Curriculum Social Studies Grade 2

Subject: 
Social Studies
Grade: 
Grade 2
Big Ideas: 
Local actions have global consequences, and global actions have local consequences.
Canada is made up of many diverse regions and communities.
Individuals have rights and responsibilities as global citizens.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Explain why people, events, or places are significant to various individuals and groups (significance)
  • Ask questions, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and features of different types of sources (evidence)
  • Sequence objects, images, and events, or explain why some aspects change and others stay the same (continuity and change)
  • Recognize the causes and consequences of events, decisions, or developments (cause and consequence)
  • Explain why people’s beliefs, values, worldviews, experiences, and roles give them different perspectives on people, places, issues, or events (perspective)
  • Make value judgments about events, decisions, or actions, and suggest lessons that can be learned (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Use cardinal directions to identify relative locations on simple maps (e.g., the school is north of the park)
      • Interpret symbols and legends on maps to identify given locations in the community (e.g., schools, roads, railways, playgrounds, museums)
      • Create simple maps of familiar locations (e.g., the school and grounds)
      • Use simple graphic organizers (e.g., charts, webs) to record relevant information from selected sources
      • Draw simple interpretations from personal experiences, oral sources, and visual and written representations
      • Use selected communication forms (e.g., presentation software, models, maps, oral, written) to accomplish given presentation tasks
      • Ask relevant questions to clarify a classroom or school problem
      • Brainstorm and compare a variety of responses to a given classroom or school problem
      • Describe ways to choose a response to a problem (e.g., voting or majority rule, consensus, authority rule)
      • Predict the possible results of various solutions to a problem
      • Demonstrate willingness to consider diverse points of view
  • Explain why people, events, or places are significant to various individuals and groups:
    • Sample activity:
      • Identify significant people and places in BC, Canada, and the world.
    • Key questions:
      • Why do people have different opinions on what people, events, and places are more significant than others?
      • Are there people, events, and places that everyone thinks are significant? Explain why or why not.
  • Ask questions, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and features of different types of sources:
    • Sample activities:
      • Conduct research (e.g., interview an Elder, visit a museum) to identify changes that have occurred in your community
      • Examine photographs from a variety of communities and identify similarities and differences
  • Sequence objects, images, and events, or explain why some aspects change and others stay the same:
    • Sample activities:
      • Create a timeline of key events in your region
      • Make simple predictions about how communities might change in the future
      • Conduct research (e.g., interview an Elder, visit a museum) to identify changes that have occurred in your community
      • Give examples of traditions and practices that have endured over time in the communities you have studied
    • Key questions:
      • How has Canada changed over time?
      • How have people’s needs and wants changed over time?
      • What needs and wants have changed and which have stayed the same?
  • Recognize the causes and consequences of events, decisions, or developments:
    • Key questions:
      • What would happen if people did not take care of their local environment?
      • What would happen if there was nobody leading a community or country?
  • Explain why people’s beliefs, values, worldviews, experiences, and roles give them different perspectives on people, places, issues, or events:
    • Sample activities:
      • Give examples of issues on which there are differing points of view
      • Give examples of diverse perspectives on meeting your community’s needs and wants
    • Key questions:
      • Does everyone agree on the importance of conservation?
      • Who should make decisions about the future of the community and country?
  • Make value judgments about events, decisions, or actions, and suggest lessons that can be learned:
    • Sample activity:
      • Distinguish between factual statements and value and opinion statements
    • Key questions:
      • What should be done about the distribution of natural resources?
      • Should more wealthy countries help out less prosperous countries?
Concepts and Content: 
  • diverse characteristics of communities and cultures in Canada and around the world, including at least one Canadian First Peoples community and culture
  • how people’s needs and wants are met in communities
  • relationships between people and the environment in different communities
  • diverse features of the environment in other parts of Canada and the world
  • rights and responsibilities of individuals regionally and globally
  • roles and responsibilities of regional governments
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • diverse characteristics of communities and cultures in Canada and around the world, including at least one Canadian First Peoples community and culture:
    • Sample topics:
      • daily life in different communities (e.g., work, housing, use of the land, education, access to public services and utilities, transportation)
      • key cultural aspects (e.g., language, traditions, arts, food)
      • cultural diversity within your community
    • Key question:
      • What does community mean to you?
  • how people’s needs and wants are met in communities:
    • Sample topics:
      • how people acquire goods and services (e.g., by buying or renting, or through public funding)
      • needs and wants in different communities: different needs and wants depending on the climate; different goods and services depending on the size of the community (i.e., small versus large)
      • differences between psychological and physical needs and wants  
    • Key questions:
      • How do the local environment and culture affect the goods and services available in your community?
      • How do different communities help people who can’t meet their basic needs?
  • relationships between people and the environment in different communities:
    • Sample topics:
      • impact of different economic activities and ways of life on the environment
      • impact on the environment by small and large communities
      • impact of recreational activities on the environment
      • community values regarding conservation and protection of the environment
    • Key question:
      • What types of environmental challenges do people face in different communities (e.g., natural disasters, climate change, lack of natural resources)?
  • diverse features of the environment in other parts of Canada and the world:
    • Sample topics:
      • climate zones
      • landforms
      • bodies of water
      • plants and animals
  • rights and responsibilities of individuals regionally and globally:
    • Sample topics:
      • responsibility to the environment
      • human rights
      • connections between your community and communities throughout Canada and around the world
  • roles and responsibilities of regional governments:
    • Sample topics:
      • examples of leaders in your community (e.g., mayor, town councillors, chief, Elders, community volunteers) and the places where they meet
      • services such as transportation, policing, firefighting, bylaw enforcement
    • Key questions:
      • How are decisions made in your region?
      • Should everyone be responsible for helping others in their community?
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les actions locales ont des répercussions au niveau mondial, et les actions mondiales ont des répercussions au niveau local.
Le Canada est composé de nombreuses régions et communautés diverses.
Les individus, à titre de citoyens du monde, ont des droits et des responsabilités.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions
  • Expliquer pourquoi les personnes, les événements ou les lieux sont importants pour divers groupes et individus (portée)
  • Poser des questions, faire des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et les caractéristiques de différents types de sources (preuves)
  • Ordonner des objets, des images et des événements, et expliquer pourquoi certains aspects ont changé alors que d’autres n’ont pas changé (continuité et changement)
  • Reconnaître les causes et les conséquences des événements, des décisions ou des développements (causes et conséquences)
  • Expliquer pourquoi les croyances, les valeurs, la vision du monde, les expériences et les rôles ont une incidence sur la perception des personnes, des lieux, des enjeux ou des événements (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements de valeur sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions, et suggérer des leçons à retenir (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions:
    • Compétences clés :
      • se servir des points cardinaux pour localiser un lieu par rapport à un autre sur une carte simple (p. ex. l’école se trouve au nord du parc)
      • interpréter les symboles et les légendes d’une carte pour identifier des lieux dans la communauté (p. ex. école, route, voie ferrée, terrain de jeu, musée)
      • créer une carte simple représentant un lieu familier (p. ex. l’école et son terrain)
      • se servir de repères graphiques simples (p. ex. tableau, schéma conceptuel) pour consigner l’information pertinente d’une source choisie
      • utiliser une forme de communication (p. ex. logiciel de présentation, modèle, carte, présentation orale, texte) pour accomplir une tâche de présentation donnée
      • poser des questions pertinentes pour clarifier un problème touchant la classe ou l’école
      • faire un remue-méninges pour proposer des solutions à un problème touchant la classe ou l’école, puis comparer ces solutions
      • prédire les résultats de différentes solutions à un problème
  • Expliquer pourquoi les personnes, les événements ou les lieux sont importants pour divers groupes et individus:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • identifier des personnes et des lieux importants en Colombie-Britannique, au Canada et ailleurs dans le monde
    • Questions clés :
      • Pourquoi les personnes, les événements et les lieux n’ont-ils pas la même importance pour tout le monde?
      • Y a-t-il des personnes, des événements et des lieux qui sont importants pour tout le monde? Justifier la réponse.
  • Poser des questions, faire des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et les caractéristiques de différents types de sources:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • faire des recherches (p. ex. entrevue d’un Aîné, visite au musée) pour relever des changements qui sont survenus dans sa communauté
      • examiner des photographies de différentes communautés, et y relever des ressemblances et des différences
  • Ordonner des objets, des images ou des événements, et expliquer pourquoi certains aspects ont changé alors que d’autres n’ont pas changé:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • placer les événements clés de sa région sur un schéma chronologique
      • faire des prédictions simples sur l’évolution des communautés
      • faire des recherches (p. ex. entrevue d’un Aîné, visite au musée) pour relever des changements qui sont survenus dans sa communauté
      • donner des exemples de traditions et de pratiques qui ont perduré dans les communautés étudiées
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment le Canada a-t-il changé au cours du temps?
      • Comment les besoins et les aspirations des individus ont-ils changé avec le temps?
      • Quels besoins et aspirations ont changé? Lesquels n’ont pas changé?
  • Reconnaître les causes et les conséquences des événements, des décisions ou des développements:
    • Questions clés :
      • Qu’arriverait-il si les gens ne prenaient pas soin de leur environnement immédiat?
      • Qu’arriverait-il s’il n’y avait personne pour diriger une communauté ou un pays?
  • Expliquer pourquoi les croyances, les valeurs, la vision du monde, les expériences et les rôles ont une incidence sur la perception des personnes, des lieux, des enjeux ou des événements:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • donner des exemples de questions sur lesquelles les points de vue divergent
      • donner des exemples de points de vue divergents sur la manière de répondre aux besoins et aux aspirations de sa communauté
    • Questions clés :
      • Est-ce que tout le monde accorde la même importance à la conservation?
      • Qui devrait prendre les décisions sur l’avenir de la communauté et du pays?
  • Porter des jugements de valeur sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions, et suggérer des leçons à retenir:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • faire la distinction entre un énoncé factuel et un jugement de valeur ou une opinion
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment devrait-on répartir les ressources naturelles?
      • Les pays riches devraient-ils aider les pays pauvres?
content_fr: 
  • Les diverses caractéristiques des communautés et des cultures du Canada et du monde entier, incluant au moins une communauté et culture autochtone du Canada
  • Les façons de répondre aux besoins et aux aspirations des individus dans les communautés
  • Les relations entre les individus et l’environnement dans différentes communautés
  • La diversité des caractéristiques de l’environnement dans d’autres régions du Canada et dans le monde
  • Les droits et responsabilités des individus à l’échelle régionale et à l’échelle mondiale
  • Les rôles et responsabilités des gouvernements régionaux
content elaborations fr: 
  • Les diverses caractéristiques des communautés et des cultures du Canada et du monde entier, incluant au moins une communauté et une culture autochtone du Canada:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • la vie quotidienne dans différentes communautés (p. ex. travail, logement, utilisation des terres, éducation, accès aux installations et aux services publics, transports)
      • les principaux traits culturels (p. ex. langue, traditions, arts, cuisine)
      • la diversité culturelle dans ta communauté
    • Question clé :
      • Pour toi, qu’est-ce qu’une communauté?
  • Les façons de répondre aux besoins et aux aspirations des individus dans les communautés:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • comment les personnes acquièrent-elles des biens et des services (p. ex. achat ou location, fonds publics)
      • les besoins et les aspirations dans différentes communautés : les besoins et les aspirations varient selon le climat; les biens et les services varient selon la taille de la communauté
      • la différence entre les besoins et les aspirations psychologiques et matériels  
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment l’environnement influe-t-il sur les biens et les services disponibles dans ta communauté?
      • Comment différentes communautés font-elles pour aider les personnes qui n’arrivent pas à combler leurs besoins essentiels?
  • Les relations entre les individus et l’environnement dans différentes communautés:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les répercussions sur l’environnement de différentes activités économiques et de différents modes de vie
      • les répercussions sur l’environnement des petites et des grandes communautés
      • les répercussions sur l’environnement des activités récréatives
      • les valeurs de sa communauté au sujet de la conservation et de la protection de l’environnement
    • Question clé :
      • À quels types de problèmes environnementaux telle ou telle communauté est-elle confrontée (p. ex. catastrophes naturelles, changements climatiques, manque de ressources naturelles)?
  • La diversité des caractéristiques de l’environnement dans d’autres régions du Canada et dans le monde:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • zones climatiques
      • reliefs
      • plans d’eau
      • plantes et animaux
  • Les droits et responsabilités des individus à l’échelle régionale et à l’échelle mondiale:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • la responsabilité à l’égard de l’environnement
      • les droits de la personne
      • les liens entre sa communauté et d’autres communautés du Canada et du monde
  • Les rôles et responsabilités des gouvernements régionaux:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les leaders de sa communauté (p. ex. maire, conseiller municipal, chef, Aînés, bénévoles), et leurs lieux de rencontre
      • les services, comme les transports, la police, les pompiers, les autorités d’application des règlements municipaux
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment les décisions sont-elles prises dans ta région?
      • Est-ce que tout le monde devrait être responsable d’aider les autres dans sa communauté?
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes