Curriculum Social Studies Kindergarten

Subject: 
Social Studies
Grade: 
Kindergarten
Big Ideas: 
Our communities are diverse and made of individuals who have a lot in common.
Stories and traditions about ourselves and our families reflect who we are and where we are from.
Rights, roles, and responsibilities shape our identity and help us build healthy relationships with others.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Explain the significance of personal or local events, objects, people, or places (significance)
  • Ask questions, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and features of different types of sources (evidence)
  • Sequence objects, images, or events, and distinguish between what has changed and what has stayed the same (continuity and change)
  • Recognize causes and consequences of events, decisions, or developments in their lives (cause and consequence)
  • Acknowledge different perspectives on people, places, issues, or events in their lives (perspective)
  • Identify fair and unfair aspects of events, decisions, or actions in their lives and consider appropriate courses of action (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Access information from audio, visual, material, or print sources.
      • Collect information from personal experiences, oral sources, and visual representations.
      • Contribute to a class collection of information on a common topic.
      • With teacher support, use simple graphic organizers (e.g., Venn diagrams, t-charts) to identify similarities and differences.
      • Identify a variety of ways of communicating (e.g., spoken language, facial expression, sign language, pictures, song, dance, drama).
      • Present information orally (e.g., show and tell, introduce their partner).
      • Create pictures to present information (e.g., a picture of their immediate environment, such as their classroom or a room in their home).
  • Explain the significance of personal or local events, objects, people, or places:
    • Sample activity:
      • Give a presentation about a family story or heirloom.
    • Key questions:
      • What is meant by significance?
      • What makes something a personal or family treasure?
      • Which events, objects, people, and places are significant to you?
  • Ask questions, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and features of different types of sources:
    • Sample activities:
      • Identify interesting features in family photographs or other historical photographs.
      • Speculate on what an artifact was used for or how old it is.
    • Key question:
      • Who do you think used this artifact and why?
  • Sequence objects, images, or events, and distinguish between what has changed and what has stayed the same:
    • Sample activities:
      • Put significant personal and family milestones in order.
      • Place objects in chronological order based on visual cues (e.g., older and newer houses or cars).
      • Use appropriate terms to describe when events took place (e.g., then, now, long ago).
    • Key questions:
      • How was life different when your parents or grandparents were your age?
      • How has your family changed over time?
  • Recognize causes and consequences of events, decisions, or developments in their lives:
    • Key questions:
      • How did a particular event make a difference in your life?
      • What were the challenges or benefits of a particular event in your life?
  • Acknowledge different perspectives on people, places, issues, or events in their lives:
    • Sample activity:
      • Compare how friends or members of your family feel about selected people, places, issues, and events.
    • Key questions:
      • Why do different people have different perspectives on issues?
      • If two people have different perspectives or opinions, does it mean that one person is right and the other is wrong? Explain your answer.
Concepts and Content: 
  • ways in which individuals and families differ and are the same
  • personal and family history and traditions
  • needs and wants of individuals and families
  • rights, roles, and responsibilities of individuals and groups
  • people, places, and events in the local community, and in local First Peoples communities
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • ways in which individuals and families differ and are the same:
    • Sample topics:
      • similarities and differences could include physical characteristics (e.g., hair, skin colour, eyes), cultural characteristics (e.g., language, family origins, food and dress), and other characteristics (e.g., preferred activities, favourite books and movies, pets, neighbourhood)
      • different types of families (nuclear, extended, step-families, adoptive and biological, same-sex, single-parent, etc.)
      • comparison of families in the past and present (e.g., families in your grandparents’ time compared with present-day families)
    • Key questions:
      • What is the definition of a family and an individual?
      • What types of roles and responsibilities exist in families?
  • personal and family history and traditions:
    • Sample topics:
      • important events in your life (e.g., starting school, losing a tooth, accepting a new baby, getting a new job, pet, or house)
      • family stories (e.g., immigration to Canada, First Peoples oral histories, notable ancestors, memories from older relatives)
      • traditions and celebrations (e.g., Christmas, other winter festivals around the world), special cultural holidays (e.g., Lunar New Year, Diwali, First Peoples celebrations, birthdays, and associated foods, clothing, art)
    • Key questions:
      • What types of stories get passed down from generation to generation?
      • Why do people find traditions and celebrations important?
  • needs and wants of individuals and families:
    • Sample topics:
      • needs (e.g., water, food, clothing, love and acceptance, safety, education, shelter)
      • wants (toys, entertainment, luxuries, eating out at a restaurant)
      • work that people do in their family and community to meet their needs and wants 
    • Key questions:
      • What is the difference between a need and a want? (e.g., people need food to live but ordering pizza is a want)
      • Do people agree on what are needs and what are wants?
  • rights, roles, and responsibilities of individuals and groups:
    • Sample topics:
      • rights (e.g., legal rights, UN Convention on the Rights of the Child) 
      • roles (e.g., roles within a family or on a sports team; roles as a friend, peer, student)
      • responsibilities to self, others, and the environment
    • Key questions:
      • Do your rights, roles, and responsibilities change between home and school?
      • Who makes decisions about what happens at home or school?
  • people, places, and events in the local community, and in local First Peoples communities:
    • Sample topics:
      • people (e.g., political leaders like the mayor or band council, school officials, local businesspeople) 
      • places (e.g., school, neighbourhoods, stores, parks, recreation facilities)
      • events (e.g., new buildings, seasonal changes, sports)
      • natural and human-built characteristics of the local physical environment
    • Key question:
      • What people, places, or events are most significant to you? Is your list the same as your classmates or family?
  
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Nos communautés sont diverses, mais sont composées d’individus qui ont beaucoup en commun.
Les histoires et les traditions sont le reflet de la nature et de l’origine des individus et des familles.
Les droits, les rôles et les responsabilités façonnent notre identité et nous aident à établir de saines relations avec les autres.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions
  • Expliquer l’importance de lieux, de personnes, d’objets ou d’événements d’envergure locale ou personnelle (portée)
  • Poser des questions, faire des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et les caractéristiques de différents types de sources d’information (preuves)
  • Ordonner des objets, des images ou des événements, et faire la distinction entre ce qui a changé et ce qui n’a pas changé (continuité et changement)
  • Reconnaître les causes et les conséquences d’un événement, d’une décision ou d’un changement dans sa vie personnelle (causes et conséquences)
  • Reconnaître qu’il peut y avoir plusieurs points de vue concernant des personnes, des lieux, des enjeux ou des événements dans leur vie (perspective)
  • Relever ce qui est juste ou injuste concernant un événement, une décision ou une action dans leur vie, et envisager des plans d’action appropriés (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions:
    • Compétences clés :
      • accéder à des sources d’information audio, visuelles, matérielles ou imprimées
      • tirer de l’information de ses expériences personnelles, de source orale  et de représentations visuelles
      • participer à une collecte d’information sur un sujet en classe
      • avec l’aide de l’enseignant, utiliser des repères graphiques simples (p. ex. diagramme de Venn, tableau en T) pour relever des ressemblances et des différences
      • relever divers modes de communication (p. ex. langage parlé, expression faciale, langage des signes, image, chant, danse, art dramatique)
      • présenter oralement de l’information (p. ex. exposé oral, présentation d’un autre élève)
      • représenter l’information par des images (p. ex. une image de son environnement immédiat, comme sa classe ou une pièce de sa maison)
  • Expliquer l’importance de lieux, de personnes, d’objets ou d’événements d’envergure locale ou personnelle:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • donner une présentation sur une histoire ou un objet de famille 
    • Questions clés :
      • Que signifie la portée?
      • Qu’est-ce qui fait qu’une chose devient importante pour une personne ou une famille?
      • Quels événements, objets, personnes et lieux sont importants pour toi?
  • Poser des questions, faire des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et les caractéristiques de différents types de sources:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • relever les détails intéressants d’une photo de famille ou d’une photo historique
      • spéculer sur l’utilisation ou l’âge d’un artéfact
    • Question clé :
      • Selon toi, qui utilisait cet artéfact, et à quoi servait-il?
  • Ordonner des objets, des images ou des événements, et faire la distinction entre les choses qui ont changé et les choses qui n’ont pas changé:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • ordonner des jalons importants de l’histoire familiale ou personnelle
      • placer par ordre chronologique des objets à l’aide d’indice visuels (p. ex. des maisons ou des voitures anciennes et modernes)
      • utiliser les termes appropriés pour situer des événements dans le temps (p. ex. à l’époque, aujourd’hui, il y a longtemps)
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment compares-tu ta vie à celle de tes parents ou de tes grands-parents quand ils étaient enfants?
      • Comment ta famille a-t-elle changé au cours du temps?
  • Reconnaître les causes et les conséquences d’un événement, d’une décision ou d’un développement dans sa vie personnelle:
    • Questions clés :
      • Peux-tu décrire un événement marquant dans ta vie? Comment a-t-il marqué ta vie?
      • Quels en étaient les bons ou les mauvais côtés?
  • Reconnaître qu’il peut y avoir plusieurs points de vue concernant des personnes, des lieux, des enjeux ou des événements dans sa vie:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • comparer les sentiments d’amis ou de membres de la famille à l’égard d’une personne, d’un endroit, d’un sujet ou d’un événement
    • Questions clés :
      • Pourquoi différentes personnes ont-elles des points de vue différents concernant tel ou tel sujet?
      • Si deux personnes n’ont pas le même point de vue ou la même opinion sur un sujet, est-ce que cela veut nécessairement dire que l’une a raison et l’autre tort? Explique ta réponse.
content_fr: 
  • Les différences et les ressemblances entre les individus et les familles
  • L’histoire et les traditions personnelles et familiales
  • Les besoins et les désirs des individus et des familles
  • Les droits, rôles et responsabilités des individus et des groupes
  • Les personnes, lieux et événements dans la communauté et dans les communautés autochtones locales
content elaborations fr: 
  • Les différences et les ressemblances entre les individus et les familles:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les ressemblances et les différences : les caractères physiques (p. ex. couleur des cheveux, de la peau et des yeux), les traits culturels (p. ex. langue, origines familiales, cuisine et vêtements) ou d’autres caractéristiques (p. ex. activités favorites, livres et films préférés, animaux domestiques, quartier)
      • les différents types de familles (nucléaire, élargie, reconstituée, adoptive, biologique, homoparentale, monoparentale, etc.)
      • comparer les familles d’autrefois et d’aujourd’hui (p. ex. comparer la famille de ses grands-parents à la sienne)
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelle est la définition d’une famille et d’un individu?
      • Quels types de rôle et de responsabilités trouve-t-on dans une famille?
  • L’histoire et les traditions personnelles et familiales:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les événements marquants dans la vie de l’élève (commencer l’école; perdre une dent; accueillir un petit frère ou une petite sœur; un parent qui change d’emploi, un nouvel animal domestique ou une nouvelle maison)
      • les histoires familiales (p. ex. l’immigration au Canada, les histoires orales des peuples autochtones, les ancêtres remarquables, les souvenirs de parents âgés)
      • les traditions et les célébrations (p. ex. Noël, autres célébrations hivernales de par le monde), fêtes spéciales d’autres cultures (p. ex. Nouvel An lunaire, Diwali, célébrations des peuples autochtones, anniversaires), ainsi que les mets, les vêtements et les arts qui y sont associés
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels genres d’histoires se transmettent de génération en génération?
      • Pourquoi les gens croient-ils que les traditions et les célébrations sont importantes?
  • Les besoins et les désirs des individus et des familles:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les besoins (p. ex. eau, nourriture, vêtements, amour et acceptation, sécurité, éducation, abri)
      • les désirs (p. ex. jouets, divertissement, produits de luxe, repas au restaurant)
      • le travail des individus, au sein de leur famille et de leur communauté, pour répondre à leurs besoins et à leurs désirs
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelle est la différence entre un besoin et un désir? (p. ex. la nourriture est un besoin essentiel pour vivre, mais vouloir commander une pizza est un désir)
      • Les gens sont-ils d’accord sur ce qui est un besoin et ce qui est un désir?
  • Les droits, rôles et responsabilités des individus et des groupes:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les droits (p. ex. droits reconnus par la loi, Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant des Nations Unies)
      • les rôles (p. ex. rôles au sein de la famille ou d’une équipe sportive; rôles d’ami, de pair, d’élève)
      • les responsabilités envers soi-même, les autres et l’environnement
    • Questions clés :
      • Tes droits, rôles et responsabilités sont-ils différents à la maison et à l’école?
      • Qui prend les décisions sur ce qui se passe à la maison ou à l’école?
  • Les personnes, lieux et événements dans la communauté et dans les communautés autochtones locales:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les personnes (p. ex. dirigeants politiques comme le maire ou le conseil de bande, autorités scolaires, gens d’affaires locaux)
      • les lieux (p. ex. école, quartier, magasin, parc, installations récréatives)
      • les événements (p. ex. nouveau bâtiment, changements saisonniers, sports)
      • les caractéristiques naturelles et d’origine humaine de l’environnement local
    • Question clé :
      • Quelles personnes, quels lieux ou quels événements sont les plus importants pour toi? Ta liste est-elle pareille à celle des autre élèves ou des membres de ta famille?
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes