Instructional Samples

These instructional samples show how teachers from across the province have interpreted the redesigned BC Curriculum to plan learning experiences for their students.

The committee that selected these materials recognizes that each district, school, and classroom has its own unique characteristics that should be considered in planning.

Each sample identifies clear connections to the Big Ideas, Learning Standards, and Core Competencies. First Peoples Principles of Learning and content are included in some samples.

Many of the samples make cross-curricular connections, offer choice for students and teachers, explore multiple entry points and adaptations, provide assessment ideas, and include samples of student work. Some also show how teachers have made explicit connections to the curriculum through cycles of thinking, planning, and reflection.

Through open-ended provocations students are invited to investigate and uncover mathematical concepts. Provocations often begin with an inquiry question, merging students’ interests and curriculum content. In this example, near the end of the school year, students are bringing together two familiar ideas – patterns and shapes. 
Grade Level(s): 
Kindergarten
Subject: 
Mathematics
Tags:
We were looking for a cross-curricular way to address probability content in Grade 4 Mathematics and content from Applied Design 4, which is new to the curriculum. We came up with the idea of making a game of chance, because we felt that the process of creating a game would reinforce new concepts in math and applied design by giving students an opportunity to apply these concepts in practice.  
Grade Level(s): 
Grade 4
Subject: 
Mathematics
Cross-Curricular: 
English Language Arts
Applied Design, Skills, and Technologies
This learning activity shows an example of cross-curricular teaching in which students have an opportunity to be innovators and constructors of their own learning. In focusing on designing and marketing a product, this learning activity mirrors the interdisciplinary nature of the world: to be successful in business it is important to have creative ideas, good communication skills, and a solid understanding of financial matters. Therefore, it felt natural and realistic to combine Math, Applied Design, and Language Arts in this activity. 
Grade Level(s): 
Grade 8
Subject: 
Mathematics
Cross-Curricular: 
English Language Arts
Applied Design, Skills, and Technologies

Cette séquence porte sur la planification d’un enseignant de 5e et 6e année autour d’une activité liée aux programmes d’études de mathématiques et de français. Sur le thème de « Mon entreprise », les élèves sont amenés à explorer les notions de planification financière et de message cible en s’interrogeant sur les exigences et les compétences requises pour mener à bien un projet de création d’entreprise.

This instructional sample is only available in French.

Grade Level(s): 
Grade 5
Grade 6
Subject: 
Mathematics
Cross-Curricular: 
Français langue première
We use patterns to represent identified regularities and to make generalizations. This lesson extends patterning concepts taught in Kindergarten and Grade 1, where students learned to identify and extend patterns with multiple attributes. It is essential for students to describe, extend, and make generalizations about patterns that seem to be the same or different. This kind of categorizing and generalizing is an important developmental step on the journey toward algebraic thinking. 
File(s): 
Grade Level(s): 
Grade 2
Subject: 
Mathematics
Teachers and students at Richmond elementary schools, including Lord Byng and Tomekichi Homma, have been examining how mathematics can be experienced in the community, and connecting with stories of place. Inspired by the book Tluuwaay Waadluxan Mathematical Adventures, created by Elders, educators, community members, and students in Haida Gwaii, the Richmond teachers and students have looked for mathematics in their community and posed and solved problems of interest to them.
Grade Level(s): 
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Grade 7
Subject: 
Mathematics
The quantity of 5 is an essential benchmark number for young students, and a strong understanding of 5 will contribute to their understanding of 10, another significant benchmark number in our number system. As the complexity of number increases, the importance of understanding the decomposition of 10 in higher-level operations becomes evident. 
Grade Level(s): 
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Subject: 
Mathematics