Curriculum Science Grade 2

Subject: 
Science
Grade: 
Grade 2
Big Ideas: 
Living things have life cycles adapted to their environment.
Materials can be changed through physical and chemical processes.
Forces influence the motion of an object.
Water is essential to all living things, and it cycles through the environment.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • Living things have life cycles adapted to their environment:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students
      • Why are life cycles important?
      • How are the life cycles of local plants and animals similar and different?
      • How do offspring compare to their parents?
  • Materials can be changed through physical and chemical processes:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students
      • Why would we want to change the physical properties of an object?
      • What are some natural processes that involve chemical and physical changes?
  • Forces influence the motion of an object:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students
      • What are different ways that objects can be moved?
      • How do different materials influence the motion of an object?
  • Water is essential to all living things, and it cycles through the environment:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students
      • Why is water important for all living things?
      • How can you conserve water in your home and school?
      • How does water cycle through the environment?
Curricular Competencies: 
Questioning and predicting
  • Questioning and predicting

  • Demonstrate curiosity and a sense of wonder about the world
  • Observe objects and events in familiar contexts
  • Ask questions about familiar objects and events 
  • Make simple predictions about familiar objects and events
Planning and conducting
  • Make and record observations
  • Safely manipulate materials to test ideas and predictions
  • Make and record simple measurements using informal or non-standard methods
Processing and analyzing data and information
  • Experience and interpret the local environment
  • Recognize First Peoples stories (including oral and written narratives), songs, and art, as ways to share knowledge
  • Sort and classify data and information using drawings,  pictographs and provided tables
  • Compare observations with predictions through discussion
  • Identify simple patterns and connections
Evaluating
  • Compare observations with those of others
  • Consider some environmental consequences of their actions
Applying and innovating
  • Take part in caring for self, family, classroom and school through personal approaches
  • Transfer and apply learning to new situations
  • Generate and introduce new or refined ideas when problem solving
Communicating
  • Communicate observations and ideas using oral or written language, drawing, or role-play
  • Express and reflect on personal experiences of place
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Questioning and predicting: Cycles are sequences or series of events that repeat/reoccur over time.  A subset of pattern, cycles are looping or circular (cyclical) in nature. Cycles help people make predictions and hypotheses about the cyclical nature of the observable patterns.
    • Key questions about cycles:
      • How do First Peoples use their knowledge of life cycles to ensure sustainability in their local environments?
      • How does the water cycle impact weather?
  • place: Place is any environment, locality, or context with which people interact to learn, create memory, reflect on history, connect with culture, and establish identity. The connection between people and place is foundational to First Peoples perspectives of the world.
    • Key questions about place:
      • What is place?
      • What are some ways in which people experience place?
      • How can you gain a sense of place in your local environment?
      • How can you share your observations and ideas about living things in your local environment to help someone else learn about place?
Concepts and Content: 
  • metamorphic and non-metamorphic life cycles of different organisms
  • similarities and differences between offspring and parent
  • First Peoples use of their knowledge of life cycles
  • physical ways of changing materials
  • chemical ways of changing materials
  • types of forces
  • water sources including local watersheds
  • water conservation
  • the water cycle
  • local First People’s knowledge of water:
    • water cycles
    • conservation
    • connection to other systems
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • metamorphic: metamorphic life cycles: body structure changes (e.g., caterpillar to butterfly, mealworm transformation, tadpoles to frog)
  • non-metamorphic: non-metamorphic life cycles: organism keeps same body structure through life but size changes (e.g., humans)
  • offspring and parent: a kitten looks like cat and a puppy looks like dog but they do change as they grow; salmon change a great deal as they grow and need fresh and salt water environments to survive
  • First Peoples use of their knowledge:
    • stewardship: sustainably gathering plants and hunting/fishing in response to seasons and animal migration patterns (e.g., clam gardens, seasonal rounds, etc.)
    • sustainable fish hatchery programs run by local First Peoples
  • physical: physical ways of changing materials:
    • warming, cooling, cutting, bending, stirring, mixing
    • materials may be combined or physically changed to be used in different ways (e.g., plants can be ground up and combined with other materials to make dyes)
  • chemical: chemical ways of changing materials: cooking, burning, etc.
  • forces:
    • contact forces and at-a-distance forces:
      • different types of magnets
      • static electricity
    • balanced and unbalanced forces:
      • the way different objects fall depending on their shape (air resistance)
      • the way objects move over/in different materials (water, air, ice, snow)
      • the motion caused by different strengths of forces
  • water sources:
    • oceans, lakes, rivers, wells, springs
    • the majority of fresh water is stored underground and in glaciers
  • water conservation: fresh water is a limited resource and is not being replaced at the same rate as it is being used
  • water cycle: The water cycle is driven by the sun and includes evaporation, condensation, precipitation, and runoff. The water cycle is also a major component of weather (e.g., precipitation, clouds).
  • connection to other systems: cultural significance of water (i.e., water is essential for all interconnected forms of life)
Big Ideas FR: 
Les êtres vivants ont des cycles de vie adaptés à leur environnement.
Les matériaux peuvent être transformés par des processus physiques et chimiques.
Les forces influent sur le mouvement d’un objet.
L’eau est essentielle à tous les êtres vivants et effectue un cycle dans l’environnement.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • Les êtres vivants ont des cycles de vie adaptés à leur environnement:
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Pourquoi les cycles de vie sont-ils importants?
      • En quoi les cycles de vie des plantes et des animaux de la région sont-ils similaires et différents?
      • Comment les descendants se comparent-ils à leurs parents?
  • Les matériaux peuvent être transformés par des processus physiques et chimiques:
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Pourquoi voudrait-on changer les propriétés physiques d'un objet?
      • Dans quels processus naturels y a-t-il des transformations physiques ou chimiques?
  • Les forces influent sur le mouvement d’un objet:
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • De quelles manières peut-on déplacer des objets?
      • Quelle incidence les matériaux ont-ils sur le mouvement des objets?
  • L’eau est essentielle à tous les êtres vivants et effectue un cycle dans l’environnement:
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Pourquoi l'eau est-elle importante pour tous les êtres vivants?
      • Comment peux-tu éviter de gaspiller l'eau à la maison et à l'école?
      • Comment l'eau circule-t-elle dans l'environnement?
competencies_fr: 
Poser des questions et faire des prédictions
  • Poser des questions et faire des prédictions

  • Faire preuve de curiosité et de fascination pour le monde
  • Observer les objets et les événements dans des contextes familiers
  • Poser des questions sur des objets et des événements familiers
  • Faire des prédictions simples sur des objets et des événements familiers
Planifier et exécuter
  • Observer et consigner ses observations
  • Manipuler des matériaux en toute sécurité pour tester des idées et des prédictions
  • Effectuer des mesures simples par des méthodes non normalisées ou non standard, et consigner ces mesures
Traiter et analyser des données et de l’information
  • Découvrir son environnement immédiat et l’interpréter
  • Reconnaître que les histoires (y compris les récits oraux et écrits), les chants et l’art des peuples autochtones permettent de transmettre des connaissances
  • Trier et classifier des données et de l'information au moyen de dessins ou de pictogrammes, ou dans des tableaux fournis
  • Comparer ses observations à des prédictions par la discussion
  • Relever des régularités et des relations simples
Évaluer
  • Comparer ses observations à celles des autres
  • Réfléchir sur certaines conséquences environnementales de ses actions
Appliquer et innover
  • Contribuer au bien-être de soi, de sa famille, de sa classe et de son école par des approches personnelles
  • Transférer et appliquer l’apprentissage à de nouvelles situations
  • Concevoir et présenter des idées nouvelles ou perfectionnées dans le cadre d’une résolution de problème
Communiquer
  • Communiquer ses observations et ses idées verbalement ou par écrit, par un dessin ou un jeu de rôles
  • Exprimer et approfondir ses expériences personnelles sur le lieu
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Poser des questions et faire des prédictions : les cycles sont des séquences ou des séries d'événements qui se répètent ou se reproduisent à une certaine fréquence. Les cycles sont des sous-ensembles de régularités et se produisent en boucle ou de manière circulaire (cyclique) dans la nature. Les cycles aident à faire des prédictions et des hypothèses sur la nature cyclique des régularités observables.
    Questions clés sur les cycles :
    —  Comment les peuples autochtones utilisent-ils leurs connaissances des cycles de vie pour assurer la durabilité des environnements de leur région?
    —  Quelle incidence le cycle de l'eau a-t-il sur le climat?
  • Lieu : tout environnement, localité ou contexte avec lesquels interagit une personne pour apprendre, se créer des souvenirs, réfléchir sur l’histoire, faire des liens avec la culture et définir une identité. Le lien entre la personne et le lieu est fondamental dans l'interprétation du monde des peuples autochtones.
    Questions clés sur le lieu :
    —  Qu'est-ce qu'un lieu?
    —  Comment découvre-t-on un lieu?
    —  Comment peux-tu apprendre à mieux connaître les lieux de ta région?
    —  Comment peux-tu communiquer tes observations et idées sur les êtres vivants de ta région afin d'aider d'autres personnes à mieux connaître un lieu?
content_fr: 
  • Le cycle de vie de différents organismes avec et sans métamorphose
  • Les différences et les similitudes entre descendant et parent
  • Les peuples autochtones utilisent leurs connaissances des cycles de vie
  • Les moyens physiques de transformer les matériaux
  • Les moyens chimiques de transformer les matériaux
  • Les types de forces
  • Les sources d'eau, y compris les bassins hydrologiques de la région
  • La conservation de l'eau
  • Le cycle de l'eau
  • Les connaissances des peuples autochtones de la région sur l'eau :
    • cycles de l'eau
    • conservation
    • liens avec d'autres systèmes
content elaborations fr: 
  • avec : changements structuraux du corps (p. ex. chenille à papillon, transformation du ver de farine, têtard à grenouille)
  • sans : conservation de la même structure corporelle durant toute la vie de l’organisme, avec changement de taille (p. ex. humains)
  • Descendant et parent : un chaton ressemble à un chat et un chiot ressemble à un chien, mais ces espèces changent en grandissant; le saumon change énormément durant sa vie et a besoin de milieux en eau salée et en eau douce pour compléter son cycle de vie
  • Les peuples autochtones utilisent leurs connaissances :
    • gestion responsable de l’environnement : récolte durable des plantes; chasse et pêche en fonction des saisons et des habitudes de migration des animaux (p. ex. zones de cueillette de myes, cercle des saisons, etc.)
    • alevinières durables gérées par des peuples autochtones de la région
  • Les moyens physiques : moyens physiques de transformer les matériaux
    • chauffer, refroidir, couper, plier, agiter, mélanger
    • les matériaux peuvent être assemblés ou modifiés physiquement pour différentes utilisations (p. ex. broyer des plantes et les mélanger à d’autres matériaux pour produire de la teinture)
  • Les moyens chimiques : moyens chimiques de transformer les matériaux – cuire, brûler, etc.
  • Forces :
    • forces de contact et forces à distance :
      • différents types d’aimants
      • électricité statique
    • forces équilibrées et forces non équilibrées :
      • la chute d’un objet varie selon sa forme (résistance à l’air)
      • le mouvement d’un objet sur ou dans différents matériaux (eau, air, glace, neige)
      • la quantité de mouvement induite en fonction de la force appliquée
  • Les sources d'eau :
    • océans, lacs, cours d’eau, puits, sources
    • la majorité de l'eau douce se trouve dans les nappes souterraines et les glaciers
  • Conservation de l'eau : l'eau douce est une ressource limitée dont le taux de consommation dépasse le taux de renouvellement
  • Cycle de l’eau : le cycle de l’eau est mû par le Soleil et comprend l’évaporation, la condensation, les précipitations et l’écoulement. Le cycle de l’eau est un élément fondamental du climat (p. ex. précipitations, nuages).
  • Liens avec d'autres systèmes : importance culturelle de l'eau (l'eau est essentielle à toutes les formes de vie)
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes