Curriculum English Language Arts Grade 6

Subject: 
English Language Arts
Grade: 
Grade 6
Big Ideas: 
Language and text can be a source of creativity and joy.
Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world.
Exploring and sharing multiple perspectives extends our thinking.
Developing our understanding of how language works allows us to use it purposefully.
Questioning what we hear, read, and view contributes to our ability to be educated and engaged citizens.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • stories: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • text: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • texts: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
Curricular Competencies: 
Comprehend and connect (reading, listening, viewing)
  • Access information and ideas for diverse purposes and from a variety of sources and evaluate their relevance, accuracy, and reliability
  • Apply appropriate strategies to comprehend written, oral, and visual texts, guide inquiry, and extend thinking
  • Synthesize ideas from a variety of sources to build understanding
  • Recognize and appreciate how different features, forms, and genres of texts reflect various purposes, audiences, and messages
  • Think critically, creatively, and reflectively to explore ideas within, between, and beyond texts
  • Recognize and identify the role of personal, social, and cultural contexts, values, and perspectives in texts
  • Recognize how language constructs personal, social, and cultural identity
  • Construct meaningful personal connections between self, text, and world
  • Respond to text in personal, creative, and critical ways
  • Understand how literary elements, techniques, and devices enhance and shape meaning
  • Recognize an increasing range of text structures and how they contribute to meaning
  • Recognize and appreciate the role of story, narrative, and oral tradition in expressing First Peoples perspectives, values, beliefs, and points of view
Create and communicate (writing, speaking, representing)
  • Exchange ideas and viewpoints to build shared understanding and extend thinking
  • Use writing and design processes to plan, develop, and create engaging and meaningful literary and informational texts for a variety of purposes and audiences
  • Assess and refine texts to improve their clarity, effectiveness, and impact according to purpose, audience, and message
  • Use an increasing repertoire of conventions of Canadian spelling, grammar, and punctuation
  • Use and experiment with oral storytelling processes
  • Select and use appropriate features, forms, and genres according to audience, purpose, and message
  • Transform ideas and information to create original texts
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • text: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • texts: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • diverse purposes: may include to inquire, to explore, to inform, to interpret, to explain, to take a position, to propose a solution, to entertain
  • variety of sources: includes digital sources; students need to develop the language and tools to successfully navigate digital media (e.g., be familiar with terms and concepts such as browser, cookie, browsing history, hyperlinked text, thread, URL, posting etiquette, privacy)
  • relevance: Students should be prompted to ask: Does it meet the purpose? Is it current? Does it add new information?
  • accuracy: Students should be prompted to distinguish fact from opinion and to consider the source of the information.
  • reliability: Students should be prompted to consider the credibility of the source
  • inquiry: asking creative and critical questions supported and inspired by texts
  • extend thinking: may include questioning and speculating, acquiring new ideas, analyzing and evaluating ideas, developing explanations, considering alternative points of view, summarizing, synthesizing, problem solving
  • different features, forms, and genres of texts: vary depending on the purpose and audience of the text; students should be encouraged to consider the role of elements used in various texts (e.g., illustration in graphic novels, advertisements on websites, use of music, paragraph length, pause and pace in spoken word, use of colour)
  • think critically, creatively, and reflectively: questioning, interpreting, comparing, and contrasting a range of texts (e.g., narrative, poetry, visual texts); useful strategies for students include “exit slips,” “one star, one wish,” and quick activities to identify thinking
  • personal, social, and cultural contexts, values, and perspectives: Students should be prompted to consider the influence of family, friends, activities, religion, gender, and place on texts, and the relationship between text and context.
  • how language constructs personal, social, and cultural identity: Our sense of individuality and belonging is a product of, for example, the language we use; oral tradition, story, and recorded history; cultural aspects; and formal and informal language use. Students should be prompted to consider the impact of language in their lives.
  • personal, creative, and critical ways: Students should be prompted to analyze their personal connection to text, explain their responses (rational and emotional), and consider texts from different points of view.
  • literary elements, techniques, and devices: may include characterization, mood, foreshadowing, conflict, protagonist/antagonist, theme, imagery, sound devices
  • story: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • stories: narrative texts, whether real or imagined, that teach us about human nature, motivation, and experience, and often reflect a personal journey or strengthen a sense of identity. They may also be considered the embodiment of collective wisdom. Stories can be oral, written, or visual, and used to instruct, inspire, and entertain listeners and readers.
  • oral tradition: the means by which culture is transmitted over generations other than through written records
    • Among First Peoples, oral tradition may consist of told stories, songs, and other types of distilled wisdom or information, often complemented by dance or various forms of visual representation, such as carvings or masks.
    • In addition to expressing spiritual and emotional truth (e.g., by symbol and metaphor), it provides a record of literal truth (e.g., about events and situations).
    • The oral tradition was once integrated into every facet of life of First Peoples and was the basis of the education system.
  • literary and informational texts: may include opinion pieces; poetry; short stories; narrative; slams; spoken word; storyboards and comic strips; masks; multimedia and multimodal forms.
  • audience: students at this level expand their understanding of the range of audiences to include peers and authorities, and use formal and informal language according to audience
  • audiences: students at this level expand their understanding of the range of audiences to include peers and authorities, and use formal and informal language according to audience
  • refine texts: using techniques such as using verbs effectively, using repetition and substitution for effect, adding modifiers, varying sentence types, using precise diction
  • oral storytelling processes: creating an original story or finding an existing story (with permission), sharing the story from memory with others, using vocal expression to clarify the meaning of the text, using non-verbal communication expressively to clarify the meaning, attending to stage presence, differentiating the storyteller’s natural voice from the characters’ voices, presenting the story efficiently, keeping the listener’s interest throughout
Concepts and Content: 
  • Story/text
    • formsfunctions, and genres of text
    • text features
    • literary elements
    • literary devices
    • techniques of persuasion
  • Strategies and processes
    • reading strategies
    • oral language strategies
    • metacognitive strategies
    • writing processes
  • Language features, structures, and conventions
    • features of oral language
    • paragraphing
    • language varieties
    • sentence structure and grammar
    • conventions
    • presentation techniques
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • forms: such as narrative, exposition, report
  • functions: purposes of text
  • genres: literary or thematic categories such as fantasy, humour, adventure, biography
  • text: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • texts: Text and texts are generic terms referring to all forms of oral, written, visual, and digital communication:
    • Oral texts include speeches, poems, plays, and oral stories.
    • Written texts include novels, articles, and short stories.
    • Visual texts include posters, photographs, and other images.
    • Digital texts include electronic forms of all the above.
    • Oral, written, and visual elements can be combined (e.g., in dramatic presentations, graphic novels, films, web pages, advertisements).
  • text features: how text and visuals are displayed
  • literary elements: narrative structures, characterization, and setting
  • literary devices: sensory detail (e.g., imagery, sound devices), and figurative language (e.g., metaphor, simile)
  • techniques of persuasion: the use of emotional and logical appeals to persuade
  • reading strategies: using contextual clues; using phonics and word structure; visualizing; questioning; predicting; previewing text; summarizing; making inferences
  • oral language strategies: focusing on the speaker, asking questions to clarify, listening for specifics, expressing opinions, speaking with expression, staying on topic, taking turns
  • metacognitive strategies: talking and thinking about learning (e.g., through reflecting, questioning, goal setting, self-evaluating) to develop one’s awareness of self as a reader and as a writer
  • writing processes: may include revising, editing, considering audience
  • features of oral language: including tone, volume, inflection, pace, gestures
  • paragraphing: developing paragraphs that are characterized by unity, development, and coherence
  • language varieties: regional dialects and varieties of English, standard Canadian English versus American English, formal versus informal registers, and situational varieties (e.g., texting versus essay writing)
  • sentence structure and grammar: varied sentence structure, pronoun use, subject-verb agreement, use of transitional words, awareness of run-on sentences and sentence fragments
  • conventions: common practices in all standard punctuation use, in capitalization, and in Canadian spelling
  • presentation techniques: Any presentation (in written, oral, or digital form) should reflect an appropriate choice of medium for the purpose and audience, and demonstrate thought and care in organization.
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
La langue et les textes peuvent procurer du plaisir et stimuler la créativité.
Explorer les histoires et d’autres textes nous aide à nous comprendre nous-mêmes et à entrer en relation avec les autres et le monde.
Explorer et partager de multiples perspectives nous permet d’élargir notre réflexion.
Développer notre compréhension du fonctionnement de la langue nous permet d’utiliser celle-ci à des fins précises.
Le fait de questionner ce que nous entendons, lisons et voyons nous aide à devenir des citoyens instruits et engagés.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • Histoire : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • histoires : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • Texte : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • textes : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
competencies_fr: 
Comprendre et faire des liens (lire, écouter, visionner)
  • Accéder à de l’information et à des idées pour des buts variés et à partir de sources variées, et en évaluer la pertinence, l’exactitude et la fiabilité
  • Adopter des stratégies appropriées pour comprendre des textes écrits, oraux et visuels, orienter l’investigation et élargir la réflexion
  • Synthétiser des idées provenant d’une variété de sources afin de construire une compréhension
  • Reconnaître et apprécier comment différents genres de texte et différentes caractéristiques et formes sont employés pour transmettre un message et atteindre un but et un public
  • Penser de manière critique, créative et réfléchie pour explorer les idées contenues dans les textes et pousser plus loin la réflexion
  • Cerner et reconnaître le rôle des valeurs, des perspectives et des contextes personnels, sociaux et culturels dans les textes
  • Reconnaître le rôle de la langue dans la construction de l’identité personnelle, familiale et communautaire
  • Faire des liens personnels significatifs entre soi, le texte et le monde
  • Réagir à un texte de manière personnelle, créative et critique
  • Comprendre comment les éléments, les techniques et les procédés littéraires enrichissent et façonnent le sens
  • Reconnaître un nombre croissant de structures de texte et la façon dont elles contribuent au sens
  • Reconnaître et apprécier le rôle des histoires, des récits et de la tradition orale dans l’expression des perspectives, des valeurs, des croyances et des points de vue des peuples autochtones
Créer et communiquer (écrire, parler, représenter)
  • Échanger des idées et des perspectives pour construire une compréhension partagée et élargir la réflexion
  • Utiliser des procédés d’écriture et de conception pour planifier, développer et créer des textes littéraires et informatifs intéressants et significatifs visant une variété d’objectifs et de publics
  • Évaluer et peaufiner les textes pour améliorer leur clarté, leur efficacité et leur portée en fonction du but escompté, du public ciblé et du message véhiculé
  • Utiliser un répertoire toujours plus grand des conventions de l’orthographe, de la grammaire et de la ponctuation de l’anglais du Canada
  • Utiliser et expérimenter les procédés de narration orale
  • Choisir et utiliser des caractéristiques, des formes et des genres en fonction du public, du but et du message
  • Transformer des idées et de l’information pour créer des textes originaux
     
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Texte : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle ou numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • textes : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle ou numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • Buts variés : par exemple, pour enquêter, explorer, informer, interpréter, expliquer, prendre position, proposer une solution, divertir
  • Sources variées : y compris des sources numériques; les élèves doivent maîtriser le langage et les outils des médias numériques (p. ex. ils doivent comprendre des termes et des concepts comme navigateur, témoin de connexion, historique de navigation, texte en hyperlien, fil de discussion, URL, étiquette de publication, respect de la vie privée)
  • Pertinence : les élèves doivent être amenés à se demander si le texte atteint son objectif, s’il est actuel et s’il contient de l’information nouvelle
  • Exactitude : les élèves doivent être amenés à faire la distinction entre les faits et les opinions, et à se questionner sur la source d’information
  • Fiabilité : les élèves doivent être amenés à se questionner sur la crédibilité de la source
  • Investigation : poser des questions créatives et critiques étayées et inspirées par des textes
  • Élargir la réflexion : notamment, questionner, spéculer, acquérir de nouvelles idées, analyser et évaluer des idées, expliquer, envisager d’autres points de vue, résumer, synthétiser, résoudre des problèmes
  • Différents genres de texte et différentes caractéristiques et formes: ces éléments varient selon le but escompté du texte et son public cible; les élèves doivent être encouragés à examiner le rôle de ces éléments dans divers textes (p. ex. illustrations dans les BD romans, publicités sur les sites Web, utilisation de la musique, longueur des paragraphes, pause et rythme dans la poésie orale, utilisation de la couleur)
  • Penser de manière critique, créative et réfléchie : questionner, interpréter, comparer et opposer une gamme de textes (p. ex. récit, poème, texte visuel); utiliser des stratégies d’évaluation rapide comme des fiches de lecture, l’attribution d’étoiles et de souhaits à un texte par les élèves et des activités rapides pour engager la réflexion
  • Valeurs, perspectives et contextes personnels, sociaux et culturels : les élèves doivent être amenés à réfléchir sur l’influence de la famille, des amis, des activités, de la religion, du genre et du lieu sur les textes, et le lien entre le texte et le contexte
  • Rôle de la langue dans la construction de l’identité personnelle, familiale et communautaire: nos sentiments d’individualité et d’appartenance sont façonnés par divers éléments : la langue employée, la tradition orale, les récits, l’histoire consignée, la culture, le registre de langue (familier ou soutenu). Les élèves doivent être amenés à réfléchir sur les répercussions de la langue dans leur vie
  • Réagir à un texte de manière personnelle, créative et critique : les élèves doivent être amenés à analyser leur rapport au texte, à expliquer leurs réactions (rationnelles et émotionnelles) et à aborder les textes de différents points de vue
  • Les éléments, les techniques et les procédés littéraires : notamment présentation des personnages, ambiance, présage, conflit, protagoniste et antagoniste, thème, imagerie et sonorités
  • Histoire : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • histoires : textes narratifs, réels ou imaginaires, qui nous apprennent à connaître la nature des personnes, leurs motivations et leurs expériences, et qui témoignent souvent d’un cheminement personnel ou renforcent l’identité. On peut également considérer que les histoires sont les dépositaires d’une sagesse collective. Les histoires peuvent être orales, écrites ou visuelles, et être utilisées pour instruire, inspirer et divertir les auditeurs et les lecteurs
  • Tradition orale : transmission de la culture d’une génération à l’autre autrement que par l’écrit
    • chez les peuples autochtones, la tradition orale transmet une sagesse et de l’information, notamment sous la forme de chants ou d’histoires souvent accompagnés de danses ou d’éléments visuels, comme des sculptures ou des masques
    • en plus d’exprimer des vérités spirituelles et émotionnelles (p. ex. par les symboles et les métaphores), la tradition orale permet de consigner des vérités historiques (p. ex. des événements et des situations)
    • autrefois, la tradition orale était intégrée à toutes les facettes de la vie et était à la base du système d’éducation des peuples autochtones
  • Textes littéraires et informatifs : notamment, article d’opinion; poème; nouvelle; récit; slam; poésie orale; scénarimage et bande dessinée; masque; textes multimédias et multimodaux
  • Public : à ce niveau, les élèves élargissent leur compréhension de l’éventail de publics pour y inclure les pairs et les autorités, et emploient un niveau de langue adapté à leur public (familier ou soutenu)
  • publics : à ce niveau, les élèves élargissent leur compréhension de l’éventail de publics pour y inclure les pairs et les autorités, et emploient un niveau de langue adapté à leur public (familier ou soutenu)
  • Peaufiner les textes : par des techniques comme l’utilisation efficace des verbes, l’usage de la répétition et de la substitution pour créer un effet, l’ajout de modificateurs, le recours à divers types de phrases, l’emploi d’une diction précise
  • Procédés de narration orale : créer une histoire originale ou trouver une histoire qui existe déjà (obtenir la permission de l’utiliser), raconter l’histoire à d’autres de mémoire, utiliser l’expression vocale pour clarifier le sens du texte, s’exprimer de manière non verbale pour clarifier le sens, avoir une présence scénique, faire la distinction entre la voix du narrateur et celles des personnages, présenter l’histoire de manière efficace, susciter l’intérêt de l’auditoire tout au long de l’histoire
content_fr: 
  • histoires et textes
    • les formes, fonctions et genres des textes
    • les caractéristiques des textes
    • les éléments littéraires
    • les procédés littéraires
    • les techniques de persuasion
  • stratégies et procédés
    • les stratégies de lecture
    • les stratégies de communication orale
    • les stratégies métacognitives
    • les procédés d’écriture
  • caractéristiques, structures et conventions linguistiques
    • les caractéristiques de la langue orale
    • l’organisation des paragraphes
    • les variétés linguistiques
    • la structure des phrases et la grammaire
    • les conventions
    • les techniques de présentation
content elaborations fr: 
  • Formes : par exemple, texte narratif, texte explicatif, rapport
  • Fonctions : buts escomptés du texte
  • Genres : catégories littéraires ou thématiques, comme la fantaisie, l’humour, l’aventure, la biographie
  • Texte : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités)
  • textes : termes génériques faisant référence à toutes les formes de communication orale, écrite, visuelle et numérique :
    • les textes oraux peuvent prendre la forme de discours, de poèmes, de pièces de théâtre et d’histoires orales
    • les textes écrits peuvent prendre la forme de romans, d’articles et de nouvelles
    • les textes visuels peuvent prendre la forme d’affiches, de photographies et d’autres types d’images
    • les textes numériques sont tous les textes ci-dessus présentés en format électronique
    • les éléments oraux, écrits et visuels peuvent être combinés (p. ex. dans des représentations théâtrales, des BD romans, des films, des pages Web, des publicités
  • Caractéristiques des textes : présentation du texte et des éléments visuels
  • Éléments littéraires : structures narratives, présentation des personnages et contexte
  • Procédés littéraires : perception sensorielle (p. ex. imagerie, sonorités) et langage figuré (p. ex. métaphore, comparaison)
  • Techniques de persuasion : faire appel aux émotions et à la logique pour persuader
  • Stratégies de lecture : utiliser les indices fournis par le contexte; utiliser les sons et la structure des mots; visualiser; questionner; prédire; faire une prélecture; résumer; faire des inférences
  • Stratégies de communication orale : écouter attentivement la personne qui parle, poser des questions pour clarifier; être à l’écoute des détails, exprimer des opinions, parler avec expressivité, ne pas dévier du sujet, respecter le tour de parole
  • Stratégies métacognitives : réfléchir à ses apprentissages et en discuter (p. ex. réflexion, questionnement, établissement d’objectifs, autoévaluation) pour développer une conscience de soi en tant que lecteur et scripteur
  • Procédés d’écriture : par exemple, réviser, éditer, tenir compte du public cible
  • Caractéristiques de la langue orale : par exemple, le ton, le volume, les inflexions, le rythme, les gestes
  • Organisation des paragraphes : rédiger des paragraphes qui sont bien développés et qui respectent les règles de cohérence et de cohésion
  • Variétés linguistiques : les dialectes régionaux et les variétés de l’anglais, l’anglais standard du Canada par rapport à l’anglais standard des États-Unis, le registre soutenu par rapport au registre familier et les variétés situationnelles (p. ex. le texto par rapport à l’essai)
  • Structure des phrases et la grammaire : emploi de structures de phrase variées, emploi du pronom, accord sujet-verbe, emploi de mots de transition et prise de conscience des problèmes de ponctuation et des phrases incomplètes
  • Conventions : pratiques courantes pour l’ensemble de la ponctuation standard, l’utilisation des majuscules et l’orthographe de l’anglais du Canada
  • Techniques de présentation : toute présentation (écrite, orale ou numérique) doit démontrer le choix d’un média adapté au public ciblé et à l’objectif escompté et une organisation minutieuse et réfléchie 
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes