Curriculum Science Grade 4

Subject: 
Science
Grade: 
Grade 4
Big Ideas: 
All living things sense and respond to their environment.
Matter has mass, takes up space, and can change phase.
Energy can be transformed.
The motions of Earth and the moon cause observable patterns that affect living and non-living systems.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • All living things sense and respond to their environment:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How do living things sense, respond, and adapt to stimuli in their environment?
      • How is sensing and responding related to interdependence within ecosystems?
  • Matter has mass, takes up space, and can change phase:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How can you explore the phases of matter?
      • How does matter change phases?
      • How does heating and cooling affect phase changes?
  • Energy can be transformed:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What is energy input and energy output?
      • What is energy conservation?
      • What is the relationship between energy input, output, and conservation?
  • The motions of Earth and the moon cause observable patterns that affect living and non-living systems:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How do seasons and tides affect living and non-living things?
      • What changes are caused by the movements of Earth and the moon?
Curricular Competencies: 
Questioning and predicting
  • Questioning and predicting

  • Demonstrate curiosity about the natural world
  • Observe objects and events in familiar contexts
  • Identify questions about familiar objects and events that can be investigated scientifically
  • Make predictions based on prior knowledge
Planning and conducting
  • Suggest ways to plan and conduct an inquiry to find answers to their questions
  • Consider ethical responsibilities when deciding how to conduct an experiment
  • Safely use appropriate tools to make observations and measurements, using formal measurements and digital technology as appropriate
  • Make observations about living and non-living things in the local environment
  • Collect simple data
Processing and analyzing data and information
  • Experience and interpret the local environment
  • Identify First Peoples perspectives and knowledge as sources of information
  • Sort and classify data and information using drawings or provided tables
  • Use tables, simple bar graphs, or other formats  to represent data and show simple patterns and trends
  • Compare results with predictions, suggesting possible reasons for findings
Evaluating
  • Make simple inferences based on their results and prior knowledge
  • Reflect on whether an investigation was a fair test
  • Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of evidence
  • Identify some simple environmental implications of their and others’ actions
Applying and innovating
  • Contribute to care for self, others, school, and neighbourhood through individual or collaborative approaches
  • Co-operatively design projects
  • Transfer and apply learning to new situations
  • Generate and introduce new or refined ideas when problem solving
Communicating
  • Represent and communicate ideas and findings in a variety of ways, such as diagrams and simple reports, using digital technologies as appropriate
  • Express and reflect on personal or shared experiences of place
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Questioning and predicting:  Order is a pattern that can be recognized as having levels—big to small, simple to complex—or as a process with a sequence of steps.
    • Key questions about order:
      • How is order apparent in the adaptations of forest animals in BC?
      • How does the order of seasons impact local plants and animals?
  • place: Place is any environment, locality, or context with which people interact to learn, create memory, reflect on history, connect with culture, and establish identity. The connection between people and place is foundational to First Peoples perspectives of the world.
    • Key questions about place:
      • How does what you know about place affect your observations, questions, and predictions?
      • How does understanding place help you analyze information and recognize connections and relationships in your local environment?
      • How does place connect with stewardship?
      • How can you be a steward in your local environment?
Concepts and Content: 
  • sensing and responding:
    • humans
    • other animals
    • plants
  • biomes as large regions with similar environmental features
  • phases of matter
  • the effect of temperature on particle movement
  • energy:
    • has various forms
    • is conserved
  • devices that transform energy
  • local changes caused by Earth’s axis, rotation, and orbit
  • the effects of the relative positions of the sun, moon, and Earth including local First Peoples perspectives
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • humans: e.g., the five senses
  • other animals: e.g., echolocation, UV sensors, magnetoreception, infrared sensing, etc.
  • plants: e.g., response to light, touch, water, gravity, etc.
  • biomes: biomes are regions grouped by similar temperature and precipitation (e.g., climate: long-term weather patterns)
    • terrestrial biomes
    • aquatic/marine biomes
  • effect of temperature: solids, liquids, and gases change with heating (e.g., boiling point, melting point [melting chocolate]) and cooling (e.g., freezing point [making ice cream]), and these physical changes are reversible
  • various forms: energy can be described in these ways: the energy of motion (kinetic), light, sound, thermal, elastic, nuclear, chemical, magnetic, gravitational, and electrical
  • conserved: the law of conservation of energy — energy cannot be created or destroyed but can be changed
  • devices that transform energy: devices that transform energy change input energy into a different output energy (e.g., glow stick [chemical to light], wind-up toy [elastic to mechanical], flashlight [electrical to light]).
  • Earth’s axis, rotation, and orbit: Earth’s axis, rotation, and orbit cause changes locally:
    • day and night: animals are nocturnal (active at night) and diurnal (active during day)
    • annual seasons: plants and animals respond to the seasons (drop leaves, change colour)
  • the effects of the relative positions of the sun, moon, and Earth:
    • phases of the moon, tides, etc.
    • tides affect living organisms
    • lunar and solar eclipses
  • local First Peoples perspectives: teachings and stories about the sun and the moon
Big Ideas FR: 
Tous les êtres vivants perçoivent leur environnement et y réagissent.
La matière a une masse, occupe un volume et peut changer de phase.
L’énergie peut être transformée.
Les mouvements de la Terre et de la Lune sont à l’origine de régularités observables qui ont des effets sur les systèmes vivants et non vivants.
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • Tous les êtres vivants perçoivent leur environnement et y réagissent:
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Comment les êtres vivants perçoivent-ils les stimuli dans leur environnement et comment y réagissent-ils et s’y adaptent-ils?
      • Quel est le lien entre la perception, la réaction et l’interdépendance dans les écosystèmes?
  • La matière a une masse, occupe un volume et peut changer de phase:
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Comment peux-tu explorer les phases de la matière?
      • Comment la matière change-t-elle de phase?
      • Quelle incidence la chaleur et le froid ont-ils sur les changements de phases?
  • L’énergie peut être transformée :
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Que sont les intrants énergétiques et qu’est-ce que la production énergétique?
      • Qu'est-ce que la conservation de l'énergie?
      • Quel est le lien entre les intrants énergétiques, la production énergétique et la conservation?
  • Les mouvements de la Terre et de la Lune sont à l’origine de régularités observables qui ont des effets sur les systèmes vivants et non vivants:
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Quelle incidence les saisons et les marées ont-elles sur les êtres vivants et sur la matière non vivante?
      • Quels changements les mouvements de la Terre et de la Lune provoquent-ils?
competencies_fr: 
Poser des questions et faire des prédictions
  • Poser des questions et faire des prédictions

  • Faire preuve de curiosité à l’égard de la nature
  • Observer les objets et les événements dans des contextes familiers
  • Poser des questions sur des objets et des événements familiers qui peuvent être explorées selon la méthode scientifique
  • Faire des prédictions fondées sur des connaissances antérieures
Planifier et exécuter
  • Suggérer des manières de planifier et de mener une recherche pour trouver des réponses à ses questions
  • Réfléchir aux responsabilités éthiques liées à la manière de mener ses expériences
  • Utiliser en toute sécurité des outils appropriés pour faire des observations et prendre des mesures, avec des instruments de mesure conventionnels et des technologies numériques, selon les besoins
  • Faire des observations sur les êtres vivants et la matière non vivante dans son milieu
  • Recueillir des données simples
Traiter et analyser des données et de l’information
  • Découvrir son environnement immédiat et l’interpréter
  • Reconnaître les perspectives et les connaissances des peuples autochtones comme des sources d'information
  • Trier et classifier des données et de l’information au moyen de dessins ou dans des tableaux fournis
  • Utiliser des tableaux, des diagrammes à bandes simples ou d’autres moyens pour représenter des données et montrer des régularités et des tendances simples
  • Comparer ses résultats et ses prédictions, et tenter d’expliquer ses résultats
Évaluer
  • Tirer des conclusions (par inférence) en se fondant sur ses résultats et ses connaissances antérieures
  • Réfléchir sur l’objectivité de la recherche
  • Démontrer une compréhension et une appréciation des données
  • Relever quelques conséquences simples de ses propres actions et des actions des autres sur l’environnement
Appliquer et innover
  • Contribuer au bien-être de soi, des autres, de son école et de son quartier par des approches personnelles ou collaboratives
  • Concevoir des projets en collaboration
  • Transférer et appliquer l’apprentissage à de nouvelles situations
  • Concevoir et présenter des idées nouvelles ou perfectionnées dans le cadre d’une résolution de problème
Communiquer
  • Représenter et communiquer des idées et des résultats de diverses façons, notamment par des diagrammes et des rapports simples, en utilisant des technologies numériques au besoin
  • Exprimer et approfondir ses expériences personnelles ou collectives sur le lieu
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Poser des questions et faire des prédictions : un ordre est une organisation par niveaux (p. ex. du plus petit au plus grand, du plus simple au plus complexe) ou une séquence d’étapes.
    • Questions clés sur l'ordre :
      • Quel ordre peut-on observer dans les adaptations des animaux des forêts de la Colombie-Britannique?
      • Quelle incidence l'ordre des saisons a-t-il sur les plantes et les animaux de la région?
  • Lieu : tout environnement, localité ou contexte avec lesquels interagit une personne pour apprendre, se créer des souvenirs, réfléchir sur l’histoire, faire des liens avec la culture et définir une identité. Le lien entre la personne et le lieu est fondamental dans l'interprétation du monde des peuples autochtones.
    • Questions clés sur le lieu :
      • En quoi tes connaissances sur un lieu influencent-elles tes observations, tes questions et tes prédictions?
      • Comment ta compréhension d'un lieu t'aide-t-elle à analyser l'information et à reconnaître les liens présents dans l'environnement de ta région?
      • Quel est le lien entre le lieu et la gestion responsable de l’environnement?
      • Comment peux-tu agir comme gardien de l'environnement dans ta région?
content_fr: 
  • Percevoir et réagir :
    • humains
    • autres animaux
    • plantes
  • Les biomes sont de vastes régions ayant les mêmes caractéristiques environnementales
  • Les phases de la matière
  • L'effet de la température sur le mouvement des particules
  • L’énergie :
    • prend des formes variées
    • se conserve
  • Les machines qui transforment l’énergie
  • Les changements observables dans la région que l'on peut attribuer à l'axe, à la rotation et à l'orbite de la Terre
  • Les effets des positions relatives du Soleil, de la Lune et de la Terre, y compris les perspectives des peuples autochtones de la région
content elaborations fr: 
  • Humains : p. ex. les cinq sens
  • Autres animaux : p. ex. écholocalisation, capteurs d'ultraviolets, magnétoréception, détection infrarouge, etc.
  • Plantes : p. ex. réaction à la lumière, au toucher, à l'eau, à la gravité, etc.
  • Les Biomes : regroupement de régions ayant des températures et des précipitations semblables (p. ex. climat : tendances météorologiques à long terme)
    • biomes terrestres
    • biomes aquatiques et marins
  • l'Effet de la température : les solides, les liquides et les gaz changent quand ils sont chauffés (p. ex. point d’ébullition, point de fusion [chocolat qui fond]) et quand ils sont refroidis (p. ex. point de congélation [fabrication de la crème glacée]), et ces transformations physiques sont réversibles
  • Formes variées : l'énergie peut être décrite comme étant cinétique, lumineuse, acoustique, thermique, élastique, nucléaire, chimique, magnétique, mécanique , gravitationnelle et électrique
  • Conserve : la loi de la conservation de l’énergie – l’énergie ne peut être créée ni détruite, mais elle peut être transformée
  • Les Machines qui transforment l’énergie : machines qui reçoivent l’énergie sous une forme et qui la renvoient sous une forme différente (p. ex. bâton lumineux [énergie chimique en énergie lumineuse], jouet à ressort [énergie élastique en énergie mécanique], lampe de poche [énergie électrique en énergie lumineuse]).
  • l'axe, à la rotation et à l'orbite de la Terre : l’axe, la rotation et l’orbite de la Terre sont à l’origine de changements observables :
    • jour et nuit – animaux nocturnes (actifs la nuit) et diurnes (actifs le jour)
    • saisons – les plantes et les animaux réagissent aux saisons (perte de feuilles, changement de couleur)
  • les Effets des positions relatives du Soleil, de la Lune et de la Terre :
    • phases de la Lune, marées, etc.
    • marées – effets sur les organismes vivants
    • éclipses lunaires et solaires
  • Perspectives des peuples autochtones de la région : enseignements et récits sur le Soleil et la Lune
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes