Curriculum Science Grade 6

Subject: 
Science
Grade: 
Grade 6
Big Ideas: 
Multicellular organisms rely on internal systems to survive, reproduce, and interact with their environment.
Everyday materials are often mixtures.
Newton’s three laws of motion describe the relationship between force and motion.
The solar system is part of the Milky Way, which is one of billions of galaxies.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • Multicellular organisms rely on internal systems to survive, reproduce, and interact with their environment:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How are internal systems necessary for survival?
      • What do your body systems require for survival?
      • How do your body systems interact with one another?
  • Everyday materials are often mixtures:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What is a heterogeneous mixture?
      • How can mixtures be separated?
  • Newton’s three laws of motion describe the relationship between force and motion:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What is the difference between motion caused by balanced forces and motion caused by unbalanced forces?
      • How are balanced and unbalanced forces evident in your life and activities?
  • The solar system is part of the Milky Way, which is one of billions of galaxies:
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What are the relationships between Earth and the rest of the universe?
      • What is an extreme environment?
      • What extreme environments exist on Earth or in our galaxy?
Curricular Competencies: 
Questioning and predicting
  • Questioning and predicting

  • Demonstrate a sustained curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal interest
  • Make observations in familiar or unfamiliar contexts
  • Identify questions to answer or problems to solve through scientific inquiry
  • Make predictions about the findings of their inquiry
Planning and conducting
  • With support, plan appropriate investigations to answer their questions or solve problems they have identified
  • Decide which variable should be changed and measured for a fair test
  • Choose appropriate data to collect to answer their questions
  • Observe, measure, and record data, using appropriate tools, including digital technologies
  • Use equipment and materials safely, identifying potential risks
Processing and analyzing data and information
  • Experience and interpret the local environment
  • Identify First Peoples perspectives and knowledge as sources of information
  • Construct and use a variety of methods, including tables, graphs, and digital technologies, as appropriate, to represent patterns or relationships in data
  • Identify patterns and connections in data
  • Compare data with predictions and develop explanations for results
  • Demonstrate an openness to new ideas and consideration of alternatives
Evaluating
  • Evaluate whether their investigations were fair tests
  • Identify possible sources of error
  • Suggest improvements to their investigation methods
  • Identify some of the assumptions in secondary sources
  • Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of evidence
  • Identify some of the social, ethical, and environmental implications of the findings from their own and others’ investigations
Applying and innovating
  • Contribute to care for self, others, and community through personal or collaborative approaches
  • Co-operatively design projects
  • Transfer and apply learning to new situations
  • Generate and introduce new or refined ideas when problem solving
Communicating
  • Communicate ideas, explanations, and processes in a variety of ways
  • Express and reflect on personal, shared, or others’ experiences of place
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Questioning and predicting:  Change is making the form, nature, content or future course of something different from what it is or what it would be if left alone.  For example, Newton’s third law, the idea that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction describes the changes that occur in response to pushes and pulls.
    • Key questions about change:
      • How has our solar system changed over time?
      • How has the exploration of extreme environments on Earth and in space changed in the last decade?
  • secondary sources: secondary sources of evidence could include anthropological and contemporary accounts of First Peoples of BC, news media, archives, journals, etc.
  • place: Place is any environment, locality, or context with which people interact to learn, create memory, reflect on history, connect with culture, and establish identity. The connection between people and place is foundational to First Peoples perspectives of the world.
    • Key questions about place:
      • How does place influence your ability to plan and conduct an inquiry?
      • How does your understanding of place affect the ways in which you collect evidence and evaluate it?
      • How do the place-based experiences and stories of others affect the ways in which you communicate your findings and other information?
      • Ways of knowing refers to the various beliefs about the nature of knowledge that people have; they can include, but are not limited to, Aboriginal, gender-related, subject/discipline specific, cultural, embodied and intuitive beliefs about knowledge. What are the connections between ways of knowing and place?
Concepts and Content: 
  • the basic structures and functions of body systems:
    • excretory
    • reproductive
    • hormonal
    • nervous
  • heterogeneous mixtures
  • mixtures:
    • separated using a difference in component properties
    • local First Peoples knowledge of separation and extraction methods
  • Newton’s three laws of motion
  • effects of balanced and unbalanced forces in daily physical activities
  • force of gravity
  • the overall scale, structure, and age of the universe
  • the position, motion, and components of our solar system in our galaxy
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • systems: First People’s understandings of body systems in humans and animals
  • excretory: kidneys, ureters, bladder, etc.
  • reproductive: ovaries, testes, etc.
  • hormonal: chemical messengers in the body (e.g., insulin, adrenalin)
  • nervous: brain, spinal cord, etc.; role of receptors — the brain interprets the signals received and can make mistakes (e.g., optical illusions) in those interpretations
  • heterogeneous mixtures: suspensions (e.g., salad dressing), emulsions (e.g., milk), colloids (e.g., aerosols)
  • separated using a difference in component properties:
    • density (e.g., centrifuge or settling, silt deposits in a river delta, tailings ponds, Roman aqueduct settling sections)
    • particle size (e.g., sieves, filters)
  • local First Peoples knowledge: historical and current First Peoples use of separation and extraction methods (e.g., eulachon oil, extraction of medicines from plants, pigments, etc.)
  • Newton’s three laws of motion:
    • first law: objects will stay stopped or in constant motion until acted upon by an outside force
    • second law: only an unbalanced force causes acceleration
    • third law: every force has an equal and opposite reaction force
  • balanced and unbalanced forces:
    • balanced forces are equal and opposite forces (e.g., sitting in a chair)
    • unbalanced forces are unequal; one force is larger (e.g., race cars on different ramps, mousetrap cars, rockets)
  • daily physical activities: examples of effects of balanced and unbalanced forces in school sports and physical education activities
  • force of gravity:
    • gravity is the force of attraction between objects that pulls all objects toward each other
    • on Earth, gravity pulls objects toward the centre of the planet (e.g., falling objects, egg drop)
  • components of our solar system:
    • planets, moons, asteroids, meteors, comets, etc.
    • First Peoples perspectives regarding aurora borealis and other celestial phenomena
    • extreme environments including contributions of Canadians to exploration technologies (e.g., Canadarm, Newt Suit, VENUS and NEPTUNE programs)
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les organismes multicellulaires possèdent des systèmes internes qui leur permettent de survivre, de se reproduire et d’interagir avec leur environnement.
Les matériaux de tous les jours sont souvent des mélanges.
Les trois lois du mouvement de Newton décrivent la relation entre la force et le mouvement.
Notre système solaire fait partie de la Voie lactée, qui est une galaxie parmi des milliards d’autres dans l’Univers.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • Les organismes multicellulaires possèdent des systèmes internes qui leur permettent de survivre, de se reproduire et d’interagir avec leur environnement :
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • En quoi les systèmes internes sont-ils essentiels à la survie?
      • De quoi les systèmes de ton corps ont-ils besoin pour assurer ta survie?
      • Comment les systèmes de ton corps interagissent-ils entre eux?
  • Les matériaux de tous les jours sont souvent des mélanges :
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Qu'est-ce qu'un mélange hétérogène?
      • Comment les mélanges peuvent-ils être séparés?
  • Les trois lois du mouvement de Newton décrivent la relation entre la force et le mouvement :
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Quelle est la différence entre un mouvement provoqué par des forces équilibrées et un mouvement provoqué par des forces non équilibrées?
      • Observes-tu des forces équilibrées et des forces non équilibrées dans ton quotidien et dans tes activités?
  • Notre système solaire fait partie de la Voie lactée, qui est une galaxie parmi des milliards d’autres dans l’Univers :
    • Exemples de questions pour appuyer les réflexions des élèves :
      • Quelles sont les relations entre la Terre et le reste de l’Univers?
      • Qu'est-ce qu'un environnement extrême?
      • Quels environnements extrêmes y a-t-il sur la Terre ou dans notre galaxie?
 


     
competencies_fr: 
Poser des questions et faire des prédictions
  • Poser des questions et faire des prédictions

  • Faire preuve d’une curiosité soutenue sur un sujet scientifique ou un problème qui revêt un intérêt personnel
  • Faire des observations dans des contextes familiers ou non
  • Relever les questions à poser ou les problèmes à résoudre par l’investigation scientifique
  • Faire des prédictions sur les résultats de sa recherche
Planifier et exécuter
  • Avec du soutien, planifier une recherche appropriée pour répondre aux questions ou résoudre les problèmes relevés
  • Déterminer la variable qui doit être modifiée et mesurée pour mener une expérience objective
  • Choisir les données appropriées à recueillir pour répondre à une question
  • Observer, mesurer et consigner des données, en utilisant des outils appropriés, y compris les technologies numériques
  • Utiliser l’équipement et les matériaux de manière sécuritaire, en en reconnaissant les risques potentiels
Traiter et analyser des données et de l’information
  • Découvrir son environnement immédiat et l’interpréter
  • Reconnaître les perspectives et les connaissances des peuples autochtones comme des sources d'information
  • Élaborer et utiliser une variété de méthodes, notamment des tableaux, des graphiques et des technologies numériques, selon les besoins, pour représenter des régularités ou des relations dans les données
  • Relever les régularités et les relations dans les données
  • Comparer les données et les prédictions, et élaborer des explications pour les résultats obtenus
  • Faire preuve d’ouverture envers les idées nouvelles et envisager plusieurs solutions
Évaluer
  • Évaluer l’objectivité de ses recherches
  • Relever les sources d’erreur possibles
  • Suggérer des améliorations à ses méthodes de recherche
  • Relever certains a priori dans les sources secondaires
  • Démontrer une compréhension et une appréciation des données
  • Relever certaines des conséquences sociales, éthiques et environnementales des résultats de ses propres recherches et des recherches des autres
Appliquer et innover
  • Contribuer au bien-être de soi, des autres et de sa communauté par des approches personnelles ou collaboratives
  • Concevoir des projets en collaboration
  • Transférer et appliquer l’apprentissage à de nouvelles situations
  • Concevoir et présenter des idées nouvelles ou perfectionnées dans le cadre d’une résolution de problème
Communiquer
  • Communiquer des idées, des explications et des processus de diverses façons
  • Exprimer et approfondir ses expériences personnelles, collectives ou autres sur le lieu
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Poser des questions et faire des prédictions : un changement survient lorsqu'un facteur vient modifier la forme, la nature, le contenu ou l’évolution future. Par exemple, la troisième loi de Newton, selon laquelle à toute force s'oppose toujours une force égale de sens opposé, décrit les effets de la poussée et de la traction.
    • Questions clés sur les changements :
      • — Comment notre système solaire a-t-il changé au fil du temps?
      • — Comment l'exploration des environnements extrêmes sur la Terre et dans l'espace a-t-elle changé au cours de la dernière décennie?
  • Sources secondaires : les sources secondaires de données peuvent être des comptes rendus anthropologiques, des témoignages contemporains des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique, des médias d'information, des archives, des journaux, etc.
  • Lieu : tout environnement, localité ou contexte avec lesquels interagit une personne pour apprendre, se créer des souvenirs, réfléchir sur l’histoire, faire des liens avec la culture et définir une identité. Le lien entre la personne et le lieu est fondamental dans l'interprétation du monde des peuples autochtones.
    • Questions clés sur le lieu :
      • En quoi le lieu influence-t-il ta capacité à planifier et à mener une recherche?
      • Comment ta compréhension d'un lieu influence-t-elle ta façon de recueillir et d'évaluer des données?
      • Comment les expériences et les histoires basées sur le lieu des autres influencent-elles ta façon de communiquer tes résultats et d'autres informations?
      • Les méthodes d’acquisition du savoir font référence aux diverses croyances sur la nature des connaissances que possèdent les personnes. Elles peuvent être autochtones, liées au sexe, spécifiques à un domaine ou à une discipline, culturelles, intégrées, intuitives, etc. Quels sont les liens entre les méthodes d’acquisition du savoir et le lieu?
content_fr: 
  • Les structures et les fonctions de base des systèmes du corps :
    • système urinaire
    • système reproducteur
    • système hormonal
    • système nerveux
  • Les mélanges hétérogènes
  • Les mélanges :
    • séparés en utilisant une différence dans les propriétés des constituants du mélange
    • connaissances des peuples autochtones de la région sur les méthodes de séparation et d'extraction
  • Les trois lois du mouvement de Newton
  • Les effets des forces équilibrées et non équilibrées dans les activités physiques quotidiennes
  • La force de gravité
  • L’échelle, la structure et l’âge de l’Univers
  • La position, le mouvement et les composants de notre système solaire dans notre galaxie
content elaborations fr: 
  • Systèmes : compréhension qu’ont les peuples autochtones des systèmes du corps humain et animal
  • Système urinaire : reins, uretères, vessie, etc.
  • Système reproducteur : ovaires, testicules, etc.
  • Système hormonal : messagers chimiques du corps (p. ex. insuline, adrénaline)
  • Système nerveux : cerveau, moelle épinière, etc.; rôle des récepteurs – le cerveau interprète les signaux qu’il reçoit et peut faire des erreurs d’interprétation (p. ex. illusions d’optique)
  • Les Mélanges hétérogènes : suspensions (p. ex. vinaigrette), émulsions (p. ex. lait), colloïdes (p. ex. aérosols)
  • séparés en utilisant une différence dans les propriétés des constituants du mélange :
    • densité (p. ex. centrifugation ou décantation, dépôts d’argile dans un delta de rivière, bassin de décantation, sections de décantation des aqueducs romains)
    • taille des particules (p. ex. tamis, filtre)
  • Connaissances des peuples autochtones de la région : méthodes de séparation et d’extraction anciennes et actuelles des peuples autochtones (p. ex. huile d'eulakane, extraction de substances médicamenteuses à partir de plantes, pigments, etc.)
  • Les trois lois du mouvement de Newton :
    • première loi : tout corps conserve son état de repos ou de mouvement uniforme, à moins que quelque force n'agisse sur lui 
    • deuxième loi : seule une force non équilibrée peut causer une accélération
    • troisième loi : à toute force s'oppose toujours une force égale de sens opposé (action-réaction)
  • Forces équilibrées et forces non équilibrées :
    • les forces équilibrées sont égales et de sens opposé (p. ex. une personne qui s’assoit sur une chaise)
    • les forces non équilibrées sont inégales; une force est plus grande que l’autre (p. ex. voitures de course sur des rampes différentes, voiture actionnée par un piège à souris, fusée)
  • Activités physiques quotidiennes : exemples des effets des forces équilibrées et non équilibrées dans les sports et les activités d’éducation physique à l’école
  • Force de gravité :
    • la gravité est la force d’attraction qui attire les corps les uns vers les autres
    • sur la Terre, la gravité attire les corps vers le centre de la planète (p. ex. chute d’un objet, défi de l’œuf)
  • Composants de notre système solaire :
    • planètes, lunes, astéroïdes, météorites, comètes, etc.
    • perspectives des peuples autochtones sur les aurores boréales et d'autres phénomènes célestes
    • environnements extrêmes, y compris les contributions canadiennes aux technologies de l'exploration (p. ex. Canadarm (bras télémanipulateur, SRMS), scaphandre atmosphérique Newsuit, programmes VENUS et NEPTUNE)
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes