Curriculum English Language Arts Kindergarten

Subject: 
English Language Arts
Grade: 
Kindergarten
Big Ideas: 
Language and story can be a source of creativity and joy. 
Stories and other texts help us learn about ourselves and our families.
Stories and other texts can be shared through pictures and words.
Everyone has a unique story to share.
Through listening and speaking, we connect with others and share our world.
Playing with language helps us discover how language works.
Curiosity and wonder lead us to new discoveries about ourselves and the world around us.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • story: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • stories: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • texts: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    - Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    - Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    - Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    - Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    - Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
Curricular Competencies: 
Comprehend and connect (reading, listening, viewing)
  • Use sources of information and prior knowledge to make meaning
  • Use developmentally appropriate reading, listening, and viewing strategies to make meaning
  • Explore foundational concepts of print, oral, and visual texts
  • Engage actively as listeners, viewers, and readers, as appropriate, to develop understanding of self, identity, and community
  • Recognize the importance of story in personal, family, and community identity
  • Use personal experience and knowledge to connect to stories and other texts to make meaning
  • Recognize the structure of story
Create and communicate (writing, speaking, representing)
  • Exchange ideas and perspectives to build shared understanding
  • Use language to identify, create, and share ideas, feelings, opinions, and preferences
  • Create stories and other texts to deepen awareness of self, family, and community
  • Plan and create stories and other texts for different purposes and audiences
  • Explore oral storytelling processes
 
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • texts: Text and texts are generic terms referring all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    - Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories
    - Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories
    - Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images
    - Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above
    - Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements)
  • prior knowledge: personal stories and experiences
  • reading, listening, and viewing strategies: examples include distinguishing drawing from writing, asking questions to construct and clarify meaning, using active listening, predicting, making connections to self
  • foundational concepts of print, oral, and visual texts: concepts include directionality of print, difference between letter and word, difference between writing and drawing, spacing, letter-sound relationship, understanding that pictures convey meaning, taking turns, expressing ideas and needs, and role-playing
  • engage actively as listeners, viewers, and readers: connecting to personal knowledge, experiences, and traditions; participating in community and cultural traditions and practices; asking questions related to the topic at hand
  • story: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • stories: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • structure of story: beginning, middle, end (or first, then, last)
  • exchange ideas and perspectives: taking turns in offering ideas related to the topic at hand, focusing on the speaker without interrupting, and generally contributing to the discussion
  • plan and create stories and other texts: involves experimenting with print and storytelling; supporting communication, including through stories and the use of manipulatives such as puppets, storyboards, digital tools, and toys
  • oral storytelling processes: creating an original story or finding an existing story (with permission), sharing the story from memory with others, using vocal expression to clarify the meaning of the text
Concepts and Content: 
  • Story
    • structure of story
    • literary elements and devices
  • Strategies and processes
    • reading strategies
    • oral language strategies
    • metacognitive strategies
    • writing processes
  • Language features, structures, and conventions
    • concepts of print
    • letter knowledge
    • phonemic and phonological awareness
    • letter formation
    • the relationship between reading, writing, and oral language
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • structure of story: beginning, middle, end (or first, then, last)
  • literary elements and devices: examples include sound concepts (e.g., rhyme, rhythm, musical, and poetical qualities of language) and humorous and creative texts (e.g., tongue twisters, nursery rhymes, fables, traditional stories)
  • reading strategies: making meaning using predictions and connections; making meaning from story using pictures, patterns, memory, and prior knowledge; retelling some elements of story; and recognizing familiar words/names and environmental print (e.g., street signs, food packaging)
  • oral language strategies: adjusting volume, pace, tone, and articulation; focusing on the speaker; taking turns; asking questions related to the topic; making personal connections; making relevant contributions to discussion
  • metacognitive strategies: talking and thinking about learning (e.g., through reflecting, questioning, goal setting, self-evaluating) to develop awareness of self as a reader and as a writer
  • concepts of print: the conventional features of written English, such as:
    - the symbolic nature of writing
    - the correspondence of spoken words to printed words (one-to-one matching)
    - the association of letters and sounds
    - the distinctive features of letters and words
    - the correspondence between uppercase and lowercase letters
    - left-to-right directionality
    - the use of space to mark word boundaries
    - the use of specific signs and symbols for punctuation (e.g., period, exclamation point, question mark)
    - front and back of a book
  • letter knowledge: recognizing and naming most letters of the alphabet, recognizing most letter-sound matches, recognizing some familiar words
  • phonemic and phonological awareness: Phonological refers to the sounds of words (as opposed to their meanings):
    - Phonemic awareness is a specific aspect of a learner’s phonological awareness: a child’s ability to segment spoken words into phonemes (e.g., c / a / t) and to blend phonemes into words indicates a developing phonemic awareness.
    - Phonological awareness involves the abilities to hear and create rhyming words, segment the flow of speech into separate words, and hear syllables as “chunks” in spoken words.
  • letter formation: the use of scribble writing or letter strings to communicate meaning; distinguishes drawing from writing
Big Ideas FR: 

La langue et les histoires peuvent procurer du plaisir et stimuler la créativité.  
Les histoires et les autres textes nous aident à apprendre sur nous-mêmes et sur notre famille.
Les histoires et les autres textes peuvent être véhiculés par des images et des mots.
Chacun a une histoire unique à faire connaître.
En écoutant et en parlant, nous entrons en relation avec les autres et leur faisons découvrir notre monde.
Jouer avec la langue nous aide à découvrir son fonctionnement.
La curiosité et l’émerveillement nous font faire des découvertes sur nous-mêmes et sur le monde qui nous entoure.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • Histoire : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • histoires : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • texte : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • textes : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
competencies_fr: 
Comprendre et faire des liens (lire, écouter, visionner)
  • Utiliser des sources d’information et ses connaissances antérieures pour construire le sens
  • Adopter des stratégies de lecture, d’écoute et de visionnement adaptées à son âge pour construire le sens
  • Explorer les concepts fondamentaux des textes écrits, oraux et visuels
  • Écouter, visionner et lire activement, selon le cas, pour développer une compréhension de soi-même, de son identité et de sa communauté
  • Reconnaître l’importance des histoires dans la construction de l’identité personnelle, familiale et communautaire
  • Utiliser ses expériences et ses connaissances personnelles pour faire des liens avec les histoires et d’autres textes et construire le sens
  • Reconnaître la structure de l’histoire
Créer et communiquer (écrire, parler, représenter)
  • Échanger des idées et des perspectives pour construire une compréhension partagée
  • Utiliser la langue pour reconnaître, créer et exprimer des idées, des sentiments, des opinions et des préférences
  • Créer des histoires et d’autres textes pour approfondir la conscience de soi, de sa famille et de sa communauté
  • Planifier et créer des histoires et d’autres textes pour atteindre des objectifs et des publics variés
  • Explorer les procédés de narration orale
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Texte : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle ou numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • textes : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle ou numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • Connaissances antérieures : histoires et expériences personnelles
  • Stratégies de lecture, d’écoute et de visionnement : par exemple, faire la distinction entre le dessin et l’écriture, poser des questions pour construire ou clarifier le sens, écouter activement, faire des prédictions, faire des liens avec ses expériences personnelles
  • Concepts fondamentaux des textes écrits, oraux et visuels : par exemple, l’écriture de gauche à droite, les différences entre les lettres et les mots, les différences entre l’écriture et le dessin, les espaces entre les mots, les relations entre les lettres et les sons, la compréhension du fait que les images véhiculent du sens, le respect du tour de parole, l’expression d’idées et de besoins, et les jeux de rôle
  • Écouter, visionner et lire activement : par exemple, faire des liens avec ses propres connaissances, expériences et traditions; participer à des traditions et à des pratiques communautaires et culturelles; poser des questions sur le sujet abordé
  • Histoire : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • Histoires : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • Structure de l’histoire : début, milieu, fin (en premier, ensuite, en dernier)
  • Échanger des idées et des perspectives : par exemple, exprimer des idées sur le sujet abordé en respectant le tour de parole, écouter attentivement la personne qui parle sans l’interrompre et contribuer de manière générale à la discussion
  • Planifier et créer des histoires et d’autres textes : par exemple, expérimenter l’écrit et la narration; soutenir la communication, notamment raconter des histoires en utilisant du matériel de manipulation, comme des marionnettes, des scénarios, des outils numériques et des jouets
  • Procédés de narration orale : créer une histoire originale ou trouver une histoire qui existe déjà (obtenir la permission de l’utiliser), raconter l’histoire à d’autres de mémoire, utiliser l’expression vocale pour clarifier le sens du texte
content_fr: 
  • histoire
    • la structure de l’histoire
    • les éléments et procédés littéraires
  • stratégies et procédés
    • les stratégies de lecture
    • les stratégies de communication orale
    • les stratégies métacognitives
    • les procédés d’écriture
  • caractéristiques, structures et conventions linguistiques
    • les concepts de l’écrit
    • la connaissance des lettres
    • la conscience phonémique et phonologique
    • la formation des lettres
    • la relation entre la lecture, l’écriture et la langue orale
content elaborations fr: 
  • Structure de l’histoire : début, milieu, fin (en premier, ensuite, en dernier)
  • Éléments et procédés littéraires : par exemple, les concepts sonores (p. ex. rimes et qualités rythmiques, musicales et poétiques de la langue) et les textes créatifs et humoristiques (p. ex. virelangues, comptines, fables, histoires traditionnelles)
  • Stratégies de lecture : construire le sens en faisant des prédictions et des liens; construire le sens à partir d’images, de régularités, de souvenirs et de connaissances antérieures; relater certains éléments de l’histoire; reconnaître les mots et les noms familiers et les écrits dans l’environnement (p. ex. panneaux de signalisation, emballages des aliments)
  • Stratégies de communication orale : ajuster le volume, le rythme, le ton et l’articulation; écouter attentivement la personne qui parle; respecter le tour de parole; poser des questions sur le sujet; faire des liens personnels; contribuer à la discussion de manière pertinente
  • Stratégies métacognitives : réfléchir à ses apprentissages et en discuter (p. ex. réflexion, questionnement, établissement d’objectifs, autoévaluation) pour développer une conscience de soi en tant que lecteur et scripteur]
  • Concepts de l’écrit : les caractéristiques conventionnelles de l’anglais écrit, par exemple :
    • la nature symbolique de l’écriture
    • la correspondance biunivoque entre le mot écrit et le mot parlé
    • la correspondance entre les lettres et les sons
    • les caractéristiques distinctives des lettres et des mots
    • la correspondance entre les lettres majuscules et minuscules
    • l’écriture de gauche à droite
    • l’utilisation des espaces pour délimiter les mots
    • l’utilisation de signes et de symboles spécifiques pour la ponctuation (p. ex. point, point d’exclamation, point d’interrogation)
    • le devant et l’arrière d’un livre
  • Connaissance des lettres : reconnaître et nommer la majorité des lettres de l’alphabet, reconnaître la majorité des correspondances phonème-graphème, reconnaître certains mots courants
  • Conscience phonémique et phonologique : la phonologie s’intéresse aux sons qui forment les mots (et non au sens des mots)
    • la conscience phonémique est un aspect spécifique de la conscience phonologique. La capacité de segmenter les mots parlés en phonèmes (p. ex. c / a / t) et à manipuler les phonèmes pour former des mots indique le développement d’une conscience phonémique chez l’enfant  
    • la conscience phonologique correspond à la capacité d’entendre et de créer des rimes, de segmenter la parole en mots et d’entendre les unités syllabiques dans les mots parlés
  • Formation des lettres : utiliser des ébauches d’écrits ou des chaînes de lettres pour communiquer le sens; faire la distinction entre le dessin et l’écriture
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes