Curriculum Social Studies Grade 7

Subject: 
Social Studies
Grade: 
Grade 7
Big Ideas: 
Geographic conditions shaped the emergence of civilizations.
Religious and cultural practices that emerged during this period have endured and continue to influence people.
Increasingly complex societies required new systems of laws and government.
Economic specialization and trade networks can lead to conflict and cooperation between societies.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to — ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments at particular times and places (significance)
  • Identify what the creators of accounts, narratives, maps, or texts have determined is significant (significance)
  • Assess the credibility of multiple sources and the adequacy of evidence used to justify conclusions (evidence)
  • Characterize different time periods in history, including periods of progress and decline, and identify key turning points that marked periods of change (continuity and change)
  • Determine which causes most influenced particular decisions, actions, or events, and assess their short- and long-term consequences (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events, and compare the values, worldviews, and beliefs of human cultures and societies in different times and places (perspective)
  • Make ethical judgments about past events, decisions, or actions, and assess the limitations of drawing direct lessons from the past (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to — ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Select a relevant problem or issue for inquiry.
      • Use comparison, classification, inference, imagination, verification, and analogy to clarify and define a problem or issue.
      • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of various graphic forms of communication (e.g., graphs, tables, charts, maps, photographs, sketches).
      • Demonstrate an ability to interpret scales and legends in graphs, tables, and maps (e.g., climograph, topographical map, pie chart).
      • Compare maps of early civilizations with modern maps of the same area.
      • Select an appropriate graphic form of communication for a specific purpose (e.g., a timeline to show a sequence of events, a map to show location).
      • Represent information fairly and cite sources consistently.
      • Select appropriate forms of presentation suitable for the purpose and audience (e.g., multimedia, oral presentation, song, dramatic performance, written presentation).
      • Demonstrate debating skills, including identifying, discussing, defining, and clarifying a problem, issue, or inquiry.
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments at particular times and places:
    • Sample activity:
      • Identify specific examples of influences and contributions from ancient cultures (e.g., writing system, number system, philosophy, education, religion
      • and spirituality, visual arts, drama, architecture, timekeeping) and assess their significance.
    • Key questions:
      • What is the most significant archeological finding that helps us understand the development of humans?
      • What are the most significant factors that contribute to the decline of an empire?
      • Why are philosophers from this era still significant today?
  • Assess the credibility of multiple sources and the adequacy of evidence used to justify conclusions:
    • Sample activities:
      • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of specific types of sources for specific purposes (e.g., primary and secondary sources; print, video, electronic, graphic sources; artifacts).
      • Compare information-gathering methodologies (e.g., primary research using surveys, archeological excavation, interviews; research using secondary sources; testing of hypotheses).
      • Apply criteria to evaluate information and information sources (e.g., assess bias, reliability, authorship, currency, audience; confirm value using multiple sources).
    • Key questions:
      • What can we learn from ancient civilizations based on the artifacts we have found?
      • How do artifacts and monuments reflect the surrounding geography?
  • Characterize different time periods in history, including periods of progress and decline, and identify key turning points that marked periods of change:
    • Key question:
      • What are different ways that you can categorize different periods in history?
  • Determine which causes most influenced particular decisions, actions, or events, and assess their short- and long-term consequences:
    • Sample activity:
      • Explain key factors in the spread of Christianity.
    • Key question:
      • What role does geography play in the location of civilizations?
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events, and compare the values, worldviews, and beliefs of human cultures and societies in different times and places:
    • Key questions:
      • What are the different attitudes toward death and the afterlife in religions and cultures?
      • How do historians’ views on the decline of the Roman Empire differ?
  • Make ethical judgments about past events, decisions, or actions, and assess the limitations of drawing direct lessons from the past:
    • Key questions:
      • How should we resolve competing claims of ownership over religious holy sites?
      • Was (Emperor Chin, Julius Caesar, or other person of significance) a tyrant or a great leader? Explain why or why not.
Concepts and Content: 
  • anthropological origins of humans
  • human responses to particular geographic challenges and opportunities, including climates, landforms, and natural resources
  • features and characteristics of civilizations and factors that lead to their rise and fall
  • origins, core beliefs, narratives, practices, and influences of religions, including at least one indigenous to the Americas
  • scientific, philosophical, and technological developments
  • interactions and exchanges between past civilizations and cultures, including conflict, peace, trade, expansion, and migration
  • social, political, legal, governmental, and economic systems and structures, including at least one indigenous to the Americas
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • anthropological origins of humans:
    • Sample topics:
      • early origins of humans in Africa and the migration of early humans out of Africa to the rest of the world
      • interactions between early humans and Neanderthals
      • technological developments of early humans and the increasingly sophisticated use of stone tools and early metalworking
      • the shift of early humans from a nomadic hunter-gatherer way of life to more settled agricultural communities
    • Key question:
      • What advantages did agriculture have over the hunter-gather way of life?
  • human responses to particular geographic challenges and opportunities, including climates, landforms, and natural resources:
    • Sample activities:
      • Identify the key characteristics of physical environments that affected the following for selected ancient cultures:
        • development and settlement (e.g., proximity to water, fertile land, natural resources, defensibility)
        • the fall of the culture (e.g., earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic activity, unsustainable human practices)
        • interactions among cultures (e.g., mountain ranges, oceans, rivers)
      • Describe how humans adapted to their physical environment in ancient civilizations (e.g., architecture, transportation methods, clothing)
      • Create maps to show the key physical environmental characteristics of a selected ancient culture
    • Key question:
      • What types of strategies have different civilizations used to respond to similar challenges imposed by the physical environment?
  • features and characteristics of civilizations and factors that lead to their rise and fall:
    • Sample topics:
      • components that are common to cultures around the world and throughout time (e.g., social organization, religion, traditions, celebrations, government, law, trade, communications, transportation, technology, fine arts, food, clothing, shelter, medicine, education)
      • elements of civilizations such as advanced technology, specialized workers, record keeping, complex institutions, major urban centres
  • origins, core beliefs, narratives, practices, and influences of religions, including at least one indigenous to the Americas:
    • Sample topic:
      • representations of the world according to the religions, spiritual beliefs, myths, stories, knowledge, and languages of past civilizations and cultures
  • scientific, philosophical, and technological developments:
    • Sample activities:
      • Cite specific examples to explain the contributions of ancient cultures to the evolution of various fields of technology (e.g., astronomy, medicine, paper, sea travel, agriculture, ceramics)
      • Compare selected technologies from selected ancient cultures in terms of materials, purpose, and impact on society and daily life
  • interactions and exchanges between past civilizations and cultures, including conflict, peace, trade, expansion, and migration:
    • Sample topic:
      • inter-relationships and influences among selected ancient cultures (e.g., Egyptian adaptation of chariots from the Hyksos; Roman adaptation of Greek gods and mythology; adaptations of Sumerian writing system, Babylonian code of law, Sumerian irrigation system)
    • Key question:
      • What is the impact on language of increased trade and interactions between civilizations and cultures?
  • social, political, legal, governmental, and economic systems and structures, including at least one indigenous to the Americas:
    • Sample activities:
      • List and describe aspects of current Canadian laws and government structures that have evolved from ancient civilizations (e.g., rule of law, democracy, senate, representation)
      • Describe examples of individual rights in ancient civilizations and compare them to individual rights in current Canadian society
      • Compare various social roles within a selected ancient culture in terms of daily life and how people met their basic needs (e.g., work, family structures, gender roles, class systems)
      • Create a chart or other representation to illustrate the economic and social hierarchy of roles and classes in a selected ancient culture (e.g., slaves, farmers, builders, merchants, artisans, scribes, teachers, priests, rulers)
      • List goods and services that people in ancient civilizations used in trade (e.g., items needed for survival and comfort, goods and services that could be offered for trade)
      • Explain how and why monetary systems evolved from bartering
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
La géographie a façonné l’émergence des civilisations.
Les pratiques religieuses et culturelles qui ont émergé à cette époque ont perduré et exercent encore aujourd’hui leur influence sur les gens.
De nouveaux systèmes de lois et de gouvernement se sont développés pour répondre aux besoins de sociétés de plus en plus complexes.
La spécialisation économique et les réseaux commerciaux peuvent donner lieu à des conflits et à des collaborations entre les sociétés.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions
  • Évaluer l’importance de personnes, d’événements ou de développements à une époque et dans un lieu donné (portée)
  • Relever ce que les auteurs de compte rendus, de récits, de cartes ou de textes ont considéré comme important (portée)
  • Évaluer la crédibilité de multiples sources et le bien-fondé des preuves utilisées pour tirer des conclusions (preuves)
  • Caractériser différentes époques de l’histoire, y compris les périodes de progrès et de déclin, et relever les moments décisifs qui ont marqué le début de périodes de changement (continuité et changement)
  • Déterminer quelles causes ont le plus influé sur des décisions, des actions ou des événements, et évaluer leurs conséquences à court et à long terme (causes et conséquences)
  • Expliquer les différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d’enjeux ou d’événements du passé ou du présent, et comparer les valeurs, la vision du monde et les croyances de cultures et de sociétés d’une variété d’époques et de lieux (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions passés, et évaluer les limites d’une application directe des leçons tirées du passé (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions:
    • Compétences clés :
      • choisir un problème ou une question à investiguer
      • faire appel à la comparaison, à la classification, à l’inférence, à l’imagination, à la vérification et à l’analogie pour définir et clarifier un problème ou une question
      • comparer les avantages et les inconvénients de diverses formes de communication graphique (p. ex. graphique, table, tableau, carte, photographie, dessin)
      • faire état d’une capacité d’interpréter l’échelle et la légende d’un graphique, d’une table et d’une carte (p. ex. climagramme, carte topographique, diagramme circulaire)
      • comparer des cartes de civilisations anciennes et des cartes modernes de la même région
      • choisir une forme de communication graphique adaptée au but recherché (p. ex. un schéma chronologique pour montrer une suite d’événements, une carte pour localiser un lieu)
      • représenter l’information avec justesse et citer systématiquement ses sources
      • choisir une forme de présentation adaptée au but recherché et au public visé (p. ex. multimédia, exposé oral, chanson, pièce de théâtre, présentation écrite)
      • faire état de ses compétences en débat, notamment la capacité de reconnaître, de discuter, de définir et de clarifier un problème, une question ou une interrogation
  • Évaluer l’importance de personnes, d’événements ou de développements à une époque et dans un lieu donné:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • relever des exemples d’influence et de contributions de cultures anciennes (p. ex. système d’écriture, système de numération, philosophie, éducation, religion et spiritualité, arts visuels, art dramatique, architecture, mesure du temps) et évaluer leur importance
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelle est la découverte archéologique qui a le plus contribué à notre compréhension du développement humain?
      • Quels sont les principaux facteurs qui mènent au déclin d’un empire?
      • Pourquoi les philosophes de cette époque sont-ils toujours d’actualité aujourd’hui?
  • Évaluer la crédibilité de multiples sources et le bien-fondé des preuves utilisées pour tirer des conclusions:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • comparer les avantages et les inconvénients de différentes sources pour tel ou tel objectif (p. ex. sources primaires et secondaires; documents écrits, vidéo, électroniques ou graphiques; artéfacts)
      • comparer les méthodes de collecte d’information (p. ex. recherche dans les sources primaires par sondage, excavation archéologique ou entrevue; recherche dans les sources secondaires; test d’hypothèses)
      • appliquer des critères pour évaluer l’information et les sources d’information (p. ex. évaluer le préjugé, la fiabilité, l’auteur, l’actualité, le public; vérifier la valeur de l’information en comparant des sources multiples)
    • Questions clés :
      • Qu’est-ce que les artéfacts découverts nous ont appris sur les civilisations anciennes?
      • En quoi les artéfacts et les monuments sont-ils un reflet de la géographie environnante?
  • Caractériser différentes époques de l’histoire, y compris les périodes de progrès et de déclin, et relever les moments décisifs qui ont marqué le début de périodes de changement:
    • Question clé :
      • Imagine plusieurs manières de catégoriser les différentes périodes de l’histoire. 
  • Déterminer les causes ayant le plus influé sur des décisions, des actions ou des événements, et évaluer leurs conséquences à court et à long terme:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • expliquer les principaux facteurs qui expliquent la propagation du christianisme
    • Question clé :
      • Quel rôle joue la géographie dans le choix du lieu où vont s’épanouir les civilisations?
  • Expliquer les différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d’enjeux ou d’événements du passé ou du présent, et comparer les valeurs, la vision du monde et les croyances de cultures et de sociétés d’une variété d’époques et de lieux:
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles sont les attitudes envers la mort et la vie après la mort dans différentes religions et cultures?
      • Comment les historiens interprètent-ils le déclin de l’Empire romain? Y a-t-il des divergences d’interprétation?
  • Porter des jugements éthiques sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions passés, et évaluer les limites d’une application directe des leçons tirées du passé:
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment devrait-on résoudre les revendications conflictuelles sur la propriété des lieux saints?
      • L’empereur Qin, Jules César ou tout autre personnage historique important était-il un tyran ou un grand chef d’État? Justifier la réponse.
content_fr: 
  • Les origines de l’être humain du point de vue de l’anthropologie
  • Les réactions de l’humain face à des défis et à des possibilités découlant de la géographie, y compris le climat, le relief et les ressources naturelles
  • Les caractéristiques des civilisations et les facteurs ayant conduit à leur expansion et à leur déclin
  • Les origines, croyances fondamentales, récits, pratiques et influences des religions, incluant au moins une civilisation autochtone des Amériques
  • Les développements scientifiques, philosophiques et technologiques
  • Les interactions et les échanges entre les civilisations et les cultures anciennes, y compris les conflits, la paix, le commerce, les expansions et les migrations
  • Les structures et les systèmes sociaux, politiques, juridiques, gouvernementaux et économiques, incluant au moins une civilisation autochtone des Amériques
content elaborations fr: 
  • Les origines de l’être humain du point de vue de l’anthropologie:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les origines lointaines des humains en Afrique et la migration des humains primitifs hors d’Afrique et dans le reste du monde
      • les interactions entre les humains primitifs et les Néanderthaliens
      • les développements technologiques des humains primitifs, l’utilisation d’outils de pierre de plus en plus complexes et les débuts du travail du métal
      • le passage graduel du nomadisme des chasseurs-cueilleurs à la sédentarité des communautés agricoles
    • Question clé :
      • Quels étaient les avantages de l’agriculture par rapport au mode de vie des chasseurs-cueilleurs?
  • Les réactions de l’humain face à des défis et à des possibilités découlant de la géographie, y compris le climat, le relief et les ressources naturelles:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • relever les caractéristiques clés de l’environnement physique qui ont influé sur les aspects suivants de certaines cultures anciennes :
        • le développement et le peuplement (p. ex. proximité de l’eau, terre fertile, ressources naturelles, protection)
        • le déclin de la culture (p. ex. séisme, tsunami, activité volcanique, pratiques humaines non durables)
        • les interactions entre les cultures (p. ex. chaînes de montagnes, océans, cours d’eau)
      • décrire comment les humains se sont adaptés à leur environnement physique dans les civilisations anciennes (p. ex. architecture, moyens de transport, vêtement)
      • créer des cartes pour montrer les caractéristiques clés de l’environnement d’une culture ancienne choisie
    • Question clé :
      • Quelles stratégies différentes civilisations ont-elles employées pour surmonter des difficultés semblables imposées par leur environnement physique?
  • Les caractéristiques des civilisations et les facteurs ayant conduit à leur expansion et à leur déclin:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les éléments communs à toutes les cultures du monde et à toutes les époques (p. ex. organisation sociale, religion, traditions, célébrations, gouvernement, droit, commerce, communications, transports, technologie, beaux-arts, cuisine, vêtement, habitation, médecine, éducation)
      • les éléments d’une civilisation, comme la technologie de pointe, la spécialisation du travail, l’archivage, les institutions complexes, les grands centres urbains
  • Les origines, croyances fondamentales, récits, pratiques et influences des religions, incluant au moins une civilisation autochtone des Amériques:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les représentations du monde selon les religions, les croyances, les mythes, les contes, les connaissances et la langue de civilisations et de cultures anciennes
  • Les développements scientifiques, philosophiques et technologiques:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • expliquer, à l’aide d’exemples, les contributions de cultures anciennes à l’évolution de divers domaines technologiques (p. ex. astronomie, médecine, papier, navigation maritime, agriculture, poterie)
      • comparer la technologie de différentes cultures anciennes en termes de matériaux, de fonction et de répercussions sur la société et la vie quotidienne
  • Les interactions et les échanges entre les civilisations et les cultures anciennes, y compris les conflits, la paix, le commerce, les expansions et les migrations:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les relations entre différentes cultures anciennes et l’influence qu’elles ont exercé les unes sur les autres (p. ex. adaptation du chariot des Hyksôs par les Égyptiens; adaptation des dieux et de la mythologie grecs par les Romains; adaptations du système d’écriture sumérien, du code des lois babylonien, du système d’irrigation sumérien)
    • Question clé :
      • Quelles ont été les répercussions de la langue sur l’expansion du commerce et l’augmentation des interactions entre les civilisations et les cultures?
  • Les structures et les systèmes sociaux, politiques, juridiques, gouvernementaux et économiques, incluant au moins une civilisation autochtone des Amériques:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • énumérer et décrire des aspects des lois et des structures de gouvernement du Canada moderne qui découlent de civilisations anciennes (p. ex. primauté du droit, démocratie, sénat, représentation)
      • donner des exemples de droits de la personne dans les civilisations anciennes et les comparer aux droits de la personne dans la société canadienne d’aujourd’hui
      • comparer divers rôles sociaux au sein d’une culture ancienne en termes de qualité de vie, et comparer comment les personnes comblaient leurs besoins essentiels (p. ex. travail, structures familiales, rôles des hommes et des femmes, systèmes de classes)
      • illustrer, au moyen d’un tableau ou d’une autre forme de représentation, la hiérarchie économique et sociale des rôles et des classes dans une culture ancienne (p. ex. esclaves, fermiers, constructeurs, marchands, artisans, scribes, enseignants, prêtres, dirigeants)
      • nommer des biens et services que les personnes utilisaient pour faire du commerce dans les civilisations anciennes (p. ex. biens nécessaires pour la survie ou le confort, biens et services pouvant être échangés)
      • expliquer pourquoi et comment les systèmes monétaires ont peu à peu remplacé le troc
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes