Curriculum Social Studies Grade 6

Subject: 
Social Studies
Grade: 
Grade 6
Big Ideas: 
Economic self-interest can be a significant cause of conflict among peoples and governments.
Complex global problems require international cooperation to make difficult choices for the future.
Systems of government vary in their respect for human rights and freedoms.
Media sources can both positively and negatively affect our understanding of important events and issues.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to — ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Develop a plan of action to address a selected problem or issue
  • Construct arguments defending the significance of individuals/groups, places, events, or developments (significance)
  • Ask questions, corroborate inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and origins of a variety of sources, including mass media (evidence)
  • Sequence objects, images, or events, and recognize the positive and negative aspects of continuities and changes in the past and present (continuity and change)
  • Differentiate between short- and long-term causes, and intended and unintended consequences, of events, decisions, or developments (cause and consequence)
  • Take stakeholders’ perspectives on issues, developments, or events by making inferences about their beliefs, values, and motivations (perspective)
  • Make ethical judgments about events, decisions, or actions that consider the conditions of a particular time and place, and assess appropriate ways to respond (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to — ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • With teacher and peer support, select a relevant problem or issue for inquiry
      • Use comparing, classifying, inferring, imagining, verifying, identifying relationships, and summarizing to clarify and define a problem or issue
      • Draw conclusions about a problem or issue
      • Locate and map continents, oceans, and seas using simple grids, scales, and legends
      • Locate the prime meridian, equator, Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, Arctic Circle, and Antarctic Circle on a globe or map of the world
      • Recognize the relationship between time zones and lines of longitude
      • Compare how graphs, tables, aerial photos, and maps represent information
      • Represent the same information in two or more graphic forms (e.g., graphs, tables, thematic maps)
      • Clarify a topic for presentation
      • Collect and organize information on a topic of your choice (e.g., a selected country)
      • Draw conclusions from collected information
      • Plan, prepare, and deliver a presentation on a selected topic (e.g., a country of their choice)
      • Prepare a bibliography, using a consistent style to cite books, magazines, interviews, web sites, and other sources used
      • Select ways to clarify a specific problem or issue (e.g., discussion, debate, research)
      • Defend a position on a national or global issue
      • Collect and organize information to support a course of action
      • Identify opportunities for civic participation at the school, community, provincial, national, and global levels
      • Individually, or in groups, implement a plan of action to address a problem or issue (e.g., fundraising campaign, clothing or food drive, letter writing to a politician, editorial in the school or community newspaper, petition)
  • Develop a plan of action to address a selected problem or issue:
    • Collect and organize information to support a course of action.
    • Individually, or in groups, implement a plan of action to address a problem or issue (e.g., fundraising campaign, clothing or food drive, letter writing to a politician, editorial in the school or community newspaper, petition).
  • Ask questions, corroborate inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and origins of a variety of sources, including mass media:
    • Sample activities:
      • Compare a range of points of view on a problem or issue
      • Compare and contrast media coverage of a controversial issue (e.g., climate change, resource management)
      • With peer and teacher support, determine criteria for evaluating information sources for credibility and reliability (e.g., context, authentic voice, source, objectivity, evidence, authorship)
      • Apply criteria to evaluate selected sources for credibility and reliability
      • Distinguish between primary sources and secondary sources
  • Differentiate between short- and long-term causes, and intended and unintended consequences, of events, decisions, and developments:
    • Sample activities:
      • Explain the historical basis of selected contemporary issues
      • Give examples of how your actions may have consequences for others locally or globally (e.g., effect of consumer choices)
  • Take stakeholders’ perspectives on issues, developments, and events by making inferences about their beliefs, values, and motivations:
    • Sample activities:
      • Compare and assess two or more perspectives on a local or global problem or issue
      • Consider reasons for differing perspectives (e.g., personal experiences, beliefs and values)
      • Key questions:
      • How can the exercise of power and authority affect an individual’s rights?
      • Should individuals be willing give up some personal freedoms for the sake of collective well-being?
  • Make ethical judgments about events, decisions, and actions that consider the conditions of a particular time and place, and assess appropriate ways to respond:
    • Key questions:
      • What are the rights and responsibilities of a global citizen?
Concepts and Content: 
  • the urbanization and migration of people
  • global poverty and inequality issues, including class structure and gender
  • roles of individuals, governmental organizations, and NGOs, including groups representing indigenous peoples
  • different systems of government
  • economic policies and resource management, including effects on indigenous peoples
  • globalization and economic interdependence
  • international cooperation and responses to global issues
  • regional and international conflict
  • media technologies and coverage of current events
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • the urbanization and migration of people:
    • Sample topics:
      • land usage
      • access to water
      • pollution and waste management
      • population density
      • transit and transportation
    • Key questions:
      • Why do the majority of people in the world now live in urban centres?
      • What are the advantages and disadvantages of urbanization?
  • global poverty and inequality issues, including class structure and gender:
    • Sample topics:
      • treatment of minority populations in Canada and in other cultures and societies you have studied (e.g., segregation, assimilation, integration, and pluralism; multiculturalism policies; settlement patterns; residential schools, South African Apartheid, the Holocaust, internment of Japanese-Canadians, Head Tax on Chinese immigrants; caste and class systems)
      • caste system
      • unequal distribution of wealth
      • corruption
      • lack of judicial process
      • infant mortality
      • women’s rights
      • social justice
      • treatment of indigenous people
    • Key questions:
      • How does discrimination and prejudice in modern Canadian society compare with that during other periods in Canada’s past or in other societies (e.g., systemic discrimination, overt racism)?
  • roles of individuals, governmental organizations, and NGOs, including groups representing indigenous peoples:
    • Sample topics:
      • United Nations
      • International Criminal Court
      • World Trade Organization
      • international aid
      • activists
      • lobby groups
      • international aid groups (e.g., Medecins sans Frontieres [Doctors without Borders])
      • Private foundations (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation)
  • different systems of government:
    • Sample activity:
      • Compare characteristics of the federal government in Canada with those of one or more other countries, including:
      • roles and responsibilities of members of government (e.g., prime minister, president, governor, MP, senator)
      • components of government (House of Commons, House of Lords, senate, province, state, prefecture, canton)
      • government decision-making structures and forms of rule (e.g., monarchy, republic, dictatorship, parliamentary democracy)
      • electoral processes (e.g., political parties, voting, representation)
      • Sample topic:
      • indigenous governance
    • Key questions:
      • Who benefits from different forms of government and decision making?
      • How would decisions be different under a different form of government?
  • economic policies and resource management, including effects on indigenous peoples:
    • Sample topics:
      • deforestation
      • mining
      • oil and gas
      • fisheries
      • infrastructure development
      • relocation of communities
    • Key questions:
      • How should decisions about economic policy and resource management be made?
      • How should societies balance economic development with the protection of the environment?
  • globalization and economic interdependence:
    • Sample topics:
      • trade
      • imports and exports
      • G20 (Group of Twenty)
      • European Union
      • North American Free Trade Act (NAFTA)
      • currency
      • tariffs and taxation
      • trade imbalances
  • international cooperation and responses to global issues:
    • Sample topics:
      • environmental issues
      • human trafficking
      • child labour
      • epidemic/pandemic response
      • fisheries management
      • resource use and misuse
      • drug trafficking
      • food distribution and famine
  • regional and international conflict:
    • Sample topics:
      • war
      • genocide
      • child soldiers
      • boundary disputes
      • religious and ethnic violence
      • terrorism
  • media technologies and coverage of current events:
    • Sample topics:
      • ownership of media
      • propaganda
      • editorial bias
      • sensationalism
      • freedom of the press
      • social media uses and abuses
    • Key questions:
      • How does the media influence public perception of major events?
      • Are some media sources more trustworthy than others? Explain your answer.
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les intérêts économiques peuvent être une source de conflits importante entre les peuples et les gouvernements.
La coopération internationale est nécessaire pour s’attaquer aux problèmes complexes du monde et faire des choix difficiles en prévision de l’avenir.
Les régimes politiques n’offrent pas tous les mêmes droits et libertés.
Les médias peuvent influencer positivement ou négativement notre compréhension des enjeux et des événements importants.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions
  • Établir un plan d'action portant sur une problématique  ou une question précise
  • Élaborer des arguments pour défendre l’importance d’une personne, d’un groupe, d’un lieu, d’un événement ou d’un développement (portée)
  • Poser des questions, corroborer des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et la provenance d’une variété de sources, y compris les médias de masse (preuves)
  • Ordonner des objets, des images et des événements, et relever les aspects positifs et négatifs des continuités et des changements dans le passé et le présent (continuité et changement) 
  • Distinguer les causes à court et à long terme et les conséquences intentionnelles et non intentionnelles des événements, des décisions ou des développements (causes et conséquences)
  • Adopter les points de vue des parties intéressées sur des enjeux, des développements ou des événements en faisant des déductions sur leurs croyances, valeurs et motivations (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions après avoir pris en considération les conditions propres à une époque et à un lieu, et évaluer des façons de réagir appropriées (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions:
    • Compétences clés :
      • avec l’aide de l’enseignant et de pairs, choisir un problème ou une question à investiguer
      • faire appel à la comparaison, à la classification, à l’inférence, à l’imagination, à la vérification, à l’identification de relations et à la synthèse pour clarifier et définir un problème ou une question
      • localiser et cartographier les continents, les océans et les mers au moyen de grilles simples, d’échelles et de légendes
      • comparer la représentation de l’information dans des graphiques, des tableaux, des photos aériennes et des cartes
      • représenter la même information sous deux formes graphiques ou plus (p. ex. graphique, tableau, carte thématique)
      • préparer une bibliographie en utilisant un style de présentation cohérent pour citer les livres, les magazines, les entrevues, les sites Web et les autres sources de référence
      • choisir un moyen de clarifier un problème ou une question (p. ex. discussion, débat, recherche)
      • relever des occasions de participer à la vie civique à l’échelle de l’école, de la communauté, de la province, du pays ou du monde
  • Établir un plan d'action portant sur une problématique ou une question précise:
    • collecter et organiser de l'information pour soutenir un plan d'action
    • individuellement ou en groupe, mettre en œuvre un plan d’action pour aborder un problème ou une question (p. ex. campagne de financement, collecte de vêtements ou de denrées alimentaires, lettre à un politicien, lettre au journal de l’école ou de la communauté, pétition)
  • Poser des questions, corroborer des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et la provenance d’une variété de sources, y compris les médias de masse:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • comparer divers points de vue sur un problème ou une question
      • comparer et mettre en contraste la couverture médiatique d’une question controversée (p. ex. changements climatiques, gestion des ressources)
      • avec l’aide des pairs et de l’enseignant, définir des critères pour évaluer la crédibilité et la fiabilité de sources d’information (p. ex. contexte, authenticité, source, objectivité, preuves, auteur)
      • appliquer des critères pour évaluer la crédibilité de sources
      • faire la distinction entre une source primaire et une source secondaire
  • Distinguer les causes à court et à long terme et les conséquences intentionnelles et non intentionnelles des événements, des décisions ou des développements:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • retracer les origines historiques de certains enjeux contemporains
      • trouver des exemples de conséquences de ses propres actions sur les autres, à l’échelle locale et à l’échelle mondiale (p. ex. répercussions des choix de consommation)
  • Adopter les points de vue des parties intéressées sur des enjeux, des développements ou des événements en faisant des déductions sur leurs croyances, valeurs et motivations:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • comparer et évaluer divers points de vue sur un problème ou une question d’intérêt local ou mondial
      • trouver des raisons qui expliquent les divergences d’opinions (p. ex. expériences personnelles, croyances, valeurs)
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment l’exercice du pouvoir et l’autorité affectent-ils les droits d’un individu?
      • Les individus devraient-ils accepter d’abandonner certaines libertés individuelles pour le bien commun?
  • Porter des jugements éthiques sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions après avoir pris en considération les conditions propres à une époque et à un lieu, et évaluer des façons de réagir appropriées:
    • Question clé :
      • Quels sont les droits et les responsabilités d’un citoyen du monde?
content_fr: 
  • L’urbanisation et la migration des personnes
  • La pauvreté et les inégalités dans le monde, y compris les disparités entre les classes sociales et entre les hommes et les femmes
  • Le rôle joué par des individus et des organismes gouvernementaux et non gouvernementaux, y compris les groupes qui représentent les peuples autochtones
  • Les différents régimes politiques
  • Les politiques économiques et la gestion des ressources, y compris les conséquences sur les peuples autochtones
  • La mondialisation et l’interdépendance économique
  • La coopération internationale et les réactions aux enjeux mondiaux
  • Les conflits régionaux et internationaux
  • Les applications de la technologie dans le monde des médias et la couverture des événements d’actualité
content elaborations fr: 
  • L’urbanisation et la migration des personnes:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • l’utilisation des terres
      • l’accès à l’eau
      • la pollution et la gestion des déchets
      • la densité de la population
      • le transport individuel et les transports publics
    • Questions clés :
      • Pourquoi la majorité des humains vivent-ils dans des centres urbains aujourd’hui?
      • Quels sont les avantages et les inconvénients de l’urbanisation?
  • La pauvreté et les inégalités dans le monde, y compris les disparités entre les classes sociales et entre les hommes et les femmes:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • le traitement des minorités au Canada et dans d’autres cultures et sociétés (p. ex. ségrégation, assimilation, intégration et pluralisme; politiques de multiculturalisme; modes de peuplement; pensionnats, apartheid en Afrique du Sud, Shoah, internement des Canado-Japonais, taxe d’entrée pour les immigrants chinois; systèmes de castes et de classes)
      • le système des castes
      • la répartition inégale de la richesse
      • la corruption
      • l’absence de processus judiciaire
      • la mortalité infantile
      • les droits des femmes
      • la justice sociale
      • le traitement des peuples autochtones
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment la discrimination et les préjugés dans la société canadienne d’aujourd’hui se comparent-ils à ceux d’autres époques et d’autres sociétés (p. ex. discrimination systémique, racisme déclaré)?
  • Les rôles des individus et des organismes gouvernementaux et non gouvernementaux, y compris les groupes qui représentent les peuples autochtones:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • Nations Unies
      • Cour pénale internationale
      • Organisation mondiale du commerce
      • aide internationale
      • activistes
      • groupes de pression
      • organismes d’aide internationale (p. ex. Médecins Sans Frontières)
      • fondations privées (p. ex. Fondation Bill & Melinda Gates)
  • Les différents régimes politiques:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • comparer les caractéristiques du gouvernement fédéral du Canada à celles de gouvernements d’autres pays, notamment :
        • les rôles et les responsabilités des membres du gouvernement (p. ex. premier ministre, président, gouverneur, député, sénateur)
        • les institutions du gouvernement (Chambre des communes, Chambre des lords, sénat, province, État, préfecture, canton)
        • les structures de prise de décision du gouvernement et les formes d’exercice du pouvoir (p. ex. monarchie, république, dictature, démocratie parlementaire)
        • les processus électoraux (p. ex. partis politiques, élections, représentation)
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • gouvernance autochtone
    • Questions clés :
      • Qui profite des différents types de régimes politiques et de processus décisionnels?
      • En quoi les décisions seraient-elles différentes sous un autre régime politique?
  • Les politiques économiques et la gestion des ressources, y compris les conséquences sur les peuples autochtones:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • déforestation
      • mines
      • pétrole et gaz
      • pêcheries
      • développement des infrastructures
      • déplacement des communautés
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment les décisions sur la politique économique et la gestion des ressources devraient-elles être prises?
      • Comment les sociétés devraient-elles équilibrer le développement économique et la protection de l’environnement?
  • La mondialisation et l’interdépendance économique:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • commerce
      • importation et exportation
      • G20 (Groupe des Vingt)
      • Union européenne
      • Accord de libre-échange nord-américain (ALENA)
      • devises
      • tarifs et taxes
      • déséquilibres commerciaux
  • La coopération internationale et la réaction aux enjeux mondiaux:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • enjeux environnementaux
      • commerce d’êtres humains
      • main-d’œuvre enfantine
      • réactions aux épidémies et aux pandémies
      • gestion de la pêche
      • bonne et mauvaise utilisation des ressources
      • trafic de stupéfiants
      • répartition des ressources alimentaires et famine
  • Les conflits régionaux et internationaux:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • guerre
      • génocide
      • enfants soldats
      • conflits frontaliers
      • violence religieuse et ethnique
      • terrorisme
  • Les applications technologiques dans le domaine des médias et la couverture des événements d’actualité:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • propriété des médias
      • propagande
      • parti-pris éditorial
      • sensationnalisme
      • liberté de la presse
      • bonne et mauvaise utilisation des médias sociaux
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment les médias influencent-ils la perception par le public des grands événements de l’actualité?
      • Certaines sources médiatiques sont-elles plus dignes de confiance que d’autres? Explique ta réponse.
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes