Curriculum Social Studies Grade 9

Subject: 
Social Studies
Grade: 
Grade 9
Big Ideas: 
Emerging ideas and ideologies profoundly influence societies and events.
The physical environment influences the nature of political, social, and economic change.
Disparities in power alter the balance of relationships between individuals and between societies.
Collective identity is constructed and can change over time.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their historical significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)
  • Assess the justification for competing historical accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence)
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups at the same time period (continuity and change)
  • Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, or developments (cause and consequence)
  • Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present, and determine appropriate ways to remember and respond (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Draw conclusions about a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Assess and defend a variety of positions on a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Demonstrate leadership by planning, implementing, and assessing strategies to address a problem or an issue.
      • Identify and clarify a problem or issue.
      • Evaluate and organize collected data (e.g., in outlines, summaries, notes, timelines, charts).
      • Interpret information and data from a variety of maps, graphs, and tables.
      • Interpret and present data in a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, and graphic).
      • Accurately cite sources.
      • Construct graphs, tables, and maps to communicate ideas and information, demonstrating appropriate use of grids, scales, legends, and contours.
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their historical significance at particular times and places, and from group to group:
    • Sample activities:
      • Compare and contrast the events considered by English-Canadian, French-Canadian, and First Peoples scholars to be the most significant during this period.
      • Track and compare key developments in the creation of two nation-states (e.g., Japan, Germany, Canada) during this period.
    • Key questions:
      • To what extent do individuals determine the direction and outcome of revolutions?
      • Would World War I have taken place without the actions of Gavrilo Princip?
  • Assess the justification for competing historical accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence:
    • Sample activities:
      • Identify primary sources (e.g., original documents, political cartoons, interviews, surveys) and secondary sources (e.g., textbooks, articles, reports, summaries, historical monographs) for selected topics.
      • Plan and conduct research using primary and secondary sources, including sources from a range of media types (e.g., print news, broadcast news, online sources) representing a range of perspectives.
      • Assess information sources for selected topics in terms of bias and point of view.
    • Key questions:
      • What evidence is there that imperialism and colonialism still influence present-day relationships between countries and groups?
      • What evidence is there to support John A. Macdonald’s argument that BC would be better off joining the United States if the transcontinental railwaywas not built?
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups at the same time period:
    • Key questions:
      • Why did Baldwin and LaFontaine succeed where Mackenzie and Papineau failed?
      • To what extent was the Scramble for Africa a time of progress or decline?
      • In what ways has the colonization of Canada made life better or worse? And for whom?
  • Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, or developments:
    • Sample activities:
      • Make connections between events and their causes, consequences, and implications.
      • Compare and contrast the origins, course, and outcomes of two different revolutions.
      • Track key developments in Canadian sovereignty and statehood over time, from 1763 to 1931.
    • Key questions:
      • Did the 1837–38 rebellions advance the cause of political sovereignty from Britain in Upper and Lower Canada?
      • To what extent does the American Civil War still cause tensions between the US southern and northern states?
      • To what extent did industrial capacity determine the outcome of conflicts from 1870 to 1918?
      • Do economic factors always play key roles in causing revolutions?
      • What is the true date of Canadian Confederation? Explain your reasoning.
      • What are the most significant reasons for colonial expansion?
      • Did the French Revolution result in positive change for the French people? Explain why or why not.
      • To what extent did the Russo-Japanese War signal the end of European global hegemony?
  • Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs:
    • Sample activities:
      • Examine primary sources (e.g., photographs, newspaper articles, cartoons, speeches) and evaluate what these sources reveal about the worldview and beliefs of the author.
      • Compare primary and secondary sources about a controversial historical person.
    • Key questions:
      • To what extent do sources like newspaper articles reflect the attitudes of society versus the attitudes of authors?
      • What types of sources are best to consult to get a more complete understanding of a particular issue or event?
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment):
    • Key questions:
      • Was the Indian Act an unfortunate but well-meaning mistake or was it a shameful abuse of power? What lessons can we learn from the effects of this legislation?
      • Was Louis Riel a patriot or a rebel?
      • Did the American Revolution result in freedom, liberty, and happiness for people in the colonies? Explain why or why not.
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present, and determine appropriate ways to remember and respond:
    • Key questions:
      • What limits should we place on resource-extraction industries?
      • Were American and Canadian/British policies toward First Peoples an example of pre–twentieth century genocide?
      • Was Canada’s participation in World War I justified?
      • What key factors influenced decisions about who should have the vote (e.g., why were women given the vote after World War I and First Peoples were not?)?
      • Was John A. Macdonald an admirable leader? Explain the reasons for your answer.
Concepts and Content: 
  • political, social, economic, and technological revolutions
  • the continuing effects of imperialism and colonialism on indigenous peoples in Canada and around the world
  • global demographic shifts, including patterns of migration and population growth
  • nationalism and the development of modern nation-states, including Canada
  • local, regional, and global conflicts
  • discriminatory policies, attitudes, and historical wrongs
  • physiographic features of Canada and geological processes
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • political, social, economic, and technological revolutions:
    • Sample topics:
      • American Revolution
      • French Revolution
      • Industrial Revolution
      • Haitian Revolution
      • Red River Resistance, Northwest Resistance
      • advances in science and technology
      • industrialization
      • new methods of transportation, including the railway, steamships, cars, and aircraft
  • the continuing effects of imperialism and colonialism on indigenous peoples in Canada and around the world:
    • Sample topics:
      • impact of treaties on First Peoples (e.g., numbered treaties, Vancouver Island treaties)
      • impact of the Indian Act, including reservations and the residential school system
      • interactions between Europeans and First Peoples
      • the Scramble for Africa
      • Manifest Destiny in the United States
    • Key questions:
      • What were the motivations for imperialism and colonialism during this period?
      • What role does imperialism and colonialism from this period have on events in present-day Canada and around the world?
  • global demographic shifts, including patterns of migration and population growth:
    • Sample topics:
      • slavery
      • disease, poverty, famine, and the search for land
      • why immigrants (including East and South Asian immigrants) came to BC and Canada, the
      • individual challenges they faced, and their contributions to BC and Canada
      • influences of immigration on Canada’s identity
      • historical reasons for the immigration of specific cultural groups to Canada (e.g., Irish potato famine, Chinese railway workforce, World War II refugees, underground railroad, Acadians, western settlement campaign, gold rushes)
    • Key questions:
      • Did immigrants benefit from emigrating to Canada?
      • How did the arrival of new groups of immigrants affect Canadian identity?
  • nationalism and the development of modern nation-states, including Canada:
    • Sample topics:
      • Canadian Confederation
      • national projects and policies (e.g., the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway, Macdonald’s National Policy)
      • responsible government
      • Tokugawa Shogunate
      • Meiji Restoration
      • unifications (e.g., Italy, Germany)
    • Key questions:
      • Is nationalism a more positive or negative force in the world?
      • To what extent does nationalism bring people together or drive them apart?
      • What factors influence nationalism and national identity?
  • local, regional, and global conflicts:
    • Sample topics:
      • Opium Wars
      • Boxer Rebellion
      • Boer War
      • wars of independence in Latin America
      • Armenian genocide
      • Chilcotin War, Fraser Canyon War
      • Fraser Canyon War
      • American Civil War
      • Franco-Prussian War of 1871
      • Russian Revolution
      • Crimean War
      • Russo-Japanese War
      • Chinese Rebellion of 1911
      • World War I
  • discriminatory policies, attitudes, and historical wrongs:
    • Sample topics:
      • Head Tax and other discriminatory immigration policies against people of East and South Asian descent
      • Komagata Maru
      • societal attitudes toward ethnic minorities in Canada (e.g., Chinese railway workers, Sikh loggers, Eastern European farmers, Irish famine refugees, African-American slavery refugees)
      • discriminatory policies toward First Peoples, such as the Indian Act, potlatch ban, residential schools
      • internments
      • social history
      • gender issues
      • suffrage
      • labour history, workers’ rights
      • responses to discrimination in Canada
      • Asiatic Exclusion League in BC
      • discrimination against German-Canadians during World War I
    • Key question:
      • How might specific examples of past incidents of inequality (e.g., Head Tax on Chinese immigrants, internment of Japanese-Canadians, residential schools, suffrage, discriminatory federal government labour practices related to gender and sexual orientation) be handled today under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms?
  • physiographic features of Canada and geological processes:
    • Sample topic:
      • connections between Canada’s natural resources and major economic activities
    • Sample activities:
      • Compare and contrast physical features and natural resources in different regions of Canada
      • Role-play negotiations between a wide range of stakeholders involved in the decision to build a new mine or oil pipeline 
    • Key questions:
      • What effect has the physical geography of Canada had on Canadian and regional identity?
      • What perspectives do different groups (e.g., environmental groups, people employed in the forest industry, First Peoples, urban and rural populations) have on the use of natural resources?
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les idées et les idéologies nouvelles ont eu une profonde influence sur les sociétés et les événements.
L’environnement physique influence la nature des changements politiques, sociaux et économiques.
Le déséquilibre des pouvoirs altère les relations entre les individus et entre les sociétés.
L’identité collective est construite et peut changer au cours du temps.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions
  • Évaluer l’importance de personnes, de lieux, d’événements ou de développements, et comparer différents points de vue sur leur importance  historique selon les lieux, les époques et les groupes (portée)
  • Évaluer la justification derrière des récits historiques divergents après avoir soupesé les points de désaccord, la fiabilité des sources et le bien-fondé des preuves (preuves)
  • Comparer et mettre en contraste les continuités et les changements dans différents groupes à cette époque (continuité et changement)
  • Évaluer dans quelle mesure les conditions en place et les actions d’individus ou de groupes ont eu une incidence sur des événements, des décisions ou des développements (causes et conséquences)
  • Expliquer et inférer différents points de vue au sujet des personnes, des lieux, des enjeux ou des événements du passé ou du présent, en tenant compte des normes, des valeurs, de la vision du monde et des croyances qui dominent (perspective)
  • Reconnaître les jugements éthiques implicites et explicites dans une variété de sources (jugement éthique)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent, et déterminer les façons appropriées de se les rappeler et d'y réagir (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions:
    • Compétences clés :
      • tirer des conclusions sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • évaluer et défendre une variété de points de vue sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • faire preuve de leadership en planifiant, en appliquant et en évaluant des stratégies pour aborder un problème ou une question
      • relever et clarifier un problème ou une question
      • évaluer et organiser les données recueillies (p. ex. aperçu, sommaire, notes, schéma chronologique, tableau)
      • interpréter l’information et les données d’une variété de cartes, graphiques et tableaux
      • interpréter et présenter de l’information ou des données sous diverses formes (p. ex. orale, écrite et graphique)
      • citer ses sources avec exactitude
      • préparer des graphiques, des tableaux et des cartes pour communiquer des idées et de l’information, en démontrant un usage approprié des grilles, des échelles, des légendes et des courbes
  • Évaluer l’importance de personnes, de lieux, d’événements ou de développements, et comparer différents points de vue sur leur importance historique selon les lieux, les époques et les groupes:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • comparer les événements considérés comme les plus importants de cette époque par les intellectuels canadiens-anglais, canadiens-français et autochtones
      • relever et comparer les développements clés de la création de deux États-nations (p. ex. Japon, Allemagne, Canada) durant cette époque
    • Questions clés :
      • Dans quelle mesure les individus déterminent-ils la direction et le résultat des révolutions? 
      • La Première Guerre mondiale aurait-elle éclaté sans l’acte de Gavrilo Princip?
  • Évaluer la justification derrière des récits historiques divergents après avoir soupesé les points de désaccord, la fiabilité des sources et le bien-fondé des preuves:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • identifier les sources primaires (p. ex. documents originaux, caricatures politiques, entrevues, sondages) et les sources secondaires (p. ex. manuels scolaires, articles, reportages, résumés, monographies historiques) d’information sur un sujet
      • planifier et mener une recherche au moyen de sources primaires et secondaires dans divers types de médias (p. ex. journaux et magazines d’actualité, bulletins de nouvelles, sources sur Internet) représentant une variété de points de vue
      • évaluer les sources d’information sur un sujet, en termes de préjugé et de point de vue
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels faits dénotent que l’influence de l’impérialisme et du colonialisme est toujours présente dans les relations entre les États et les groupes?
      • Quels faits soutiennent la thèse de John A. MacDonald, selon laquelle la Colombie-Britannique eût mieux fait de se joindre aux États-Unis si le chemin de fer transcontinental n’avait pas été construit?
  • Comparer et mettre en contraste les continuités et les changements dans différents groupes à cette époque:
    • Questions clés :
      • Pourquoi Baldwin et LaFontaine ont-ils réussi là où Mackenzie et Papineau ont échoué?
      • Le partage de l’Afrique fut-il une période de progrès ou de déclin?
      • Comment la colonisation du Canada a-t-elle amélioré ou détérioré les conditions de vie? Pour qui?
  • Évaluer dans quelle mesure les conditions en place et les actions d’individus ou de groupes ont eu une incidence sur des événements, des décisions et des développements:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • faire des liens entre les événements et leurs causes, leurs conséquences et leurs implications
      • comparer les origines, l’évolution et le résultat de deux révolutions
      • retracer les événements clés de la souveraineté et de l’affirmation du Canada comme État indépendant, entre 1763 et 1931
    • Questions clés :
      • Les révoltes de 1837-1838 ont-elles fait avancer la cause de la souveraineté politique du Haut-Canada et du Bas-Canada à l’endroit de la Grande-Bretagne?
      • Dans quelle mesure la guerre de Sécession des États-Unis est-elle toujours à l’origine de tensions entre les États américains du Nord et du Sud?
      • Dans quelle mesure la capacité industrielle a-t-elle décidé de l’issue des conflits entre 1870 et 1918?
      • Les facteurs économiques jouent-ils toujours un rôle clé dans le déclenchement des révolutions?
      • Quelle est la véritable date de la Confédération du Canada? Justifier.
      • Quelles étaient les principales motivations derrière l’expansion coloniale?
      • La Révolution française a-t-elle amené des changements positifs pour la population de la France? Justifier la réponse.
      • Dans quelle mesure la guerre russo-japonaise marque-t-elle la fin de l’hégémonie mondiale de l’Europe? 
  • Expliquer et inférer différents points de vue au sujet des personnes, des lieux, des enjeux ou des événements du passé ou du présent, en tenant compte des normes, des valeurs, de la vision du monde et des croyances qui dominent:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • examiner des sources primaires (p. ex. photographies, articles de journaux, caricatures, discours) et observer ce qu’elles révèlent sur la vision du monde ou les croyances de l’auteur
      • comparer des sources primaires et secondaires concernant un personnage historique controversé
    • Questions clés :
      • Les sources comme les articles de journaux reflètent-elles les attitudes de la société, de l’auteur, ou un peu des deux?
      • Quels types de sources est-il préférable de consulter pour avoir une compréhension plus complète d’un enjeu ou d’un événement? 
  • Reconnaître les jugements éthiques implicites et explicites dans une variété de sources:
    • Questions clés :
      • La Loi sur les Indiens était-elle une erreur malheureuse, mais bien intentionnée, ou un abus de pouvoir délibéré? Quelles leçons pouvons-nous tirer des conséquences de cette loi?
      • Louis Riel était-il un patriote ou un rebelle?
      • La Révolution américaine s’est-elle soldée par plus de libertés, de droits et de bonheur pour les habitants des colonies? Justifier la réponse.
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent, et déterminer les façons appropriées de se les rappeler et d'y réagir:
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles limites devrait-on imposer aux industries d’extraction de ressources?
      • Les politiques des États-Unis et du Canada/de la Grande-Bretagne envers les peuples autochtones sont-elles un cas de génocide d’avant le XXe siècle?
      • La participation du Canada à la Première Guerre mondiale était-elle justifiée?
      • Quels facteurs ont influé sur les décisions concernant le droit de vote? (P. ex. pourquoi les femmes ont-elles obtenu le droit de vote après la Première Guerre mondiale, et pas les peuples autochtones?)
      • John A. MacDonald fut-il un leader admirable? Justifier.
content_fr: 
  • Les révolutions politiques, sociales, économiques et technologiques
  • L’impérialisme et le colonialisme, et leurs effets durables sur les peuples autochtones du Canada et du monde
  • Les changements démographiques mondiaux, y compris les tendances migratoires et la croissance démographique
  • Le nationalisme et l’avènement des États-nations modernes, y compris le Canada
  • Les conflits locaux, régionaux et mondiaux
  • Les politiques discriminatoires et les injustices au Canada et dans le monde, telles que la taxe d’entrée imposée aux immigrants chinois, l’incident du Komagata Maru, les pensionnats et l'internement pendant la Première Guerre mondiale
  • Les caractéristiques physiographiques et les ressources naturelles du Canada
content elaborations fr: 
  • Les révolutions politiques, sociales, économiques et technologiques:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • Révolution américaine
      • Révolution française
      • Révolution industrielle
      • Révolution haïtienne
      • Rébellion de la rivière Rouge, Rébellion du Nord-Ouest
      • avancées scientifiques et technologiques
      • industrialisation
      • nouveaux moyens de transport, comme le train, le bateau à vapeur, l’automobile et l’avion
  • L’impérialisme et le colonialisme, et leurs effets durables sur les peuples autochtones du Canada et du monde:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les conséquences des traités sur les peuples autochtones (p. ex. traités numérotés, Traités Douglas)
      • les conséquences de la Loi sur les Indiens,notamment les réserves et le système des pensionnats
      • les interactions entre les Européens et les peuples autochtones
      • le partage de l’Afrique
      • la destinée manifeste aux États-Unis
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles étaient les motivations derrière l’impérialisme et le colonialisme à cette époque?
      • Quelle est l’influence de l’impérialisme et du colonialisme de cette époque sur les événements qui se déroulent dans le Canada et le monde d’aujourd’hui?
  • Les changements démographiques dans le monde, y compris les tendances migratoires et la croissance démographique:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • l’esclavage
      • la maladie, la pauvreté, la famine et la quête de terre
      • les raisons pour lesquelles les immigrants (y compris ceux de l’Asie de l’Est et du Sud) sont venus s’établir en Colombie-Britannique et au Canada, les
        difficultés qu’ils ont rencontrées et leurs apports à la Colombie-Britannique et au Canada
      • l’influence de l’immigration sur l’identité canadienne
      • les causes historiques de l’immigration au Canada de groupes culturels donnés (p. ex. Grande Famine irlandaise, ouvriers de chemin de fer chinois, réfugiés de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, chemin de fer clandestin, Acadiens, campagne de peuplement de l’Ouest, ruées vers l’or)
    • Questions clés :
      • L’établissement au Canada a-t-il été bénéfique pour les immigrants?
      • En quoi l’arrivée de nouveaux groupes d’immigrants a-t-elle influencé l’identité canadienne?
  • Le nationalisme et l’avènement des États-nations modernes, y compris le Canada:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • la Confédération canadienne
      • les politiques et projets nationaux (p. ex. construction du chemin de fer Canadien Pacifique, Politique nationale de MacDonald)
      • le gouvernement responsable
      • le shogunat Tokugawa
      • la restauration de Meiji
      • les unifications (p. ex. Italie, Allemagne)
    • Questions clés :
      • Le nationalisme est-il une force généralement positive ou négative dans le monde?
      • Le nationalisme rapproche-t-il ou éloigne-t-il les gens?
      • Quels facteurs influencent le nationalisme et l’identité nationale?
  • Les conflits locaux, régionaux et mondiaux:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les guerres de l’opium
      • la révolte des Boxers
      • la guerre des Boers
      • les guerres d’indépendance en Amérique latine
      • le génocide arménien
      • la guerre de Chilcotin
      • la guerre du canyon Fraser
      • la guerre de Sécession des États-Unis
      • la guerre franco-prussienne de 1870
      • la révolution russe
      • la guerre de Crimée
      • la guerre russo-japonaise
      • la révolution chinoise de 1911
      • la Première Guerre mondiale
  • Les politiques discriminatoires et les injustices au Canada et dans le monde, telles que la taxe d’entrée imposée aux immigrants chinois, l’incident du Komagata Maru, les pensionnats et l'internement pendant la Première Guerre mondiale:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • la taxe d’entrée et autres politiques d’immigration discriminatoires envers les personnes originaires de l’Asie de l’Est et du Sud
      • l’incident du Komagata Maru
      • les opinions de la société envers les minorités ethniques du Canada (p. ex. ouvriers de chemin de fer chinois, bûcherons sikhs, fermiers est-européens, réfugiés de la famine irlandaise, esclaves afro-américains réfugiés)
      • les politiques discriminatoires envers les peuples autochtones, comme la Loi sur les Indiens, l’interdiction du potlatch, les pensionnats
      • les internements
      • l’histoire sociale
      • l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes
      • le droit de vote
      • l’histoire du travail, les droits des travailleurs
      • les réactions à la discrimination au Canada
      • la Ligue d’exclusion asiatique en Colombie-Britannique
      • la discrimination envers les Canadiens d’origine allemande durant la Première Guerre mondiale
    • Question clé :
      • Comment seraient traitées aujourd’hui, avec la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, des inégalités observées dans le passé au Canada (p. ex. taxe d’entrée pour les immigrants chinois, internement des Canado-Japonais, pensionnats, droit de vote, pratiques discriminatoires au travail du gouvernement fédéral selon le sexe ou l’orientation sexuelle)?
  • Les caractéristiques physiographiques et les ressources naturelles du Canada:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les liens entre les ressources naturelles du Canada et ses principales activités économiques
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • comparer les caractéristiques physiques et les ressources naturelles de différentes régions du Canada
      • simuler, dans un jeu de rôles, une négociation entre plusieurs parties intéressées sur la construction d’une mine ou d’un oléoduc
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelle est l’influence de la géographie physique du Canada sur l’identité canadienne et l’identité régionale?
      • Quels sont les points de vue de différents groupes (p. ex. groupes environnementaux, employés de l’industrie forestière, peuples autochtones, populations urbaines, populations rurales) sur l’exploitation des ressources naturelles?
PDF Only: 
No
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes