Curriculum Mathematics Grade 7

Subject: 
Mathematics
Grade: 
Grade 7
Big Ideas: 
Decimals, fractions, and percents are used to represent and describe parts and wholes of numbers.
Computational fluency and flexibility with numbers extend to operations with integers and decimals.
Linear relations can be represented in many connected ways to identify regularities and make generalizations.
The constant ratio between the circumference and diameter of circles can be used to describe, measure, and compare spatial relationships.
Data from circle graphs can be used to illustrate proportion and to compare and interpret.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • numbers:
    • Number: Number represents and describes quantity.
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • In how many ways can you represent the number ___?
      • What is the relationship between decimals, fractions, and percents?
      • How can you prove equivalence?
      • How are parts and wholes best represented in particular contexts?
  • fluency:
    • Computational Fluency: Computational fluency develops from a strong sense of number.
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • When we are working with integers, what is the relationship between addition and subtraction?
      • When we are working with integers, what is the relationship between multiplication and division?
      • When we are working with integers, what is the relationship between addition and multiplication?
      • When we are working with integers, what is the relationship between subtraction and division?
  • Linear relations:
    • Patterning: We use patterns to represent identified regularities and to make generalizations.
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What is a linear relationship?
      • In how many ways can linear relationships be represented?
      • How do linear relationships differ?
      • What factors can change a linear relationship?
  • spatial relationships:
    • Geometry and Measurement: We can describe, measure, and compare spatial relationships.
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What is unique about the properties of circles?
      • What is the relationship between diameter and circumference?
      • What are the similarities and differences between the area and circumference of circles?
  • Data:
    • Data and Probability: Analyzing data and chance enables us to compare and interpret.
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How is a circle graph similar to and different from other types of visual representations of data?
      • When would you choose to use a circle graph to represent data?
      • How are circle graphs related to ratios, percents, decimals, and whole numbers?
      • How would circle graphs be informative or misleading?
Curricular Competencies: 
Reasoning and analyzing
  • Use logic and patterns to solve puzzles and play games
  • Use reasoning and logic to explore, analyze, and apply mathematical ideas
  • Estimate reasonably
  • Demonstrate and apply mental math strategies
  • Use tools or technology to explore and create patterns and relationships, and test conjectures
  • Model mathematics in contextualized experiences
Understanding and solving
  • Apply multiple strategies to solve problems in both abstract and contextualized situations
  • Develop, demonstrate, and apply mathematical understanding through play, inquiry, and problem solving
  • Visualize to explore mathematical concepts
  • Engage in problem-solving experiences that are connected to place, story, cultural practices, and perspectives relevant to local First Peoples communities, the local community, and other cultures
Communicating and representing
  • Use mathematical vocabulary and language to contribute to mathematical discussions
  • Explain and justify mathematical ideas and decisions
  • Communicate mathematical thinking in many ways
  • Represent mathematical ideas in concrete, pictorial, and symbolic forms
Connecting and reflecting
  • Reflect on mathematical thinking
  • Connect mathematical concepts to each other and to other areas and personal interests
  • Use mathematical arguments to support personal choices
  • Incorporate First Peoples worldviews and perspectives to make connections to mathematical concepts
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • logic and patterns:
    • including coding
  • reasoning and logic:
    • making connections, using inductive and deductive reasoning, predicting, generalizing, drawing conclusions through experiences
  • Estimate reasonably:
    • estimating using referents, approximation, and rounding strategies (e.g., the distance to the stop sign is approximately 1 km, the width of my finger is about 1 cm)
  • apply:
    • extending whole-number strategies to integers
    • working toward developing fluent and flexible thinking about number
  • Model:
    • acting it out, using concrete materials (e.g., manipulatives), drawing pictures or diagrams, building, programming
  • multiple strategies:
    • includes familiar, personal, and from other cultures
  • connected:
    • in daily activities, local and traditional practices, the environment, popular media and news events, cross-curricular integration
    • Patterns are important in First Peoples technology, architecture, and art.
    • Have students pose and solve problems or ask questions connected to place, stories, and cultural practices.
  • Explain and justify:
    • using mathematical arguments
  • Communicate:
    • concretely, pictorially, symbolically, and by using spoken or written language to express, describe, explain, justify, and apply mathematical ideas; may use technology such as screencasting apps, digital photos
  • Reflect:
    • sharing the mathematical thinking of self and others, including evaluating strategies and solutions, extending, and posing new problems and questions
  • other areas and personal interests:
    • to develop a sense of how mathematics helps us understand ourselves and the world around us (e.g., cross-discipline, daily activities, local and traditional practices, the environment, popular media and news events, and social justice)
  • personal choices:
    • including anticipating consequences
  • Incorporate First Peoples:
    • Invite local First Peoples Elders and knowledge keepers to share their knowledge
  • make connections:
    • Bishop’s cultural practices: counting, measuring, locating, designing, playing, explaining (csus.edu/indiv/o/oreyd/ACP.htm_files/abishop.htm)
    • aboriginaleducation.ca
    • Teaching Mathematics in a First Nations Context, FNESC fnesc.ca/k-7/
Concepts and Content: 
  • multiplication and division facts to 100 (extending computational fluency)
  • operations with integers (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and order of operations)
  • operations with decimals (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and order of operations)
  • relationships between decimals, fractions, ratios, and percents
  • discrete linear relations, using expressions, tables, and graphs
  • two-step equations with whole-number coefficients, constants, and solutions
  • circumference and area of circles
  • volume of rectangular prisms and cylinders
  • Cartesian coordinates and graphing
  • combinations of transformations
  • circle graphs
  • experimental probability with two independent events
  • financial literacy — financial percentage
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • facts to 100:
    • When multiplying 214 by 5, we can multiply by 10, then divide by 2 to get 1070.
  • operations with integers:
    • addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and order of operations
    • concretely, pictorially, symbolically
    • order of operations includes the use of brackets, excludes exponents
    • using two-sided counters
    • 9–(–4) = 13 because –4 is 13 away from +9
    • extending whole-number strategies to decimals
  • operations with decimals:
    • includes the use of brackets, but excludes exponents
  • relationships:
    • conversions, equivalency, and terminating versus repeating decimals, place value, and benchmarks
    • comparing and ordering decimals and fractions using the number line
    • ½ = 0.5 = 50% = 50:100
    • shoreline cleanup
  • discrete linear relations:
    • four quadrants, limited to integral coordinates
    • 3n + 2; values increase by 3 starting from y-intercept of 2
    • deriving relation from the graph or table of values
    • Small Number stories: Small Number and the Old Canoe, Small Number Counts to 100 (mathcatcher.irmacs.sfu.ca/stories)
  • two-step equations:
    • solving and verifying 3x + 4 = 16
    • modelling the preservation of equality (e.g., using balance, pictorial representation, algebra tiles)
    • spirit canoe trip pre-planning and calculations
    • Small Number stories: Small Number and the Big Tree (mathcatcher.irmacs.sfu.ca/stories)
  • circumference:
    • constructing circles given radius, diameter, area, or circumference
    • finding relationships between radius, diameter, circumference, and area to develop C = π x d formula
    • applying A = π x r x r formula to find the area given radius or diameter
    • drummaking, dreamcatcher making, stories of SpiderWoman (Dene, Cree, Hopi, Tsimshian), basket making, quill box making (Note: Local protocols should be considered when choosing an activity.)
  • volume:
    • volume = area of base x height
    • bentwood boxes, wiigwaasabak and mide-wiigwaas (birch bark scrolls)
    • Exploring Math through Haida Legends: Culturally Responsive Mathematics (haidanation.ca/Pages/language/haida_legends/media/Lessons/RavenLes4-9.pdf)
  • Cartesian coordinates:
    • origin, four quadrants, integral coordinates, connections to linear relations, transformations
    • overlaying coordinate plane on medicine wheel, beading on dreamcatcher, overlaying coordinate plane on traditional maps
  • transformations:
    • four quadrants, integral coordinates
    • translation(s), rotation(s), and/or reflection(s) on a single 2D shape; combination of successive transformations of 2D shapes; tessellations
    • First Peoples art, jewelry making, birchbark biting
  • circle graphs:
    • constructing, labelling, and interpreting circle graphs
    • translating percentages displayed in a circle graph into quantities and vice versa
    • visual representations of tidepools or traditional meals on plates
  • experimental probability:
    • experimental probability, multiple trials (e.g., toss two coins, roll two dice, spin a spinner twice, or a combination thereof)
    • dice games (web.uvic.ca/~tpelton/fn-math/fn-dicegames.html)
  • financial literacy:
    • financial percentage calculations
    • sales tax, tips, discount, sale price
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les nombres décimaux, les fractions et les pourcentages peuvent servir à représenter des nombres entiers et des parties de nombres.
L’habileté à effectuer des calculs et la facilité à manipuler les nombres s’appliquent aux opérations sur les nombres entiers et les nombres décimaux.
On peut représenter les relations linéaires de plusieurs manières équivalentes pour reconnaître les régularités et pour faire des généralisations.
Le rapport constant entre la circonférence et le diamètre d’un cercle peut servir à décrire, à mesurer et à comparer des relations géométriques.
Les données d’un diagramme circulaire peuvent servir à illustrer la proportion et à faire des comparaisons et des interprétations.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • Nombres :
    • Nombre : Un nombre représente et décrit une quantité.
      • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion des élèves :
        • De combien de façons peut-on représenter le nombre ___?
        • Quelle est la relation entre les nombres décimaux, les fractions et les pourcentages?
        • Comment prouver une équivalence?
        • Quelle est la meilleure manière de représenter des parties et des entiers dans tel ou tel contexte?
  • Facilité à manipuler les nombres :
    • Habileté à effectuer des calculs : Pour acquérir des habiletés à effectuer des calculs, il faut acquérir un bon sens du nombre.
      • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion des élèves :
        • Quelle est la relation entre l’addition et la soustraction des nombres entiers?
        • Quelle est la relation entre la multiplication et la division des nombres entiers?
        • Quelle est la relation entre l’addition et la multiplication des nombres entiers?
        • Quelle est la relation entre la soustraction et la division des nombres entiers?
  • Relations linéaires :
    • Régularités : On utilise les régularités pour représenter des récurrences connues et faire des généralisations.
      • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion des élèves :
        • Qu’est-ce qu’une relation linéaire?
        • De combien de manières peut-on représenter une relation linéaire?
        • Qu’est-ce qui distingue une relation linéaire?
        • Quels facteurs peuvent modifier une relation linéaire?
  • relations géométriques :
    • Géométrie et mesure : On peut décrire, mesurer et comparer les relations géométriques.
      • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion des élèves :
        • Quelles sont les propriétés qui caractérisent un cercle?
        • Quelle est la relation entre le diamètre et la circonférence d’un cercle?
        • Quelles sont les ressemblances et les différences entre l’aire et la circonférence d’un cercle?
  • Données :
    • Données et probabilité : L’analyse des données et la probabilité nous permettent de faire des comparaisons et des interprétations.
      • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion des élèves :
        • Quelles sont les ressemblances et les différences entre un diagramme circulaire et d’autres types de représentations graphiques des données?
        • Dans quelle situation serait-il approprié d’utiliser un diagramme circulaire pour représenter des données?
        • Comment les diagrammes circulaires représentent-ils les rapports, les pourcentages, les nombres décimaux et les entiers naturels?
        • Dans quelle situation un diagramme circulaire peut-il être informatif ou trompeur?
competencies_fr: 
Raisonner et analyser
  • Utiliser la logique et les régularités dans des jeux et pour résoudre des énigmes
  • Utiliser le raisonnement et la logique pour explorer, analyser et appliquer des concepts mathématiques
  • Estimer raisonnablement
  • Démontrer et appliquer des stratégies de calcul mental
  • Utiliser des outils technologiques pour explorer et concevoir des régularités et des relations, et pour vérifier la validité de conjectures
  • Modéliser les objets et les relations mathématiques dans des expériences contextualisées
Comprendre et résoudre
  • Appliquer des stratégies multiples pour résoudre des problèmes dans des situations abstraites et contextualisées
  • Élaborer, démontrer et appliquer des solutions mathématiques par le jeu, l’investigation et la résolution de problèmes
  • Explorer des concepts mathématiques par la visualisation
  • Réaliser des expériences de résolution de problèmes qui font référence de manière pertinente aux lieux, aux histoires, aux pratiques culturelles et aux perspectives des peuples autochtones de la région, de la communauté locale et d’autres cultures
Communiquer et représenter
  • Utiliser le vocabulaire et les symboles mathématiques pour contribuer à des discussions de nature mathématique
  • Expliquer et justifier des concepts et des décisions en se basant sur les mathématiques
  • Communiquer un concept mathématique de plusieurs façons
  • Représenter un objet mathématique par des formes concrètes, graphiques et symboliques
Faire des liens et réfléchir
  • Réfléchir sur la pensée mathématique
  • Faire des liens entre différents concepts mathématiques, et entre des concepts mathématiques et d’autres domaines et intérêts personnels
  • Utiliser des arguments mathématiques pour défendre des choix personnels
  • Intégrer les perspectives et les visions du monde des peuples autochtones pour faire des liens avec des concepts mathématiques
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • la logique et les régularités :
    • codage
  • le raisonnement et la logique :
    • faire des liens, employer le raisonnement inductif et déductif, prédire, faire des généralisations, tirer des conclusions par des expériences
  • Estimer raisonnablement :
    • estimer au moyen de référents, d’approximations et de règles permettant d’arrondir une mesure (p. ex.  le panneau d’arrêt est à environ 1 km de distance, la largeur de mon doigt est d’environ 1 cm)
  • Appliquer :
    • appliquer aux nombres entiers relatifs les stratégies propres aux nombres entiers naturels
    • acquérir une flexibilité et une facilité d’application des concepts reliés aux nombres
  • Modéliser :
    • mimer, utiliser du matériel concret (p. ex.  objets à manipuler), s’aider de dessins ou de diagrammes, construire, programmer
  • Stratégies multiples :
    • stratégies familières, personnelles et d’autres cultures
  • qui font référence :
    • aux activités quotidiennes, aux pratiques locales et traditionnelles, à l’environnement, aux médias populaires, aux événements d’actualité et à l’intégration interdisciplinaire
    • les régularités sont importantes dans les domaines de la technologie, de l’architecture et de l’art des peuples autochtones
    • demander aux élèves de formuler et de résoudre des problèmes et de poser des questions qui font référence aux lieux, aux histoires et aux pratiques culturelles
  • Expliquer et justifier :
    • au moyen d’arguments mathématiques
  • Communiquer :
    • de plusieurs façons (concrète, graphique, symbolique, à l’oral ou à l’écrit) pour exprimer, décrire, expliquer, justifier et appliquer des concepts mathématiques; à l’aide de la technologie (p. ex.  logiciels de vidéographie, photos numériques)
  • Réfléchir :
    • présenter le fruit de ses propres réflexions mathématiques et de celles d’autres personnes, y compris évaluer les stratégies et les solutions, acquérir la compréhension des concepts et formuler de nouveaux problèmes et questions
  • Autres domaines et intérêts personnels :
    • s’ouvrir au fait que les mathématiques peuvent aider à se connaître et à comprendre le monde qui nous entoure (p. ex.  compétences interdisciplinaires, activités quotidiennes, pratiques locales et traditionnelles, environnement, médias populaires, événements d’actualité et justice sociale)
  • Choix personnels :
    • anticiper les conséquences
  • Intégrer les perspectives et les visions du monde des peuples autochtones :
    • inviter des Aînés et des détenteurs du savoir des peuples autochtones de la région à partager leurs connaissances
  • faire des liens :
    • pratiques culturelles selon Bishop : compter, mesurer, localiser, concevoir, jouer, expliquer (csus.edu/indiv/o/oreyd/ACP.htm_files/abishop.htm) (en anglais seulement)
    • aboriginaleducation.ca (en anglais seulement)
    • Teaching Mathematics in a First Nations Context, FNESC fnesc.ca/k-7/ (en anglais seulement)
content_fr: 
  • les tables de multiplication et de division jusqu’à 100 (élargissement des habiletés propres aux opérations mathématiques) 
  • les opérations sur les nombres entiers relatifs (addition, soustraction, multiplication, division et priorité d’opérations)
  • les opérations sur les nombres décimaux (addition, soustraction, multiplication, division et priorité d’opérations)
  • les relations entre les nombres décimaux, les fractions, les rapports et les pourcentages
  • les relations linéaires discrètes, représentées par des expressions, des tables des valeurs et des graphiques
  • la résolution en deux étapes d’équations dans lesquelles les coefficients, les constantes et les solutions sont des nombres entiers naturels
  • la circonférence et l’aire d’un cercle
  • le volume d’un prisme rectangulaire et d’un cylindre
  • les coordonnées cartésiennes et les représentations graphiques
  • les combinaisons de transformations
  • les diagrammes circulaires
  • la probabilité expérimentale avec deux événements indépendants
  • la littératie financière – pourcentage financier 
content elaborations fr: 
  • tables de multiplication et de division jusqu’à 100 :
    • pour multiplier 214 par 5, on peut multiplier par 10, puis diviser par 2 pour obtenir 1070.
  • opérations sur les nombres entiers relatifs :
    • addition, soustraction, multiplication, division et priorité d’opérations
    • de façon concrète, graphique et symbolique
    • la priorité d’opérations comprend l’utilisation des parenthèses, mais pas les exposants
    • au moyen de jetons à compter
    • 9–(–4) = 13, car –4 est à 13 unités de +9
    • appliquer les stratégies propres aux nombres entiers naturels aux nombres décimaux
  • Opérations sur les nombres décimaux :
    • utilisation des parenthèses, mais pas des exposants
  • Relations :
    • conversions, équivalence et nombres décimaux dont la partie décimale est finie ou périodique, valeur de position et référents
    • comparer et ordonner les nombres décimaux et les fractions au moyen d’une droite numérique
    • ½ = 0,5 = 50 % = 50:100
    • représentation mathématique d’une activité, comme le nettoyage d’un rivage
  • Relations linéaires discrètes :
    • quatre quadrants, coordonnées qui sont des nombres entiers relatifs seulement
    • 3n + 2; les valeurs augmentent par 3 à partir de l’ordonnée à l’origine, qui est 2
    • dériver une relation à partir d’un graphique ou d’une table des valeurs
    • histoires de Small Number : Small Number and the Old Canoe, Small Number Counts to 100 (mathcatcher.irmacs.sfu.ca/stories) (en anglais seulement)
  • résolution en deux étapes d’équations :
    • résoudre 3x + 4 = 16 et vérifier la solution
    • modéliser le maintien de la relation d’égalité (p. ex.  au moyen d’une balance, d’une représentation graphique ou de carreaux algébriques)
    • planification et calculs liés à un voyage spirituel en canot
    • histoires de Small Number : Small Number and the Big Tree (mathcatcher.irmacs.sfu.ca/stories) (en anglais seulement)
  • Circonférence :
    • tracer des cercles si on connaît le rayon, ou le diamètre, ou l’aire ou la circonférence
    • découvrir les relations entre le rayon, le diamètre, la circonférence et l’aire pour trouver la formule C = π x d
    • appliquer la formule A = π x r x r pour calculer l’aire au moyen du rayon ou du diamètre
    • fabrication de tambours, fabrication d’un capteur de rêves, histoire de la femme-araignée (Déné, Cri, Hopi, Tsimshian), fabrication de paniers, fabrication de pipettes (Note : les protocoles locaux doivent être pris en considération dans le choix d’une activité.)
  • Volume :
    • volume = aire de la base x hauteur
    • boîtes en bois courbé, wiigwaasabak et mide-wiigwaas (rouleaux en écorce de bouleau)
    • Exploring Math through Haida Legends: Culturally Responsive Mathematics (haidanation.ca/Pages/language/haida_legends/media/Lessons/RavenLes4-9.pdf) (en anglais seulement)
  • Coordonnées cartésiennes :
    • origine, quatre quadrants, coordonnées étant des nombres entiers relatifs, liens avec les relations linéaires, transformations
    • superposition du plan cartésien sur une roue médicinale, billes sur un capteur de rêves, superposition du plan cartésien sur une carte traditionnelle
  • Transformations :
    • quatre quadrants, coordonnées étant des nombres entiers relatifs
    • translation(s), rotation(s) et/ou réflexion(s) d’une seule figure plane; combinaison de transformations successives de figures planes; tessellations
    • art des peuples autochtones, fabrication de bijoux, motifs mordillés sur écorce de bouleau
  • Diagrammes circulaires :
    • construire, reconnaître et interpréter des diagrammes circulaires
    • convertir des pourcentages représentés par un diagramme circulaire en quantités, et vice-versa
    • représentations graphiques de cuvettes de marée ou de plats traditionnels dans une assiette
  • Probabilité expérimentale :
    • probabilité expérimentale, essais multiples (p. ex.  lancer deux pièces de monnaie, lancer deux dés, faire tourner une aiguille deux fois, ou une combinaison de ces essais)
    • jeux de dés (web.uvic.ca/~tpelton/fn-math/fn-dicegames.html) (en anglais seulement)
  • Littératie financière :
    • calculs de pourcentages financiers
    • taxe de vente, pourboire, rabais, prix de vente 
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes