Curriculum Social Studies Grade 8

Subject: 
Social Studies
Grade: 
Grade 8
Big Ideas: 
Contacts and conflicts between peoples stimulated significant cultural, social, political change.
Human and environmental factors shape changes in population and living standards.
Exploration, expansion, and colonization had varying consequences for different groups.
Changing ideas about the world created tension between people wanting to adopt new ideas and those wanting to preserve established traditions.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments at particular times and places (significance)
  • Identify what the creators of accounts, narratives, maps, or texts have determined is significant (significance)
  • Assess the credibility of multiple sources and the adequacy of evidence used to justify conclusions (evidence)
  • Characterize different time periods in history, including periods of progress and decline, and identify key turning points that mark periods of change (continuity and change)
  • Determine which causes most influenced particular decisions, actions, or events, and assess their short-and long-term consequences (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events, and compare the values, worldviews, and beliefs of human cultures and societies in different times and places (perspective)
  • Make ethical judgments about past events, decisions, or actions, and assess the limitations of drawing direct lessons from the past (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Select a relevant problem or issue for inquiry.
      • Use comparison, classification, inference, imagination, verification, and analogy to clarify and define a problem or issue.
      • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of various graphic forms of communication (e.g., graphs, tables, charts, maps, photographs, sketches).
      • Demonstrate an ability to interpret scales and legends in graphs, tables, and maps (e.g., climograph, topographical map, pie chart).
      • Compare maps of early civilizations with modern maps of the same area.
      • Select an appropriate graphic form of communication for a specific purpose (e.g., a timeline to show a sequence of events, a map to show location).
      • Represent information fairly and cite sources consistently.
      • Select appropriate forms of presentation suitable for the purpose and audience (e.g., multimedia, oral presentation, song, dramatic performance, written presentation).
      • Demonstrate debating skills, including identifying, discussing, defining, and clarifying a problem, issue, or inquiry.
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments at particular times and places:
    • Key questions:
      • Which explorer had the greatest impact on the colonization of North America?
      • Should the printing press be considered a more important turning point in human history than the Internet? Explain why or why not.
  • Identify what the creators of accounts, narratives, maps, or texts have determined is significant:
    • Sample activity:
      • Create a timeline of key events during this period and rank which are the most significant.
    • Key question:
      • Which had more impact on the world: Indian Ocean trade or the Italian Renaissance?
  • Assess the credibility of multiple sources and the adequacy of evidence used to justify conclusions:
    • Sample activities:
      • Distinguish between primary and secondary sources.
      • Assess the accuracy of sources (e.g., consider when they were created, recognize ambiguity and vagueness, distinguish conclusions from supporting statements, analyze logic or consistency of conclusions in terms of evidence provided).
      • Identify biases that influence documents (e.g., articulate different points of view, such as a landholder’s or tenant’s, on topics or issues; identify authors’ motives and describe how that could affect their reliability as a source; determine whether sources reflect single or multiple points of view).
      • Locate and use relevant data.
      • Evaluate the value of literature from this period (e.g., Canterbury Tales, The Tale of Genji) as a historical record.
    • Key questions:
      • How did the changing understanding of geography and astronomy affect how people perceived the world and their place in it?
      • What do different systems of mapping and cartography indicate about the cultures from which they emerged?
      • Which sources of information from this period are the most reliable?
  • Characterize different time periods in history, including periods of progress and decline, and identify key turning points that mark periods of change:
    • Key questions:
      • In what ways did the Industrial Revolution transform societies?
      • Did the First Industrial Revolution in Britain result in an improvement in living standards for most people?
      • Which development produced greater change: the Second Industrial Revolution or the First Industrial Revolution?
      • How do the increasingly global networks of this period compare to present-day global networks?
  • Determine which causes most influenced particular decisions, actions, or events, and assess their short-and long-term consequences:
    • Sample activity:
      • Analyze whether an event was caused by underlying systemic factors (e.g., social unrest, economic decline) or by an unpredictable event (e.g., disease, natural disaster).
    • Key questions:
      • How did the Black Death cause the end of feudalism and the Middle Ages in Europe?
      • What would have been the impacts if the indigenous peoples of the Americas had been immune to smallpox and other diseases?
      • What kinds of negative consequences can result from a positive event, and what kinds of positive consequences can result from a negative event (e.g., the role of the Black Death in breaking down the feudal system; ethnic violence resulting from colonial independence)?
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events, and compare the values, worldviews, and beliefs of human cultures and societies in different times and places:
    • Sample activities:
      • Gather and evaluate sources that provide information about perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events during a particular period of history.
      • Compare the level of respect for the natural environment in different societies.
      • Compare the factors that influenced the spread of two different global religions
    • Key questions:
      • How did religious institutions respond to scientific, technological, philosophical, and cultural shifts?
      • Who had more influence and power in Europe during the Middle Ages: the state (i.e., monarchs) or the church?
      • Was religion the primary cause of the Crusades and religious wars?
  • Make ethical judgments about past events, decisions, or actions, and assess the limitations of drawing direct lessons from the past:
    • Key questions:
      • How are different groups represented in various cultural narratives?
      • What lessons can we learn from the loss of languages due to imperialism?
Concepts and Content: 
  • social, political, and economic systems and structures, including those of at least one indigenous civilization
  • scientific and technological innovations
  • philosophical and cultural shifts
  • interactions and exchanges of resources, ideas, arts, and culture between and among different civilizations
  • exploration, expansion, and colonization
  • changes in population and living standards
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • social, political, and economic systems and structures, including those of at least one indigenous civilization:
    • Sample topics:
      • feudal societal structures and rights (e.g., in Europe versus Japan)
      • Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe
      • diffusion of religions throughout the world
      • collapse of empires
      • labour management
      • gender relations
    • Key questions:
      • What was the status of women in various societies during this period of history?
      • How were political decisions made during this period of history?
      • How was wealth distributed in societies during this period?
  • scientific and technological innovations:
    • Sample topics:
      • Arab world, Ibn Battuta, Islamic Golden Age (e.g., the diffusion of arts and mathematics)
      • Zheng He and cartography
      • European (Portuguese, Spanish, British) navigation tools and locations
      • cartography and navigation
      • agriculture
    • Key questions:
      • How did technology benefit people during this period of history?
      • Where did key scientific and technological discoveries occur?
  • philosophical and cultural shifts:
    • Sample topics:
      • printing press
      • Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe
      • Enlightenment
      • literary and artistic shifts
  • interactions and exchanges of resources, ideas, arts, and culture between and among different civilizations:
    • Sample topics:
      • Silk Road, Indian Ocean Trade (e.g., the flourishing of arts, architecture, math, and Islam)
      • Crusades
      • cultural diffusion
      • linguistic changes
      • environmental effects
      • Columbian Exchange
      • imperialism
      • Renaissance
      • Mesoamerica
  • exploration, expansion, and colonization:
    • Sample topics:
      • contact and conflict
      • the Americas
      • state formation and collapse
  • changes in population and living standards:
    • Sample topics:
      • forced and unforced migration and movement of people
      • diseases and health
      • urbanization and the effect of expanding communities
      • environmental impact (e.g., resource and land use)
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les contacts et les conflits entre les peuples ont entraîné de profonds changements culturels, sociaux et politiques.
Des facteurs humains et environnementaux sont à l’origine de changements dans les populations et les conditions de vie.
L’exploration, l’expansion et la colonisation ont eu des conséquences différentes pour différents groupes.
De nouvelles perceptions du monde ont créé des tensions entre ceux qui souhaitaient les adopter et ceux qui voulaient demeurer fidèles à la tradition.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions
  • Évaluer l’importance de personnes, d’événements ou de développements à une époque et dans un lieu donné (portée)
  • Relever ce que les auteurs de compte rendus, de récits, de cartes ou de textes ont considéré comme important (portée)
  • Évaluer la crédibilité de multiples sources et le bien-fondé des preuves utilisées pour tirer des conclusions (preuves)
  • Caractériser différentes époques de l’histoire, y compris les périodes de progrès et de déclin, et relever les moments décisifs qui ont marqué le début de périodes de changement (continuité et changement)
  • Déterminer quelles causes ont le plus influé sur des décisions, des actions ou des événements, et évaluer leurs conséquences à court et à long terme (causes et conséquences)
  • Expliquer les différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d’enjeux ou d’événements du passé ou du présent, et comparer les valeurs, la vision du monde et les croyances de cultures et de sociétés d’une variété d’époques et de lieux (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions passées, et évaluer les limites d’une application directe des leçons tirées du passé (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions:
    • Compétences clés :
      • choisir un problème ou une question à investiguer
      • faire appel à la comparaison, à la classification, à l’inférence, à l’imagination, à la vérification et à l’analogie pour clarifier et définir un problème ou une question
      • comparer les avantages et les inconvénients de diverses formes de communication graphique (p. ex. graphique, table, tableau, carte, photographie, dessin)
      • démontrer la capacité d’interpréter l’échelle et la légende d’un graphique, d’une table et d’une carte (p. ex. climagramme, carte topographique, diagramme circulaire)
      • comparer des cartes de civilisations anciennes et des cartes modernes de la même région
      • choisir une forme de communication graphique adaptée au but recherché (p. ex. un schéma chronologique pour montrer une suite d’événements, une carte pour localiser un lieu)
      • représenter l’information avec justesse et citer systématiquement ses sources
      • choisir une forme de présentation adaptée au but recherché et au public visé (p. ex. multimédia, exposé oral, chanson, pièce de théâtre, présentation écrite)
      • manifester des compétences en débat, notamment la capacité de reconnaître, de discuter, de définir et de clarifier un problème, une question ou une interrogation
  • Évaluer l’importance de personnes, d’événements ou de développements à une époque et dans un lieu donné:
    • Questions clés :
      • Quel explorateur a eu le plus d’influence sur la colonisation de l’Amérique du Nord?
      • L’invention de l’imprimerie devrait-elle être considérée comme un tournant de l’histoire plus important encore que l’arrivée d’Internet? Justifier la réponse.
  • Relever ce que les auteurs de compte rendus, de récits, de cartes ou de textes ont considéré comme important:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • placer sur un schéma chronologique les événements clés de cette période et classer les événements selon leur importance
    • Question clé :
      • Qu’est-ce qui a eu le plus de répercussion sur le monde, le commerce dans l’océan Indien ou la Renaissance italienne?
  • Évaluer la crédibilité de multiples sources et le bien-fondé des preuves utilisées pour tirer des conclusions:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • faire la distinction entre une source primaire et une source secondaire
      • évaluer l’exactitude d’une source (p. ex. relever sa date de rédaction, reconnaître les ambiguïtés et les imprécisions, distinguer les conclusions des arguments, analyser la logique ou la cohérence des conclusions au regard des preuves à l’appui)
      • relever les préjugés qui influencent des documents (p. ex. énoncer différents points de vue, comme celui du propriétaire et celui du locataire, sur un sujet ou une question; déceler les motivations de l’auteur et expliquer comment celles-ci peuvent compromettre sa crédibilité en tant que source; déterminer si une source représente un seul ou plusieurs points de vue)
      • trouver et utiliser des informations pertinentes
      • mesurer la valeur de la littérature de cette période (p. ex. les Contes de Canterbury, le Conte de Genji) comme documents historiques
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment les découvertes en exploration de la planète et en astronomie ont-elles changé les perceptions du monde et de la place de l’humain dans la nature?
      • Qu’est-ce que les différents types de cartes et systèmes de cartographie nous apprennent sur leur culture d’origine?
      • Quelles sources d’information de cette époque sont les plus fiables?
  • Caractériser différentes époques de l’histoire, y compris les périodes de progrès et de déclin, et relever les moments décisifs qui ont marqué le début de périodes de changement:
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment la Révolution industrielle a-t-elle transformé les sociétés?
      • La première révolution industrielle en Grande-Bretagne a-t-elle amélioré les conditions de vie de la plupart des gens?
      • Laquelle a engendré les plus grands changements : la première ou la deuxième révolution industrielle?
      • Comment les réseaux de cette époque, qui se mondialisaient peu à peu, se comparent-ils aux réseaux mondiaux d’aujourd’hui?
  • Déterminer les causes ayant le plus influé sur des décisions, des actions ou des événements, et évaluer leurs conséquences à court et à long terme:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • déterminer si un événement a été causé par des facteurs systémiques sous-jacents (agitation sociale, déclin économique) ou par un événement imprévisible (maladie, catastrophe naturelle)
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment la peste noire a-t-elle précipité la fin du féodalisme au Moyen Âge en Europe?
      • Que serait-il arrivé si les peuples autochtones des Amériques avaient été plus résistants à la variole et à d’autres maladies?
      • Quelles peuvent être les conséquences positives d’un événement négatif, et les conséquences négatives d’un événement positif? (P. ex. le rôle de la peste noire dans le démantèlement du système féodal; les violences ethniques suivant l’indépendance coloniale)
  • Expliquer les différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d’enjeux ou d’événements du passé ou du présent, et comparer les valeurs, la vision du monde et les croyances de cultures et de sociétés d’une variété d’époques et de lieux:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • recueillir et évaluer des sources d’information offrant des points de vue au sujet des personnes, des lieux, des enjeux ou des événements d’une période historique donnée
      • comparer le degré de respect pour l’environnement naturel d’une société à l’autre
      • comparer les facteurs ayant influé sur l'évolution de deux religions du monde importantes
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment les institutions religieuses ont-elles réagi aux changements scientifiques, technologiques, philosophiques et culturels?
      • Qui avait le plus d’influence et de pouvoir en Europe au Moyen Âge : l’État (les monarques) ou l’Église?
      • La religion était-elle la cause première des croisades et des guerres de religion?
  • Porter des jugements éthiques sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions passées, et évaluer les limites d’une application directe des leçons tirées du passé:
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment tel ou tel groupe est-il représenté dans différents récits culturels?
      • Quelles leçons pouvons-nous tirer de la disparition de certaines langues due à l’impérialisme?
content_fr: 
  • Les structures et les systèmes sociaux, politiques et économiques, y compris ceux d’au moins une civilisation autochtone
  • Les innovations scientifiques et technologiques
  • Les changements philosophiques et culturels
  • Les interactions et les échanges de ressources, d’idées, d’œuvres artistiques et de cultures parmi et entre différentes civilisations
  • L’exploration, l’expansion et la colonisation
  • Les changements dans la population et les conditions de vie
content elaborations fr: 
  • Les structures et les systèmes sociaux, politiques et économiques, y compris ceux d’au moins une civilisation autochtone:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les structures sociales et les droits dans la société féodale (comparaison entre l’Europe et le Japon)
      • la Réforme et la Contre-Réforme en Europe
      • la diffusion des religions à travers le monde
      • le déclin des empires
      • la gestion du travail
      • l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes
    • Questions clés :
      • Quel était le statut de la femme dans telle ou telle société à cette époque?
      • Comment les décisions politiques étaient-elles prises à cette époque?
      • Comment la richesse était-elle répartie dans les sociétés à cette époque?
  • Les innovations scientifiques et technologiques:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • le monde arabe, Ibn Battuta, l’âge d’or de l’Islam (diffusion des arts et des mathématiques)
      • Zheng He et la cartographie
      • les instruments de navigation et les explorations des Européens (Portugal, Espagne, Grande-Bretagne)
      • la cartographie et la navigation
      • l’agriculture
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment la technologie a-t-elle profité à la population de cette époque?
      • À quels endroits les grandes découvertes scientifiques et technologiques ont-elles eu lieu?
  • Les changements philosophiques et culturels:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • presse à imprimer
      • la Réforme et la Contre-Réforme en Europe
      • les Lumières
      • les mouvements littéraires et artistiques
  • Les interactions et les échanges de ressources, d’idées, d’œuvres artistiques et de cultures parmi et entre différentes civilisations:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • la Route de la soie, le commerce dans l’océan Indien (p. ex. l’épanouissement des arts, de l’architecture, des mathématiques et de l’Islam)
      • les croisades
      • la diffusion culturelle
      • les changements linguistiques
      • les effets environnementaux
      • l’échange colombien
      • l’impérialisme
      • la Renaissance
      • la Méso-Amérique
  • L’exploration, l’expansion et la colonisation:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • contact et conflit
      • les Amériques
      • formation et dislocation des États
  • Les changements dans la population et les conditions de vie:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les migrations et les déplacements forcés et volontaires de personnes
      • les maladies et la santé
      • l’urbanisation et les effets de l’expansion des communautés
      • les répercussions sur l’environnement (p. ex. l’utilisation des ressources et des terres)
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes