Curriculum Science Grade 1

Subject: 
Science
Grade: 
Grade 1
Big Ideas: 
Living things have features and behaviours that help them survive in their environment.
Matter is useful because of its properties.
Light and sound can be produced and their properties can be changed.
Observable patterns and cycles occur in the local sky and landscape.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • Living things have features and behaviours that help them survive in their environment:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How do local plants and animals depend on their environment?
      • How do plants and animals use their features to respond to stimuli in their environments?
      • How do plants and animals adapt when their basic needs are not being met?
  • Matter is useful because of its properties:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What makes the properties of matter useful?
      • How do the properties of materials help connect to the function of materials?
  • Light and sound can be produced and their properties can be changed:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How can you explore the properties of light and sound?
      • What discoveries did you make?
  • Observable patterns and cycles occur in the local sky and landscape:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What kinds of patterns in the sky and landscape are you aware of?
      • How do patterns and cycles in the sky and landscape affect living things?
Curricular Competencies: 
Questioning and predicting
  • Questioning and predicting

  • Demonstrate curiosity and a sense of wonder about the world
  • Observe objects and events in familiar contexts
  • Ask questions about familiar objects and events
  • Make simple predictions about familiar objects and events
Planning and conducting
  • Make and record observations
  • Safely manipulate materials to test ideas and predictions
  • Make and record simple measurements using informal or non-standard methods
Processing and analyzing data and information
  • Experience and interpret the local environment
  • Recognize First Peoples stories (including oral and written narratives), songs, and art, as ways to share knowledge
  • Sort and classify data and information using drawings, pictographs and provided tables
  • Compare observations with predictions through discussion
  • Identify simple patterns and connections
Evaluating
  • Compare observations with those of others
  • Consider some environmental consequences of their actions
Applying and innovating
  • Take part in caring for self, family, classroom and school through personal approaches
  • Transfer and apply learning to new situations
  • Generate and introduce new or refined ideas when problem solving
Communicating
  • Communicate observations and ideas using oral or written language, drawing, or role-play
  • Express and reflect on personal experiences of place
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Questioning and predicting: Form and function: Form and function refer to something being designed, structured or shaped in a way that will help it perform a certain function or functions. For example, the fins of fish help them propel themselves through the water. The human skeleton provides protection for organs, and support for muscles, and allows people to stand upright. Science recognizes this important relationship between form and function.
    • Key questions about form and function:
      • What structural features of plants and animals in your local environment help those plants and animals to function well?
      • How do the properties of natural materials (e.g., wood) help determine useful functions for the materials?
  • place: Place is any environment, locality, or context with which people interact to learn, create memory, reflect on history, connect with culture, and establish identity. The connection between people and place is foundational to First Peoples perspectives of the world.
    • Key questions about place:
      • What is place?
      • What are some ways in which people experience place?
      • How can you gain a sense of place in your local environment?
      • How can you share your observations and ideas about living things in your local environment to help someone else learn about place?
Concepts and Content: 
  • classification of living and  non-living things
  • names of local plants and animals
  • structural features of living things in the local environment
  • behavioural adaptations of animals in the local environment
  • specific properties of materials allow us to use them in different ways
  • natural and artificial sources of light and sound (sources)
  • properties of light and sound depend on their source and the objects with which they interact
  • common objects in the sky
  • the knowledge of First Peoples
    • shared First Peoples knowledge of the sky
    • local First Peoples knowledge of the local landscape, plants and animals
    • local First Peoples understanding and use of seasonal rounds
  • local patterns that occur on Earth and in the sky
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • classification:
    • Is it living or non-living? Is it a plant, animal or something else?
    • differences between conventional scientific and indigenous ways of classifying
  • names: e.g., common, indigenous and scientific
  • structural features: How do stems, roots, leaves, skeleton or no skeleton or exoskeleton, lots of legs, few legs, eyes, etc. help us understand organisms?
  • behavioural adaptations: dormancy, hibernation, nesting, migration, catching food, camouflage (stick bugs), mimicry (fly that looks like bee), territorialism (squirrels fighting), etc.
  • specific properties:
    • solids keep shape; liquids and gases flow
    • properties of local materials determine use by First Peoples (local examples: cedar for canoes, mountain goat horns used as spoons, etc.)
  • sources of light: natural sources include the sun; artificial sources include light bulbs
  • sound (sources): natural sources include crickets; artificial sources include car horns
  • properties of light:
    • examples: brightness, colour
    • objects are made visible by radiating their own light or being illuminated by reflected light
    • interactions of light with different objects create images and shadows
    • light interactions can make plants grow, make shadows, or cause sunburn, depending on the source and location (seasons depend on light from the sun and how spread out the sun’s rays are)
    • plants grow toward light
  • sound:
    • examples: pitch, tone, volume
    • ways of making, recording, and transmitting sound, etc.
  • common objects in the sky:
    • the appearance of the moon and stars at night
    • sunrise/set, moonrise/set
    • the sun and the moon are important in different cultures, with respect to customs and traditions
  • local First Peoples:  e.g., may include oral history with Elder—origins and local stories
  • seasonal rounds: Seasonal rounds refers to a pattern of movement from one resource-gathering area to another in a cycle that is followed each year
  • local patterns: the relationship of local weather to the four seasons in terms of temperature, cloud cover, precipitation, and wind
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les êtres vivants ont des caractéristiques et des comportements qui les aident à survivre dans leur environnement.
Les propriétés de la matière lui confèrent son utilité.
Il est possible de produire de la lumière et du son et de moduler leurs propriétés.
On peut observer des régularités dans le ciel et dans le paysage de la région.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • Les êtres vivants ont des caractéristiques et des comportements qui les aident à survivre dans leur environnement:
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Comment les plantes et les animaux de la région sont-ils dépendants de leur environnement?
      • Comment les plantes et les animaux utilisent-ils leurs caractéristiques pour réagir à des stimuli dans leur environnement?
      • Comment les plantes et les animaux s'adaptent-ils lorsque leurs besoins fondamentaux ne sont pas satisfaits?
  • Les propriétés de la matière lui confèrent son utilité:
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Qu'est-ce qui confère une utilité aux propriétés de la matière?
      • Quels sont les liens entre les propriétés des matériaux et leur fonction?
  • Il est possible de produire de la lumière et du son et de moduler leurs propriétés :
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Comment peux-tu explorer les propriétés de la lumière et du son?
      • Quelles découvertes as-tu faites?
  • On peut observer des régularités dans le ciel et dans le paysage de la région:
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Quelles régularités du ciel et du paysage connais-tu?
      • Quelle incidence les régularités et les cycles du ciel et du paysage ont-ils sur les êtres vivants?
competencies_fr: 
Poser des questions et faire des prédictions
  • Poser des questions et faire des prédictions

  • Faire preuve de curiosité et de fascination pour le monde
  • Observer les objets et les événements dans des contextes familiers
  • Poser des questions sur des objets et des événements familiers
  • Faire des prédictions simples sur des objets et des événements familiers
Planifier et exécuter
  • Observer et consigner ses observations
  • Manipuler des matériaux en toute sécurité pour tester des idées et des prédictions
  • Effectuer des mesures simples par des méthodes non normalisées ou non standard, et consigner ces mesures
Traiter et analyser des données et de l’information
  • Découvrir son environnement immédiat et l’interpréter
  • Reconnaître que les histoires (y compris les récits oraux et écrits), les chants et l’art des peuples autochtones permettent de transmettre des connaissances
  • Trier et classifier des données et de l'information au moyen de dessins ou de pictogrammes, ou dans des tableaux fournis
  • Comparer ses observations à des prédictions par la discussion
  • Relever des régularités et des relations simples
Évaluer
  • Comparer ses observations à celles des autres
  • Réfléchir sur certaines conséquences environnementales de ses actions
Appliquer et innover
  • Contribuer au bien-être de soi, de sa famille, de sa classe et de son école par des approches personnelles
  • Transférer et appliquer l’apprentissage à de nouvelles situations
  • Concevoir et présenter des idées nouvelles ou perfectionnées dans le cadre d’une résolution de problème
Communiquer
  • Communiquer ses observations et ses idées verbalement ou par écrit, par un dessin ou un jeu de rôles
  • Exprimer et approfondir ses expériences personnelles sur le lieu
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Poser des questions et faire des prédictions : forme et fonction : modèles, structures ou formes qui aident à accomplir certaines fonctions. Par exemple, les nageoires permettent au poisson de se propulser dans l'eau; le squelette humain protège les organes, soutient les muscles et permet au corps de se maintenir en position debout. La science reconnaît le lien important qui existe entre la forme et la fonction.
    Questions clés sur la forme et la fonction :
    — Quelles caractéristiques structurelles des plantes et des animaux de ta région contribuent à leur bon fonctionnement?
    —  Comment les propriétés des matériaux naturels (p. ex. le bois) déterminent-elles leurs fonctions utiles?
  • Lieu : tout environnement, localité ou contexte avec lesquels interagit une personne pour apprendre, se créer des souvenirs, réfléchir sur l’histoire, faire des liens avec la culture et définir une identité. Le lien entre la personne et le lieu est fondamental dans l'interprétation du monde des peuples autochtones.
    Questions clés sur le lieu :
    —  Qu'est-ce qu'un lieu?
    —  Comment découvre-t-on un lieu?
    —  Comment peux-tu apprendre à mieux connaître les lieux de ta région?
    —  Comment peux-tu communiquer tes observations et idées sur les êtres vivants de ta région afin d'aider d'autres personnes à mieux connaître un lieu?
content_fr: 
  • La classification des êtres vivants et de la matière non vivante
  • Les noms des plantes et des animaux de la région
  • Les caractéristiques structurelles des êtres vivants dans leur environnement
  • Les adaptations comportementales des animaux dans leur environnement
  • Les propriétés particulières des matériaux permettent différentes utilisations
  • Les sources naturelles et artificielles de lumière et de son (sources)
  • Les propriétés de la lumière et du son dépendent de leur source et des objets avec lesquels ils sont en interaction
  • Les corps célestes familiers
  • Les connaissances des peuples autochtones
    • les connaissances collectives des peuples autochtones sur le ciel
    • les connaissances des peuples autochtones de la région sur le paysage, les plantes et les animaux de la région
    • la compréhension et l'utilisation par les peuples autochtones du cercle des saisons
  • Les régularités de la région sur la Terre et dans le ciel
content elaborations fr: 
  • La Classification :
    • s'agit-il d'un être vivant ou d'une matière non vivante? S'agit-il d'une plante, d'un animal ou d'autre chose?
    • les différences entre la classification scientifique conventionnelle et la classification autochtone
  • Les Noms : p. ex. commun, autochtone et scientifique
  • Les Caractéristiques structurelles : comment les caractéristiques structurelles d'un organisme (p. ex. tiges, racines, feuilles, avec ou sans squelette ou exosquelette, beaucoup de pattes, petit nombre de pattes, yeux, etc.) nous aident-elles à mieux le comprendre?
  • Les Adaptations comportementales : dormance, hibernation, nidification, migration, capture de proies, camouflage (phasmes), mimétisme (mouche ayant l'apparence d'une abeille), territorialisme (combat d'écureuils), etc.
  • Les propriétés particulières :
    • les solides gardent leur forme; les liquides et les gaz sont fluides
    • les propriétés des matériaux de la région déterminent leur utilisation par les peuples autochtones (p. ex. cèdre pour fabriquer des canots, corne de chèvre de montagne pour fabriquer des cuillères, etc.)
  • Les sources naturelles et artificielles de lumière : sources naturelles, comme le Soleil; sources artificielles, comme une ampoule électrique
  • Son sources : naturelles, comme un criquet; sources artificielles, comme un klaxon de voiture
  • Les Propriétés de la lumière :
    • exemples : brillance, couleur
    • les objets sont visibles parce qu’ils produisent leur propre rayonnement lumineux ou reflètent la lumière
    • l’interaction entre la lumière et les objets forme les images et les ombres
    • les interactions avec la lumière peuvent faire pousser les plantes, produire des ombres ou causer des coups de soleil, selon la source et la position (les saisons sont caractérisées par la lumière du Soleil et l’angle des rayons solaires)
    • les plantes poussent en direction de la lumière
  • Son :
    • exemples : hauteur tonale, ton, volume
    • manières de produire, d’enregistrer et de transmettre des sons, etc.
  • Corps célestes familiers :
    • l'aspect de la Lune et des étoiles dans le ciel nocturne
    • lever et coucher du Soleil, lever et coucher de la Lune
    • le Soleil et la Lune revêtent une grande importance dans les coutumes et les traditions de différentes cultures
  • Peuples autochtones de la région : p. ex. histoire orale avec un aîné ou une aînée, origines et récits de la région
  • Cercle des saisons : déplacements d'une zone de récolte à une autre qui se font successivement selon un cycle qui est le même chaque année
  • Les Régularités de la région : relations entre le climat de la région et les quatre saisons : température, couverture nuageuse, précipitations et vent
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes