sample activities:
      • Through role-play, simulations, or letters, present personal perspectives on the challenges faced by immigrants (e.g., climate, language, tolerance for their religion, employment)
      • Examine sources to determine the motivation for historical wrongs against East and South Asian immigrants.
  • Make ethical judgments about events, decisions, or actions that consider the conditions of a particular time and place, and assess appropriate ways to respond:
    • Sample topics:
      • historical wrongs against East and South Asian immigrants
      • Indian Act
      • residential school system
      • internment of Ukrainians during World War I
      • internment of Japanese-Canadians during World War II
      • turning away of Jewish refugees prior to World War II
      • Canada’s response to climate change
    • Key questions:
      • Based on the evidence at the time, was the internment of Japanese people in BC justified? Explain your answer.
      • What are the potential consequences of non-sustainable practices in resource use?
Concepts and Content: 
  • the development and evolution of Canadian identity over time
  • the changing nature of Canadian immigration over time
  • past discriminatory government policies and actions, such as the Head Tax, the Komagata Maru incident, residential schools, and internments
  • human rights and responses to discrimination in Canadian society
  • levels of government (First Peoples, federal, provincial, and municipal), their main functions, and sources of funding
  • participation and representation in Canada’s system of government
  • resources and economic development in different regions of Canada
  • First Peoples land ownership and use
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • the changing nature of Canadian immigration over time:
    • Sample topics:
      • Changing government policies about the origin of immigrants and the number allowed to come to Canada
      • immigration to BC, including East and South Asian immigration to BC
      • the contributions of immigrants to Canada’s development (e.g., Chinese railway workers, Sikh loggers, Eastern European farmers, British investors)
      • push and pull factors
      • settlement pattern
      • growth of cities, provinces, and territories as a result of immigration
    • Key questions:
      • Why did East and South Asians come to BC and Canada, and what challenges did they face?
      • How has Canada’s identity been shaped by the immigration of individuals from a wide range of ethnic and cultural backgrounds?
  • past discriminatory government policies and actions, such as the Head Tax, the Komagata Maru incident, residential schools, and internments:
    • Sample topics:
      • historical wrongs against East and South Asian immigrants
      • Indian Act
      • Head Tax on Chinese immigrants
      • numbered treaties with First Peoples
      • treatment of Doukhabours
      • 1884-85 famine
      • 1907 Anti-Asian Riots
      • Japanese and German internments
      • reduction or relocation of First Nations reserves
      • ethnic minorities denied the vote
    • Key questions:
      • What types of discrimination have immigrants to Canada faced? (e.g., cases of systemic discrimination by local, provincial, and federal levels of government)
      • How might Canadian society be different today if exclusionary policies toward immigrants from East and South Asia had not been developed during certain periods of history?
      • What effects did residential schools have on First Nations families and communities
  • human rights and responses to discrimination in Canadian society:
    • Sample topics:
      • Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
      • LGBTQ rights and same-sex marriage
      • gender equity
      • racism
      • religious freedoms
      • freedom of speech
      • language rights
      • protest movements
      • examples of individuals who have fought for change and spoke out against injustice
      • key provisions of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
      • the role of the Charter in establishing equality and fairness for all Canadians (e.g., addressing cases of discrimination)
  • levels of government (First Peoples, federal, provincial, and municipal), their main functions, and sources of funding:
    • Sample activities:
      • Distinguish between the different levels of government in Canada: municipal, provincial, territorial, federal
      • Summarize the responsibilities of government (e.g., providing and administering services, making laws, collecting and allocating taxes)
      • Through role-play, simulation, or case study, examine the election process (e.g., different political parties, voting)
    • Sample topics:
      • key roles within provincial, territorial, and federal governments in Canada (e.g., premier, prime minister, MLA, MP, speaker, lieutenant governor, governor general; cabinet, senate, government ministries)
      • elected and appointed provincial and federal government leaders in Canada (e.g., local MLA and MP, local First Nations leaders, premier of BC, the lieutenant governor of BC, prime minister, governor general)
    • Key question:
      • Which level of government has the most effect on your daily life?
  • participation and representation in Canada’s system of government:
    • Sample topics:
      • representative versus direct democracy
      • electoral boundaries
      • political parties
      • electoral process
      • alternative voting systems
      • First Peoples governance
  • resources and economic development in different regions of Canada:
    • Sample activities:
      • Use maps to describe the location of natural resources in Canada in relation to characteristics of physical geography (e.g., fish on the coasts, mineral resources in the Canadian Shield)
      • Identify significant natural resources in BC and Canada, including:
      • fish and marine resources
      • forests
      • minerals (e.g., diamonds, gold, asbestos, tin, copper)
      • energy resources (e.g., natural gas, petroleum, coal, hydro)
    • Key questions:
      • What natural resources are most important to the economy of your community?
      • How has technology affected the discovery, extraction, processing, and marketing of selected natural resources?
  • First Peoples land ownership and use:
    • Sample topics:
      • treaties
      • burial grounds
      • housing
      • hunting and fishing
      • land claims disputes
    • Key questions:
      • How do First Peoples balance economic development with traditional uses of the land?
      • How fair has BC’s treaty process been? Explain your answer.
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
L’attitude du Canada et ses politiques envers les peuples minoritaires ont eu des conséquences négatives et des conséquences positives.
Les ressources naturelles continuent de façonner l’économie et l’identité de différentes régions du Canada.
L’immigration et le multiculturalisme continuent de façonner la société canadienne et son identité.
Les gouvernements et les institutions du Canada reflètent le défi que représente notre diversité régionale.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions
  • Établir un plan d'action portant sur une problématique ou une question précise
  • Élaborer des arguments pour défendre l’importance d’une personne, d’un groupe, d’un lieu, d’un événement ou d’un développement (portée)
  • Poser des questions, corroborer des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et la provenance d’une variété de sources, y compris les médias de masse (preuves)
  • Ordonner des objets, des images ou des événements, et relever les aspects positifs et négatifs des continuités et des changements dans le passé et le présent (continuité et changement)
  • Distinguer les conséquences intentionnelles et non intentionnelles des événements, des décisions ou des développements, et spéculer sur d’autres conséquences possibles (causes et conséquences)
  • Adopter les points de vue des parties intéressées sur des enjeux, des développements ou des événements en faisant des déductions sur leurs croyances, valeurs et motivations (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions après avoir pris en considération les conditions propres à une époque et à un lieu, et évaluer des façons de réagir appropriées (jugement éthique)
  • Élaborer des arguments pour défendre l’importance d’une personne, d’un groupe, d’un lieu, d’un événement ou d’un développement (portée)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions:
    • Compétences clés :
      • synthétiser l’information et les points de vue sur un problème ou une question
      • localiser les principales caractéristiques géographiques de la Colombie-Britannique et du Canada au moyen de la latitude et de la longitude et des points cardinaux intermédiaires
      • interpréter une carte au moyen des échelles et des légendes (p. ex. ressources, activité économique, axes de transport, capitales, démographie)
      • créer une carte représentant certains aspects d’un lieu (p. ex. activité économique, relief, plans d’eau) avec une échelle et une légende
      • créer et interpréter un schéma chronologique et une carte représentant l’évolution des frontières politiques du Canada
      • appliquer diverses stratégies pour consigner l’information recueillie auprès de sources
      • faire une présentation en utilisant plus d’une forme de représentation (p. ex. affiche et présentation orale)
      • choisir un moyen de clarifier un problème ou une question (p. ex. discussion, débat, recherche, réflexion)
      • relever des occasions de participer à la vie civique à l’échelle de l’école, de la communauté, de la province ou du pays
  • Établir un plan d'action portant sur une problématique ou une question précise:
    • individuellement ou en groupe, concevoir un plan d’action pour aborder un problème ou une question (p. ex. campagne de financement, collecte de vêtements ou de denrées alimentaires, lettre à un politicien, lettre au journal de l’école ou de la communauté, pétition)
  • Ordonner des objets, des images ou des événements, et relever les aspects positifs et négatifs des continuités et des changements dans le passé et le présent (continuité et changement):
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • illustrer des événements ou des périodes de l’histoire du Canada sur un schéma chronologique, une carte ou une autre représentation graphique annotée
    • Question clé :
      • Quelles sont les principales différences entre être un citoyen du Canada d’avant la Confédération et être un citoyen du Canada d’aujourd’hui?
  • Adopter les points de vue des parties intéressées sur des enjeux, des développements ou des événements en faisant des déductions sur leurs croyances, valeurs et motivations (perspective):
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • par des jeux de rôle, par des simulations ou par écrit, présenter ses points de vue personnels sur les défis que doivent relever les immigrants (p. ex. climat, langue, tolérance de leur religion, emploi)
      • chercher dans des sources les motivations derrière les injustices historiques envers les immigrants de l’Asie de l’Est et du Sud.
  • Porter des jugements éthiques sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions après avoir pris en considération les conditions propres à une époque et à un lieu, et évaluer des façons de réagir appropriées (jugement éthique):
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les injustices historiques envers les immigrants de l’Asie de l’Est et du Sud
      • la Loi sur les Indiens
      • le système de pensionnats
      • l’internement des Ukrainiens durant la Première Guerre mondiale
      • l’internement des Japonais durant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale
      • le refoulement des réfugiés juifs avant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale
      • la politique du Canada en matière de changements climatiques
    • Questions clés :
      • Est-ce que les preuves dont on disposait à l’époque justifiaient l’internement des Japonais en Colombie-Britannique? Explique ta réponse.
      • Quelles sont les conséquences possibles de l’utilisation non durable des ressources?
  • Élaborer des arguments pour défendre l’importance d’une personne, d’un groupe, d’un lieu, d’un événement ou d’un développement (portée):
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • mesurer le rôle joué par des personnes qui ont contribué au développement de l’identité canadienne dans divers domaines (p. ex. arts, littérature, science, médecine, gouvernement, forces armées, exploration, ordre public, fonction publique)
      • mesurer la place du commerce de la fourrure, du chemin de fer Canadien Pacifique et des ruées vers l’or dans le développement du Canada
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles personnes ont le plus contribué à l’indépendance du Canada?
      • Quel est l’événement le plus important de l’histoire du Canada?
content_fr: 
  • La naissance et l'évolution de l'identité canadienne au cours du temps
  • La nature changeante de l’immigration au Canada au cours du temps
  • Les politiques et actions discriminatoires prises dans le passé par le gouvernement, par exemple la taxe d’entrée imposée aux immigrants chinois, l’incident du Komagata Maru, les pensionnats et les internements
  • Les droits de la personne et les réactions à la discrimination dans la société canadienne
  • Les paliers de gouvernement (peuples autochtones, fédéral, provincial et municipal), leurs principales fonctions et leurs sources de financement
  • La participation au régime politique du Canada et la représentation dans ce régime
  • Les ressources et le développement économique dans différentes régions du Canada
  • La propriété et l’utilisation des terres chez les peuples autochtones
content elaborations fr: 
  • La nature changeante de l’immigration au Canada au cours du temps:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les changements de politique du gouvernement quant à l’origine des personnes autorisées à immigrer au Canada et à leur nombre
      • l’immigration en Colombie-Britannique, y compris en provenance de l’Asie de l’Est et du Sud
      • les contributions des immigrants au développement du Canada (p. ex. ouvriers de chemin de fer chinois, bûcherons sikhs, fermiers est-européens, investisseurs britanniques)
      • les facteurs incitatifs et dissuasifs
      • le mode de peuplement
      • la croissance des villes, des provinces et des territoires attribuable à l’immigration
    • Questions clés :
      • Pour quelles raisons les immigrants de l’Asie de l’Est et du Sud sont-ils venus s’établir en Colombie-Britannique et au Canada, et quelles difficultés ont-ils dû surmonter?
      • Comment l’immigration de gens aux origines ethniques et culturelles très diversifiées a-t-elle façonné l’identité canadienne?
  • Les politiques et actions discriminatoires prises par le passé par le gouvernement, par exemple la taxe d’entrée imposée aux immigrants chinois, l’incident du Komagata Maru, les pensionnats et les internements:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les injustices historiques envers les immigrants de l’Asie de l’Est et du Sud
      • la Loi sur les Indiens
      • la taxe d’entrée imposée aux immigrants chinois
      • les traités numérotés avec les peuples autochtones
      • le traitement des Doukhobors
      • la famine de 1884-1885
      • les émeutes anti-asiatiques de 1907
      • l’internement des Japonais et des Allemands
      • la réduction ou le déplacement des réserves des peuples autochtones
      • le refus du droit de vote aux minorités ethniques
    • Questions clés :
      • À quels types de discrimination les immigrants du Canada ont-ils été confrontés? (p. ex. cas de discrimination systémique par un palier de gouvernement local, provincial ou fédéral)
      • En quoi la société canadienne d’aujourd’hui serait-elle différente si les politiques d’exclusion des immigrants de l’Asie de l’Est et du Sud n’avaient pas été en vigueur durant certaines périodes de l’histoire?
      • Quelles ont été les conséquences des pensionnats sur les familles et les communautés des peuples autochtones?
  • Les droits de la personne et les réactions à la discrimination dans la société canadienne:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés
      • les droits des LGBTQ et le mariage entre personnes de même sexe
      • l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes
      • le racisme
      • les libertés religieuses
      • la liberté d’expression
      • les droits linguistiques
      • les mouvements de protestation
      • exemples de personnes qui ont lutté pour le changement et qui se sont prononcées contre l’injustice
      • les principales dispositions de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés
      • le rôle de la Charte pour la défense de l’égalité et de l’équité pour tous les Canadiens (p. ex. examen des cas de discrimination)
  • Les paliers de gouvernement (peuples autochtones, fédéral, provincial et municipal), leurs principales fonctions et leurs sources de financement:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • faire la distinction entre les différents paliers de gouvernement qui existent au Canada : municipal, provincial, territorial et fédéral
      • faire un sommaire des responsabilités du gouvernement (p. ex. fournir et administrer des services, légiférer, collecter et affecter les impôts)
      • par un jeu de rôle, une simulation ou une étude de cas, examiner le processus électoral (p. ex. multipartisme, vote)
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les postes clés au sein des gouvernements des provinces, des territoires et du Canada (p. ex. premier ministre provincial, premier ministre fédéral, membre de l’Assemblée législative, député, président de l’Assemblée législative, lieutenant-gouverneur, gouverneur général; cabinet, sénat, ministères du gouvernement)
      • les dirigeants élus et nommés des gouvernements des provinces et du Canada (p. ex. membre de l’Assemblée législative ou député de la circonscription, chefs des peuples autochtones de la région, premier ministre de la Colombie-Britannique, lieutenant-gouverneur de la Colombie-Britannique, premier ministre du Canada, gouverneur général)
    • Question clé :
      • Quel palier de gouvernement a le plus d’influence sur ta vie quotidienne?
  • La participation au régime politique du Canada et la représentation dans ce régime:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • démocratie représentative et démocratie directe
      • limites des circonscriptions électorales
      • partis politiques
      • processus électoral
      • autres systèmes électoraux
      • gouvernance des peuples autochtones
  • Les ressources et le développement économique dans différentes régions du Canada:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • localiser sur une carte les ressources naturelles du Canada par rapport aux caractéristiques de la géographie physique (p. ex. poissons sur les côtes, ressources minérales dans le Bouclier canadien)
      • relever les principales ressources naturelles de la Colombie-Britannique et du Canada :
        • poissons et ressources marines
        • forêts
        • minéraux (p. ex. diamants, or, amiante, étain, cuivre)
        • ressources énergétiques (p. ex. gaz naturel, pétrole, charbon, hydroélectricité)
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles ressources naturelles sont les plus importantes pour l’économie de ta communauté?
      • Comment la technologie a-t-elle influé sur la découverte, l’extraction, le traitement et la commercialisation de telle ou telle ressource naturelle?
  • La propriété et l’utilisation des terres chez les peuples autochtones:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • traités
      • lieux de sépulture
      • habitation
      • chasse et pêche
      • différends sur les revendications territoriales
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment les peuples autochtones composent-ils avec le développement économique et les utilisations traditionnelles des terres?
      • Le processus de traités de la Colombie-Britannique a-t-il été juste? Explique ta réponse.
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes